10 Easy Pieces: Kids’ Modern Beds


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The Remodelista editors provide a curated selection of product recommendations for your consideration. Clicking through to the retailer that sells the product may earn us a commission.



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A Madcap Apartment in Paris for a Creative Couple (Plus Kids)


How many patterned tiles is too many? Anki Linde and Pierre Saalburg of Paris-based LSL Architects say to each his own limit—and that the couple who own this rambling Paris apartment happen to have a higher threshold than most.

These clients—she’s a film director/writer, he’s co-owner of a satirical newspaper, and they have two kids—approached the remodel of their Rue de la Rochefoucauld quarters with a playful spirit, and the architects responded in kind. “Each space is designed as if it has its own identity and story to tell, sometimes indifferent to each other,” says Linde. And yes, tile plays a starring role, some painted monkeys, too.

Photography by Katrin Vierkant, courtesy of LSL Architects.

The apartment occupies the third floor of a grand th-century Parisian building. Linde and Saalburg divided the layout into three zones: the living area in the center with the parents&#8
Above: The apartment occupies the third floor of a grand 19th-century Parisian building. Linde and Saalburg divided the layout into three zones: the living area in the center with the parents’ and kids’ rooms at opposite ends: “giving all parties the privacy they need.”

Linde describes the space pre-remodel as “refurbished for some banker in a sterile, cheap style,” but it came with preserved “point de hongre” (solid oak parquet) floors, marble fireplaces, and plaster moldings, all of which they repaired. The painting over the living room mantel is by Swedish artist Orjan Wickstrom. The reading light is from Ikea.

The living room opens to a combination dining area and kitchen. &#8
Above: The living room opens to a combination dining area and kitchen. “Even though the owners are very fond of cooking, they wanted the room to feel at first glance like a bar rather than a kitchen,” says Linde, noting that for the central counter Ceramiques Du Beaujolais fabricated 18 tile shapes to LSL’s specs.

The monkey-patterned walls mark the entry to the kids’ quarters.

The sink was custom made by Etains e Lyon, which specializes in classic all-metal sinks and counters. Linde sourced the industrial brushed stainless steel pulls online: they&#8
Above: The sink was custom made by Etains e Lyon, which specializes in classic all-metal sinks and counters. Linde sourced the industrial brushed stainless steel pulls online: they’re Poignée de Tirage Massive from Eurowale.

The mirrored cabinet to the right conceals the fridge and other storage: “it’s the place where things you don’t want to look at go.”

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Above: “We designed a wooden structure that the carpenter prepared onto which the tin was wrapped,” says Linde.
 Ab0ve: A built-inn pantry with a glazed steel door stands on the other side of the kitchen bar. The clients bought the French glass hanging lights at a flea market.
Ab0ve: A built-inn pantry with a glazed steel door stands on the other side of the kitchen bar. The clients bought the French glass hanging lights at a flea market.
The dining table doubles as a work area. It was bought at a Paris flea market and has a top made of blue stone from Liège.
Above: The dining table doubles as a work area. It was bought at a Paris flea market and has a top made of blue stone from Liège.



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10 Easy Pieces: Kids’ Stools for the Bath


For reaching grown-up-sized countertops and sinks, here are 10 kids’ stools for the bathroom, good-looking and versatile enough for other uses around the house.

The Liewood Ulla Step Stool, shown in Green Faune, is made of a blend of bamboo fiber and melamine; $53.95 at Scandiborn. The stool is also available in Mustard and Dumbo Grey.
Above: The Liewood Ulla Step Stool, shown in Green Faune, is made of a blend of bamboo fiber and melamine; $53.95 at Scandiborn. The stool is also available in Mustard and Dumbo Grey.
The HAY Solid Oak Butler Step Stool is $395 at MoMA Design Store.
Above: The HAY Solid Oak Butler Step Stool is $395 at MoMA Design Store.
Available through MARCH, the Blackcreek Mercantile & Trading Co. Step Stool is a short step up (7.5 inches) and is available in six different finishes of white oak for $460. For more than one kid, the Blackcreek Mercantile & Trading Co. Long Step Stool is over twice the length; $785.
Above: Available through MARCH, the Blackcreek Mercantile & Trading Co. Step Stool is a short step up (7.5 inches) and is available in six different finishes of white oak for $460. For more than one kid, the Blackcreek Mercantile & Trading Co. Long Step Stool is over twice the length; $785.
The Ekobo Kids Step Stool is made of bamboo and food-grade melamine. Available in Off White (shown), Lemon, and Lagoon for $ at The Tot. Also available at Zangra in Belgium.
Above: The Ekobo Kids Step Stool is made of bamboo and food-grade melamine. Available in Off White (shown), Lemon, and Lagoon for $25 at The Tot. Also available at Zangra in Belgium.
IKEA&#8
Above: IKEA’s Trogen Child’s Step Stool in Yellow is $19.
The Ferm Living Little Architect Stool comes in five colors and is designed for kids to stand on to brush their teeth or reach higher shelving; €95 at Ferm Living.
Above: The Ferm Living Little Architect Stool comes in five colors and is designed for kids to stand on to brush their teeth or reach higher shelving; €95 at Ferm Living.
On the higher end of the spectrum, the Le Corbusier-designed LC Stool for Cassina is a take on the classic apple box but can be handled from two sides; £58
Above: On the higher end of the spectrum, the Le Corbusier-designed LC14 Stool for Cassina is a take on the classic apple box but can be handled from two sides; £582 at TwentyTwentyOne.
The Pottery Barn Kids Classic Step Stool comes in one or two steps and in four different colors; $59 to $75.
Above: The Pottery Barn Kids Classic Step Stool comes in one or two steps and in four different colors; $59 to $75.
The Peg and Awl Step Stool comes in Oak, Walnut, and Blackened Oak for $data-src=
Above: The Peg and Awl Step Stool comes in Oak, Walnut, and Blackened Oak for $115 at Verishop.
The KidKraft Step n&#8
Above: The KidKraft Step n’ Store Natural Stool is currently on sale for $29.74 at Bed Bath & Beyond.

For more children’s furniture, see our posts:



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7 Simple Ways to Keep Your Kids’ Toys From Taking Over Your Home


Conquer the clutter and reclaim the precious space you once ruled.

If having your family at home all day, every day has made your space feel chaotic, and your days and nights seem to run together, regain a sense of order with these simple tips.

1. Reduce the clutter

It doesn’t matter how organized you are — a surplus of toys will always ensure your house is a mess waiting to happen. Fortunately, getting kids on board with the idea of ditching their stuff is a lot easier than it sounds.

The trick is to make it an opportunity for them to define themselves and their interests. Encourage kids to make a pile of ”baby toys” to donate, and have them set aside any toys that no longer interest them, such as action figures from a forgotten TV show. Separating these toys will help them appreciate how much they’ve grown and rediscover the toys they love.

2. Choose toys wisely

Since you’ll probably be stuck with them for a while, it pays to be picky when it comes to buying toys. To make toys more meaningful to your child, only buy them for holidays, special occasions and rewards — don’t shy away from asking relatives to do the same.

Avoid toys that are poorly made (cheap), not age-appropriate, unnecessarily large, pointless or anything tied to a movie — unless it’s that one you’ve been playing on repeat every day. The best toys are versatile, encourage creativity and can easily be expanded upon, such as Legos, wooden train tracks and dollhouse sets.

3. Leave some toys out of reach

If you’re constantly finding play dough and puzzle pieces in the sofa cushions, it’s time to put them on the top shelf of the closet. Designating these messy toys as ”family toys” will give you more quality time with your child instead of scrubbing pen marks off the curtains.

Also, try to set aside a tote of toys, games and puzzles for rainy days. This ensures you’ll always have a trick up your sleeve for sick days or when a boring relative visits.

4. Set boundaries

If toys are already sprawled out over every available surface of your house, don’t worry! You can quickly reclaim order in your household by setting a few ground rules, such as ”no toys in the kitchen” or setting limits on the number of toys allowed out overnight.

While that might seem a bit draconian, children are generally happier when they’re given clear expectations and few surprises. That’s why it’s important to follow through and pick up every night, no matter how exhausted you feel at the time.

5. Give kids ownership

Picking up toys doesn’t have to be boring. Babies, toddlers and big kids alike can have fun organizing and picking up, just as long as it’s not a negative experience. This means you should provide enough time for enjoyment without resorting to counting ”1, 2, 3” or shouting empty threats.

A great thing about setting aside extra time for picking up is that you and your child can do fun things like scoop up blocks with a blanket or deliver toys across the house via tricycle. If you make it fun enough, your kid will eventually pick up without even being asked.

6. Give every toy a home

Without a simple organizational system, picking up can be a major headache. Don’t throw everything into one big toy box; there’s a better way.

Buy a series of matching plastic bins and line them up along the wall where your child can easily put away and retrieve toys on his own. Designate one box for Legos, one for stuffed animals, one for train tracks … you get the idea.

Use stacking plastic boxes for smaller toys like matchbox cars and dolls. Organize them further by storing puzzle pieces, doll clothes and other annoyances in Ziploc bags.

7. Hit the books

It’s not your imagination. That pile of storybooks by the couch really is getting taller, and if you wait much longer, it will likely turn into a giant heap.

Worse yet, your kid uses those books to stall and push back bedtime a little later with each passing night. That’s why it’s important to either keep the books in your child’s room, or keep a small selection of favorites in a basket for easy retrieval.

Related:

Originally published December 2017



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Conan O’Brien Asks Kids In Greenland About Donald Trump Buying The Place



The kids had a pretty firm opinion on that in a “Conan” clip posted Tuesday (watch it above). But what really got ’em going was when the late night host proposed an even crazier real estate scenario.

Trump has been firmly rebuffed in his efforts to purchase the territory, but O’Brien nevertheless has taken it upon himself to visit Greenland and jokingly broker a deal. (He’s also doing it for his “Conan Without Borders” special on Sept. 3.)

Check out his conversation with the young Greenlanders in the sneak peek above.



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