How to Install a Kitchen Faucet


Tired of staring at your old faucet? Installing a new one is easy! (No, really.)

If you’ve been washing your hands a lot lately, you might have started paying extra attention to your faucet. Does it drip? Is the chrome flaking off? Is it dated?

Plumbing projects can be intimidating, because no one wants to accidentally flood their entire home. But installing a new kitchen faucet truly is a DIY that anyone can handle.

As long as you work slowly and follow the directions, you can add a beautiful faucet to your kitchen with zero emergency calls to the plumber.

Supplies:

  • New kitchen faucet (and the installation manual)
  • Adjustable wrench
  • Flashlight
  • Bucket
  • Rags
  • Cleaner
  • Screwdriver
  • Towels
  • Teflon tape (optional)

Before purchasing a new faucet, take note of your current setup. Look under the sink to see how many holes yours has (usually between one and four).

This determines the type of faucet that will work with your sink. A single-hole faucet can be installed in a three- or four-hole sink by adding a deck plate, but not vice versa.

Step 1

Remove everything from under your sink. This DIY takes place in tight quarters, so you want to make it as roomy as possible. Also, be sure to keep a towel nearby for any water drips.

full_cabinet

 

Step 2

Turn off the water supply lines to the kitchen faucet. There will be a cold water and hot water valve underneath your kitchen sink.

Turn each of these water valves clockwise until you can’t turn them anymore. Then turn on your faucet and make sure water doesn’t come out.

Keep the faucet in the “on” position to relieve any water pressure.

water_turnoff

Step 3

Now that the water is safely off, you can unhook the hot and cold water supply lines. You will need a wrench for this step. Simply loosen them (counterclockwise) until they unhook.

A little water may drip out, which is totally normal. Just keep your bucket and rags handy.

unhook_water_line

Step 4

Unscrew your old kitchen faucet from underneath the sink.

Every faucet is different, so yours may look a bit different than this one. Ours had a gold ring that we just had to loosen with our hands. Others might be connected with a nut. If that’s the case, you’ll have to use your wrench again.

unscrew_faucet

Step 5

Pull your old faucet through the top of the kitchen sink and out.

remove_old_faucet

Step 6

Clean up any gross residue that was hiding underneath your old kitchen faucet with your towel. This is the time to get it nice and clean, so put some muscle into it!

Step 7

Grab the manual for your new faucet, because you’re going to need it! Since every faucet is different, they all come with their own set of directions. But we’ll walk you through the general steps.

Feed your new kitchen faucet into the hole at the top of your sink. You may want to enlist a buddy to help keep the top secure as you venture underneath the sink.

feed new faucet

Step 8

Secure your faucet from underneath the sink. Ours required tightening a few screws.

screw_new_faucet_in_tightly

Step 9

Attach your cold and hot lines to their valves, and make sure they are nice and snug with your wrench.

You may want to wrap your threaded pipes with some Teflon tape to make sure your seal is tight and your connections remain leak-free!

attach lines

Step 10

Turn your water supply valves on … slowly! Then check the faucet to make sure both your hot and cold water are working.

turn water on

That’s it. Seriously easy, right?!

You can elevate the look of your kitchen in under an hour, and it will only cost you the price of a new faucet.

Related:



Source link

10 Easy Pieces: All-Glass Kitchen Storage Containers


I’ve long admired German designer Wilhelm Wagenfeld’s Kubus storage containers. Designed in 1938, the stackable kitchen containers, in a thick Bauhaus-ian style glass, feature corresponding glass lids. The containers are still airtight without the gaudy plastic or wildly multi-colored tops. Sometimes those things are fine, but when your storage containers sit out on your countertop, shouldn’t they be as beautiful and well-made as any table lamp or centerpiece dish?

In the past, we’ve profiled our favorite plastic-free storage containers for the kitchen, but for the purists and glassware enthusiasts out there, here’s our list of all-glass containers that fit the bill.

A longtime Remodelista favorite, the German Weck Jar (at left and right) designed for canning can be used (and we often do) without it&#8
Above: A longtime Remodelista favorite, the German Weck Jar (at left and right) designed for canning can be used (and we often do) without it’s bright orange rubber seal. When used with the coordinating clamps, the jar is still airtight enough for keeping dried goods (just not for proper canning). You can find the jars at The Container Store for $3.99 to $4.99 each and often at retailers like Amazon.
Designed by Marco Sironi for Ichendorf Milano, the petit Ichendorf Piuma Sugar Bowl with Scoop can be used for more than just sugar and made of borosilicate glass, is beautiful enough for the countertop.
Above: Designed by Marco Sironi for Ichendorf Milano, the petit Ichendorf Piuma Sugar Bowl with Scoop can be used for more than just sugar and made of borosilicate glass, is beautiful enough for the countertop.
Even Ikea is on board with the all-glass container. Their Ikea 365 Food Container with Glass Lid in , 57, and data-src=
Above: Even Ikea is on board with the all-glass container. Their Ikea 365 Food Container with Glass Lid in 20, 57, and 112 ounce sizes, range from $4.49 to $7.99 each.
From German makers of lab glass solutions for the kitchen, Trendglas Jena&#8
Above: From German makers of lab glass solutions for the kitchen, Trendglas Jena’s Glass Jars come in small, medium, and large sizes priced up to about $18 each. They can be found in store at La Trésorerie in Paris or online at Edition Populaire in Switzerland.
Designed with a black airtight silicone seal (but otherwise all glass), Maria Berntsen&#8
Above: Designed with a black airtight silicone seal (but otherwise all glass), Maria Berntsen’s Scala Storage Jars start at $24.95 at the MoMA Design Store.
The classic cookie jar, Anchor Hocking&#8
Above: The classic cookie jar, Anchor Hocking’s Glass Canisters with Glass Lids are $7.99 to $15.99 each at The Container Store.
Another Remodelista favorite, now hard to find, the Trendglas Jena Glass Storage Dish comes with glass or plastic lids. Available through Trendglas Jena directly in Germany for €
Above: Another Remodelista favorite, now hard to find, the Trendglas Jena Glass Storage Dish comes with glass or plastic lids. Available through Trendglas Jena directly in Germany for €22.40 for the largest size.
Based in Japan, designer Peter Ivy makes the more luxe of storage jars from hand-blown grey-green glass fashioned with a copper wire. Shown here, the Peter Ivy Grey Glass Coffee Jar is $300; also available are the Small, Medium, and Large Pasta Jars at March.
Above: Based in Japan, designer Peter Ivy makes the more luxe of storage jars from hand-blown grey-green glass fashioned with a copper wire. Shown here, the Peter Ivy Grey Glass Coffee Jar is $300; also available are the Small, Medium, and Large Pasta Jars at March.
The simple Kinto Low Glass Canister had a glass lid and a clear rubber band seal; about $9 USD each at Dansk Shop.
Above: The simple Kinto Low Glass Canister had a glass lid and a clear rubber band seal; about $9 USD each at Dansk Shop.
Available on Amazon, the Mast Home Glass Storage Jars are $.99 for a set of 4.
Above: Available on Amazon, the Mast Home Glass Storage Jars are $25.99 for a set of 4.

For more kitchen containers see our posts:



Source link

A Harlem Kitchen Designed with Nostalgic Notes


Storage and lighting add to the home, sweet home quotient

harlem kitchen renovation, kitchen renovation, Sweeten kitchen renovation

“After” photos by Kate Glicksberg for Sweeten

Project: Refreshing an ineffective Harlem kitchen a family has outgrown

Before: When Andréa and her husband purchased an early 1900s four-story brownstone in Harlem, the plan was to rent the top two apartments and live in the 2-bedroom, 2 ½ bath duplex. For a long time, the place felt “soooo big.” That is, until the couple started their family. Now, with an 11-year-old son, a 9-year-old daughter, cat, Romeo, and her husband’s ever-growing record collection, Andréa said, “It started feeling claustrophobic.” 

Sweeten renovator, Sweeten home renovator

The first space in their Harlem home she wanted to tackle: the kitchen. “It’s where I spend a lot of time,” says Andréa. “It was so cluttered and dim. I didn’t enjoy cooking at all. I remember balancing pans on top of each other while making dinner.”

Storage was clearly an issue. “First of all, the shelves in our cabinets weren’t adjustable—so we couldn’t even store cereal boxes or olive oil or anything taller than about eight inches. So we just had a ton of stuff on the counters or on top of the fridge.”

before and after kitchen, kitchen renovation, Harlem kitchen renovation

Appliances ate into counter space as well. “We had this massive microwave that took up an entire baking station, so we lost workspace there, too.” And then there was the lighting. “We had this one dim light that didn’t even light up the area by the sink. We always felt like we were working in the dark. And our dishwasher was dying.”

The two had an unpleasant experience with a master bath reno 12 years ago (Andréa says the contractor took their money and disappeared). This time, they posted their Harlem kitchen renovation project on Sweeten, a free renovation platform that connects homeowners with vetted contractors, and they were immediately impressed.

“I felt like the Sweeten contractor we chose offered the best price for the job,” she said. “His team is very efficient and punctual. It’s great to have someone show up when they say they will and finish on time!”

After: 

Although the same 450-square-footprint was retained, their Harlem kitchen was expanded a few feet by knocking down a wall and opening up space for a bar/counter and pantry. 

before and after kitchen, white kitchen, kitchen renovation, Harlem kitchen renovation

Besides improving storage and lighting, Andréa knew the look and style she wanted from their kitchen renovation. “I’m from California, and I miss it all the time—the weather, the sky, the ocean. So I picked colors that reminded me of my hometown of Morro Bay and also the Bay area, where I went to college,” she said. “I liked the idea of gray cabinets. My mom recently did her kitchen in all white, and after two years, it was already showing use. It seemed impractical with two kids.”

The gray stock cabinets reminded her of fog around the ocean (“a win-win”). And the paint, kind of a peach color, was like sunsets—“a soothing combination.”  Even the grout color between white subway tiles has a little peach in it. She felt a quartz countertop was a nice balance. 

before and after kitchen, white kitchen, kitchen renovation, Harlem kitchen renovation

Andréa loves tea, and she has some beautiful blue Fortnum and Mason (a brand based in London) tins, which also reinforced the blue accents. “It’s kind of Jamaica-meets-Miami-meets-Cali-meets-London,” she says.

Andréa says that their contractor’s wife, Suzy, also helped make sure everything went smoothly. “Suzy was a godsend,” says Andrea. “We had a pretty firm budget and I felt like she worked very hard to stay in it without pushing for more expensive stuff or using cheap things. It was a very nice middle ground.”

And the result? A huge success. “I love the whole feel of (the new space),” says Andréa. “The colors are really inviting, and the cabinets make it feel bigger, even though it’s basically the same square footage. Of course, the kitchen is so beautiful, now we want to update everything in the house!”

Bonus: “I love my undercabinet lighting,” she says. “It wasn’t originally in the plans. It was an addition during the reno that has made a huge difference. Also—my hidden recycling bins!”

Thank you, Andréa and your family, for sharing your new kitchen with us!

KITCHEN RESOURCES: Nickel Kitchen cabinets: Fabuwood. Sink/Faucet: Ruvati. Dishwasher: Bosch. Lighting: West Elm. Paint: Benjamin Moore.

WATCH VIDEO:

Check out Sweeten’s 2020 Kitchen Renovation Costs in NYC guide and start exploring for your future kitchen renovation.

Sweeten handpicks the best general contractors to match each project’s location, budget, scope, and style. Follow the blog, Sweeten Stories, for renovation ideas and inspiration and when you’re ready to renovate, start your renovation on Sweeten.



Source link

Kitchen of the Week: A Photographer’s Flexible Studio Kitchen in Ojai Valley


There’s a slim category of kitchens that embodies everything we think a kitchen workspace should be—equal parts functional and beautiful—and it’s the photographer’s studio kitchen. These spaces must be practical and usable, with efficient storage and clever shape-shifting solutions. But, as backdrops for photographs of lush entertaining spreads and heaping bowls of food, they must also be clean-lined and aspirational. (Just take a look at this one in Berkeley we featured a few months back.) The photo studio kitchen is flooded with natural light, flexible, and, often, with a photographer’s eye behind the design, especially artful.

This is particularly the case with photographer Victoria Pearson‘s studio, an outbuilding beside her house in California’s Ojai Valley that doubles as guest quarters (and which we first spotted over on Rip & Tan). When Pearson first moved into the main house, she rented out the small building—then strictly a guest house—to the existing tenants for a while, then renovated it top to bottom, transforming it into photo studio by day and guest space when needed, focusing especially on re-making the kitchen into a workable and beautiful backdrop for Pearson’s photography. (In addition to magazines like Travel + Leisure and Martha Stewart publications, you may have spotted her work in the cookbook Citrus: Sweet and Savory Sun-Kissed Recipes.)

“It is a perfect studio,” says Pearson of the space, and it happens to be an airy, thoughtful living space, too. Join us for a look.

Photography by Victoria Pearson.

Before work began, the outbuilding had &#8
Above: Before work began, the outbuilding had “a sleeping loft and, strangely, three bathrooms,” Pearson says.

To make the small building more efficient, Pearson downsized from three bathrooms to one large one and took out the loft. Then she set in on transforming the space from pure guesthouse to a working photo studio, replacing all of the glass with non-tinted glass (“it’s usually a green tint,” she says), adding barn doors for easy access to the garden, replacing the Spanish-style tile floors with cement, and painting the interior in, as she says, “plain white white.”

The priority, though, was re-doing the existing kitchen to optimize it for shooting. Pearson opted for an open plan that can be made even more open or moved around during shoots; everything is lightweight or on wheels. The kitchen is a high-low mix: a Viking stove and Miele dishwasher mixed with a quirky rattan lamp and Frosta stacking stools (a Remodelista favorite), both from Ikea. “I collect the good pieces,” she says of Ikea; “anything woven, wicker, or rattan”.

Open shelves display Pearson&#8
Above: Open shelves display Pearson’s collections of glassware and ceramics, used to style her photography. Her sources? “I love flea markets, thrift stores, and estate sales. I’ve brought back things from all over my travels,” she says. The coffee cups shown here are a mix of Mt. Washington Pottery and local Ojai ceramicist Mark Churchill.
Restaurant-style metal shelves on casters add significant storage for props, bakeware, and utensils, but can be rolled away to clear the room for a shot. The kitchen opens directly onto Pearson&#8
Above: Restaurant-style metal shelves on casters add significant storage for props, bakeware, and utensils, but can be rolled away to clear the room for a shot. The kitchen opens directly onto Pearson’s gardens.
A slim workspace, with a clean-lined desk and stool, fits next to the KitchenAid fridge, along with a low credenza on wheels for easy transportation while shooting.
Above: A slim workspace, with a clean-lined desk and stool, fits next to the KitchenAid fridge, along with a low credenza on wheels for easy transportation while shooting.

Pearson opted for rattan and natural-fiber details throughout the studio, from baskets to the daybed in the living area—for looks, but also for portability. “Everything in the studio needs to be easily moveable,” she says. “I sometimes clear the space for a photo shoot, or have it furnished for family and friends visiting.”

Case in point: An open lounge area is kept sparse, with a glass cabinet serving as storage for more props, and a low daybed from Elsie Green. &#8
Above: Case in point: An open lounge area is kept sparse, with a glass cabinet serving as storage for more props, and a low daybed from Elsie Green. “It’s covered in French ticking that I kept for 20 years waiting for the perfect project,” Pearson says. The Malm fireplace “replaced a cast-iron wood burning stove,” she says.

Pearson’s fine art photography, which she shoots in addition to commercial work, hangs on the walls. “I love the idea of Tabula Rasa: blank slate. I want images that you can interpret for yourself,” she says.

The added outdoor shower, paved with natural stones. Not shown: the studio&#8
Above: The added outdoor shower, paved with natural stones. Not shown: the studio’s bedroom. “I don’t sleep in the studio, but I do come over to use the outdoor shower in the winter,” Pearson says.

Follow Pearson’s work on Instagram at @victoriapearsonphotographer and @tabularasapicture.

Take a look at a few more California kitchens:



Source link

7 Ways Renovators Style Ikea Kitchen Cabinets to Work for Them


Chic and cost-effective? These 7 renovations show how to style Ikea kitchen cabinets to make that happen.

Aside from closets, kitchen cabinets represent one of the larger concentrations of millwork and storage designed to keep spaces organized and clutter out of sight. Whether modern or traditional or navy blue or natural wood, the cabinets you choose will have an impact on the look and feel you want your kitchen to portray. 

Some homeowners choose to go fully custom, some opt for stock cabinets, and sometimes it’s a mix. To assist in your research, Sweeten, a free renovation platform that matches homeowners with licensed general contractors and tracks their projects, has rounded up a few of our renovators’ kitchens. Here, the thinking behind their decision to incorporate Ikea cabinets into their cook spaces with the help of their Sweeten contractors.

For High Gloss Glamour

butcher block countertop

Lavanya and Regis’s gallery-style kitchen got a major style overhaul during their railroad-style apartment renovation. To make the main rooms bright and airy, they chose glossy white Ikea kitchen cabinets to complement their high-gloss, white-painted wood floors.

Go Low on Cost, High on Style

Ikea kitchenFull disclosure: Sally’s kitchen is a mix of Ikea Sektion bases and custom door fronts from Scherr’s. It’s a great example of how to get a bespoke look for less—and saved the renovator (she has four under her belt!) $25,000.

For Euro-Industrial

studio loft kitchen

Uldis and Serge, Europeans-turned-New Yorkers, mixed contrasting colors and finishes with their styled Ikea kitchen cabinets to create a Euro-Industrial feel. Their upper kitchen upper cabinets, which were a high gloss white, integrated smoothly with the stainless steel cabinets on the bottom. The end result? A sleek kitchen that doesn’t sacrifice fashion for function.

To Go Scandinavian Sleek

Ikea kitchenJen loves the Scandi-look, so when it came to renovating her kitchen, Ikea cabinets were a must. She chose the Veddinge cabinet front doors and minimalistic tab pulls to create an unfussy and practical cook space with major hygge vibes. 

For Expanded Pantry Space

We never thought pantry storage would become the crown jewel of a kitchen…but then we saw this Brooklyn kitchen. With wraparound, floor-to-ceiling shelving, including full-height 15″ upper Ikea kitchen cabinets, their multi-generational home has enough kitchen storage for all the family members.

To Complement Hero Pieces

Ikea kitchenIn a Manhattan loft this awe-inspiring with high ceilings and windows, it’s best to pick one or two show-stopping features. For this renovator, that meant the home’s original bones and a standout Carrara marble countertop and backsplash. So, when it came to styling his kitchen cabinets, he chose gray-blue Ikea to complement the rest of the apartment.

To Be Sustainable

Ikea kitchenSandra and Michael chose their Bodbyn style Ikea kitchen cabinets for a few reasons. They had originally planned to use reclaimed cabinetry, but given the kitchen’s tight layout, they needed a narrower option. “We decided to go with Ikea because we felt they offered the best sustainable options and price,” Sandra shared. 

P.S. Do you have an Ikea kitchen? We’d love to get your thoughts for an upcoming article. Leave a comment below addressing the following questions, and you could be featured! 1. How long have you had the cabinets? How have they held up? 2. Why did you choose Ikea? 3. Share any other comments/feedback you have.

Want more inspiration? Check out these kitchens before and afters.

Sweeten handpicks the best general contractors to match each project’s location, budget, scope, and style. Follow the blog, Sweeten Stories, for renovation ideas and inspiration and when you’re ready to renovate, start your renovation on Sweeten.



Source link

Kitchen Pantries You’ll Envy | www.nar.realtor


Yes, even rows of canned or boxed foods can look pretty and organized. A home buyer will certainly take a peek inside a pantry, and even if it’s small, you can make it look impressive through organization and design. 

So how can you make sure the kitchen pantry adds to an overall property’s staging? Here are a few examples from remodeling website Houzz to glean inspiration for recreating the pantry space. 

Swap out wire shelving for wood shelving.

Group like-minded items.

For example, keep boxed items grouped together in one spot and canned foods in another. Heavy items, such as packages of bottled water, can be stored at the bottom of pantry shelves.

Bring in lots of containers.

For example, use glass or plastic containers to store dried foods like flour, sugar, and cereals. Add labels on the outside to dress up the containers.

Hide any food clutter in baskets.

Add a table to break up the shelving space.

Use these shelves to display a coffee machine or to store small appliances. But minimize how much you store on these inner pantry tables to help open up the space.

Show off the pantry’s height: Add a ladder.

Dress up the entrance to the pantry with a sliding door.

Add some wallpaper accents.

Look for ways to bring in extra storage when tight on space.

For example, the designer added extra shelving hung on the interior part of the door, and then painted the door blue to make it pop. 

Include a decorative lighting fixture.



Source link

Kitchen of the Week: A Photographer’s Light-Flooded Shaker-Scandi Carriage Studio


The first thing one learns in any introduction to photography class is that capturing images with a camera is all about light—the presence of it, the absence of it, the quality of it. Which is why when Vancouver-based photographer Gillian Stevens convinced her parents to turn a carriage house in their backyard into her own photo studio, foremost on her mind was how to get more light into the space.

“There was not very much natural light. It was a practical and cozy space but not really inspiring in any way,” says Gillian of the original structure, which was once a garage. Her solution? Gut the thing. “We added a ton of natural light through large glass patio doors, increased the window size in the kitchen, and added windows to the living and bathroom.”

Speaking of the windows, they are 100-year-old antique windows sourced by her dad through Craigslist for $80. “We had them restored locally, and they completely transform the feeling of the cottage,” says Gillian.

See for yourself. (And to rent the space for a photo shoot or event, go here.)

Photography by Gillian Stevens.

&#8
Above: “The inspiration for the studio is a mix of classic British interiors mixed with Scandinavian minimalism,” says Gillian. “The purpose for the carriage studio is photography, so it was completely designed with that in mind: soft neutral colors, textures, and as much natural light as possible.”
Gillian designed the Shaker-inspired cabinets herself and worked with her contractor, Greycor, to bring them to life. On the walls is &#8
Above: Gillian designed the Shaker-inspired cabinets herself and worked with her contractor, Greycor, to bring them to life. On the walls is “Smooth Stone” by CIL, which Gillian had color-matched at Benjamin Moore. The cabinets and ceilings are painted “Stoneware” by Benjamin Moore. The Atlin Table is by Lock & Mortice.
&#8
Above: “The biggest splurge was the Carrara marble countertop. It was the one element of the kitchen I wasn’t willing to compromise on—and I think it ties everything together,” says Gillian. The antique faucets were scored on Etsy.
All the lighting in the studio—including the globe pendant, the kitchen sconces, and the lighting in the bathroom—are by Cedar & Moss.
Above: All the lighting in the studio—including the globe pendant, the kitchen sconces, and the lighting in the bathroom—are by Cedar & Moss.
Beautiful light refracted through the antique windows. The Georg Bench is from Skagerak Denmark
Above: Beautiful light refracted through the antique windows. The Georg Bench is from Skagerak Denmark
A perfect nook for a bed. The shelf was custom-made by Will Morrison Studio; the bedding is by Last Light Collection.
Above: A perfect nook for a bed. The shelf was custom-made by Will Morrison Studio; the bedding is by Last Light Collection.
&#8
Above: “The bathroom faucets and taps are a DIY that was originally inspired by a post on Remodelista. I hunted down the components, which I found are quite standard in the UK but not really available in North America. I had our contractor work his magic to make the valves fit with our copper piping (found at Home Depot),” shares Gillian. The Carissa bathtub is by Wyndham Collection, from Home Depot.
&#8
Above: “I love how the faucets turned out, and the entire thing was incredible affordable. It’s a favorite feature among our renters!”

Before

&#8
Above: “You can see it’s come a long way!” says Gillian of the before shot of the kitchen.

To see Gillian’s work on Remodelista, see:

And for more Scandi kitchens, see:



Source link

Steal This Look: A Remodelista’s Minimalist Galley Kitchen in Brooklyn Heights


When my husband, Josh, and I moved to Brooklyn Heights a couple of years ago, we were lucky enough to find a parlor floor flat that hadn’t been updated for a couple of decades, so it was a blank slate. The kitchen in particular needed work, so we called on our friend Malachi Connolly, a New York/Cape Cod-based architect, preservationist, and longtime board member of the Cape Cod Modern House Trust to oversee the renovation. Here’s how to get the look:

Photography by Matthew Williams, with styling by Alexa Hotz, for Remodelista.

My inspiration for the kitchen was English couturier Anna Valentine’s London apartment, which we featured on Remodelista a couple of years ago (see Kitchen of the Week: A Culinary Space Inspired by a Painting).
Above: My inspiration for the kitchen was English couturier Anna Valentine’s London apartment, which we featured on Remodelista a couple of years ago (see Kitchen of the Week: A Culinary Space Inspired by a Painting).
We turned to Brooklyn-based Jeremy Pickett of Pickett Furniture (one of our earliest Remodelista advertisers, back in the late aughts) for the minimally detailed cabinets. The countertops are Carrara marble. (For countertop guidance, see our post Remodeling data-src=
Above: We turned to Brooklyn-based Jeremy Pickett of Pickett Furniture (one of our earliest Remodelista advertisers, back in the late aughts) for the minimally detailed cabinets. The countertops are Carrara marble. (For countertop guidance, see our post Remodeling 101: The Difference Between Carrara, Calacatta, and Statuary Marble.) A repurposed florist vase holds stalks of garlic from the farmer’s market (I was inspired by David Tanis’ kitchen storage ideas).
I dithered on the kitchen pendant decision, so as a placeholder, we went with hardware store porcelain fixtures and decorative oversized Nostalgic Collection lightbulbs from Bulbrite, discovered at John Derian’s West Village shop.
Above: I dithered on the kitchen pendant decision, so as a placeholder, we went with hardware store porcelain fixtures and decorative oversized Nostalgic Collection lightbulbs from Bulbrite, discovered at John Derian’s West Village shop.
The wall-mounted Chicago Kitchen Faucet with articulated spout is a model we’ve used before; it’s well priced, American made, and incredibly durable. We installed a dowel in the cabinet above the sink to hold paper towels. (See Aha! Hack: Tension Rod as Paper Towel Holder.)
Above: The wall-mounted Chicago Kitchen Faucet with articulated spout is a model we’ve used before; it’s well priced, American made, and incredibly durable. We installed a dowel in the cabinet above the sink to hold paper towels. (See Aha! Hack: Tension Rod as Paper Towel Holder.)
We tucked a stacked Bosch washer/dryer behind a full-height door; instant laundry room.
Above: We tucked a stacked Bosch washer/dryer behind a full-height door; instant laundry room.
We chose a Bertazzoni PRO304GASX Range for its good looks and relatively slim profile (compared to a Wolf or a Viking).
Above: We chose a Bertazzoni PRO304GASX Range for its good looks and relatively slim profile (compared to a Wolf or a Viking).

Appliances

We scored our SubZero on Craigslist (price: $
Above: We scored our SubZero on Craigslist (price: $2,000). A new Sub-Zero BI-36U 36-Inch Built-In Bottom-Freezer Refrigerator is $10,945. (See 10 Easy Pieces: Best 36-Inch Counter-Depth Refrigerators.)
Our Bertazzoni 30-inch gas range model (pictured) is discontinued; its newer version, the Bertazzoni Professional Series 30 Inch Gas Range with 4 Brass Burners, is $3,67
Above: Our Bertazzoni 30-inch gas range model (pictured) is discontinued; its newer version, the Bertazzoni Professional Series 30 Inch Gas Range with 4 Brass Burners, is $3,672 at AJ Madison.
The Bosch 300 Series Compact Condensation Dryer and Washer are each $data-src=
Above: The Bosch 300 Series Compact Condensation Dryer and Washer are each $1,099. (See 10 Easy Pieces: Stackable Washer/Dryers.)
Our espresso machine is currently out of stock, but you can buy a refurbished Pasquini Livia 90 MN Espresso Machine for $899.
Above: Our espresso machine is currently out of stock, but you can buy a refurbished Pasquini Livia 90 MN Espresso Machine for $899.

Fixtures

The Chicago Faucets Wall-Mounted Adjustable Center Kitchen Faucet has an articulated spout, is well-priced, well-engineered, and offers a classic lab aesthetic; $5.8
Above: The Chicago Faucets Wall-Mounted Adjustable Center Kitchen Faucet has an articulated spout, is well-priced, well-engineered, and offers a classic lab aesthetic; $265.82 at Consumers Plumbing. For more ideas, see 10 Easy Pieces: Wall-Mounted Industrial Faucets.
The Bulbrite Vintage Ceiling Pendant Light Bulb ($35.95 from Nostalgic Bulbs) adds a note of drama.
Above: The Bulbrite Vintage Ceiling Pendant Light Bulb ($35.95 from Nostalgic Bulbs) adds a note of drama.
A Remodelista favorite for its budget price and classic looks, Leviton&#8
Above: A Remodelista favorite for its budget price and classic looks, Leviton’s Porcelain 600-Watt 250-Volt White Outlet Box Lampholder from Home Depot is just $1.92.(See Object Lessons: The Hardware Store Porcelain Light Socket.)

Accessories

Noda Horo&#8
Above: Noda Horo’s White Series Enamel Nestable Meal Prep Baking Trays come in multiple sizes; from $9 at Globalkitchen Japan.
The Riess Enamel Measuring Jug is £ at Manufactum. (See our post on Riess Enamel Accessories at Ancient Industries.)
Above: The Riess Enamel Measuring Jug is £26 at Manufactum. (See our post on Riess Enamel Accessories at Ancient Industries.)
The AGA Hard Anodized Kettle, made in the UK, is £5 at AGA Cookshop. (See  Easy Pieces: Classic Teakettles.)
Above: The AGA Hard Anodized Kettle, made in the UK, is £135 at AGA Cookshop. (See 10 Easy Pieces: Classic Teakettles.)
We use a Ben Wolff flower pot to hold our wooden utensils. This #6 Flower Pot in Light Brown/Beige Clay is nearly 8 inches tall and similar to ours; $6
Above: We use a Ben Wolff flower pot to hold our wooden utensils. This #6 Flower Pot in Light Brown/Beige Clay is nearly 8 inches tall and similar to ours; $62.50.
Borosil&#8
Above: Borosil’s Simple Glass Tumblers start at $32 for a set of 6 at Food52.
The David Mellor Birch Plywood Knife Block is $73 at Heath Ceramics. (See The New British Wave: data-src=
Above: The David Mellor Birch Plywood Knife Block is $73 at Heath Ceramics. (See The New British Wave: 12 Kitchen and Dining Essentials.)
We bought our ceramic canisters from the very first Martha Stewart catalog! These Stoneware Storage Jars from the Freight Store are similar; from £30.
Above: We bought our ceramic canisters from the very first Martha Stewart catalog! These Stoneware Storage Jars from the Freight Store are similar; from £30.
I bought our Frisbee Trash Bin, designed by French industrial designer Frédéric Perigot, at ABC Home (it’s also available from Luminaire); from $3.
Above: I bought our Frisbee Trash Bin, designed by French industrial designer Frédéric Perigot, at ABC Home (it’s also available from Luminaire); from $324.

For a full tour, go to Before/After: A Remodelista Editor’s Refreshed Parlor Floor Flat in Brooklyn Heights, NY.

For more Steal This Look stories, see:



Source link

Ask A Designer: How To Modernize A Kitchen That Is Stuck In The Past



ask a designer kitchen with a light palette and open shelves

In this Ask A Designer column, Jennifer Koper shares her tips for refreshing a kitchen with a light palette and open shelves.

Jennifer KoperQuestion: I’d like to spray my lower cabinets white and swap out my uppers for open shelving. How do I make this look good? K.S., Calgary

ask a designer kitchen before with dark cabinets

Answer: Having your cabinets painted a new color is an excellent way to update your kitchen! Opt for a bright white that will reflect light around the space. Replacing your upper cabinets with open shelving will definitely make your kitchen look airier, too. For a modern vibe, consider having your vent hood boxed in with drywall and painted to match your walls. Extending the box right to the ceiling will draw the eye up and create visual interest.

ask a designer kitchen with a light palette and open shelves

Similar to the Inspiration kitchen designed by Whitney Williams (above), install two floating wood shelves on either side of the vent hood. The top shelf should align with the bottom of the hood, with the second shelf 12 to 18 inches lower. Then, continue the shelving on the window wall, stopping just shy of the window frame. The key to styling your shelves is to choose items that are both good-looking and functional.

ask a designer speckled serving bowl

(Source: Speckle Serving Bowl 14″ (set of 2), $140, shophouseandhome.com)

ask a designer pitcher

(Source: Galiano Pitcher in Beige, $28, vdevmaison.com)

For color, try leaning a piece of art on a shelf.

ask a designer artwork with pears

(Source: Art by Kate Schutz, price available upon request, kateschutz.com)

Next, swap out your backsplash for an off-white quartz or marble slab with veining. For a more affordable option, opt for ceramic or marble tiles. Install the slab or tile just below the height of the lowest shelf and then, behind the range, up to the vent hood.

ask a designer quartz slab

(Source: Chantilly Quartz Slab, price available upon request, hanstone.ca)

Consider adding two white and brass sconces on either side of the hood as decorative lighting. Additionally, you could have puck lights installed on the underside of the shelves to illuminate your work surfaces.

ask a designer sconce with brushed satin brass

(Source: Small Cypress Sconce in Brushed Satin Brass and Satin White, $408, rejuvenation.com)

Finally, to bring in some warmth, replace your cabinet pulls with brass versions and add wooden counter stools at the peninsula.

ask a designer satin brass cabinet pull

(Source: Kent Collection Contemporary Cabinet Pull in Satin Brass by Richelieu, $11.50 each, homedepot.ca)

ask a designer counter stool

(Source: Kelley Counter Stool by Nuevo, $510, thebay.com)

These simple changes will give you the look of a bright, new kitchen without having to start from scratch!

Do you have a design dilemma? Send your questions to askadesigner@hhmedia.com.

The post <span class="title_highlight">Ask A Designer:</span> How To Modernize A Kitchen That Is Stuck In The Past appeared first on House & Home.



Source link

Hot Home Trend: The Kitchen Blues


Blue is emerging as a popular color choice in cabinetry, whether it’s a deep blue, a grayish-blue, or a softer pastel shade. Blue can be used to spice up a kitchen island or as the base color for the surrounding cabinetry.

Blue and gray have emerged as the top choices for contrasting kitchen island cabinets, according to the 2020 Houzz Kitchen Trends Study. Another trend is painting kitchen walls blue, which is appearing in 7% of upgraded kitchens (up from 5% last year). White cabinetry remains the overall dominant choice in kitchens, but blue has been gaining some traction over the past year.

Take a look at how designers are infusing more blues into kitchen design.










Source link