Why Copper May Become Your Favorite Metal


In the era of the coronavirus pandemic, copper may become the “it” metal to add to your home design. In fact, you may want to add it everywhere because of its germ-repellant benefits alone.

Stainless steel, on the other hand, may quickly lose some fans. After all, research has shown COVID-19 can survive up to 72 hours on stainless steel.

That’s not the case for copper. Copper can actually kill bacteria and viruses, including the coronavirus, according to a recent study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Copper and many of its alloys—including brass and bronze—have antimicrobial properties and have been shown to kill greater than 99% of bacteria within two hours of exposure. It can continuously sanitize objects, destroying even the scariest of germs like the Norovirus, MRSA, E.coli, and the coronaviruses, including COVID-19.

Not surprisingly, the medical community is calling for more use of copper, such as in hospital settings and on public drinking fountains and public transportation railings.

Copper can be added inside homes, too: sinks, faucets, appliances, door hardware, hand rails, and more. The opportunities are endless. Certainly, copper tends to be more expensive than other metals. But if research continues to show it as a formidable COVID-19 repellant, more homeowners may find copper well worth the expense.



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Architects’ 12 Favorite Blush Pink Paints


One the eve of Valentine’s Day, we asked our experts from the Remodelista Architect and Designer Directory for their go-to “millennial pink” paints. Their picks range from sweet and subtle to downright seductive, and neutral enough to look at year-round. Here are their favorites.

Photography by Mel Walbridge.

(N.B.: Featured photograph, above, by Justine Hand for Remodelista, from Cape Cod Summer Bedrooms Refreshed with Farrow & Ball Paint.)

The full range of pinks.
Above: The full range of pinks.
 Kriste Michelini of California firm Kriste Michelini Interiors recommends Benjamin Moore&#8
Above: Kriste Michelini of California firm Kriste Michelini Interiors recommends Benjamin Moore’s Bridal Pink, with peachy tones.
For pink in &#8
Above: For pink in “subtle tones,” San Francisco–based Medium Plenty chooses Farrow & Ball’s Peignoir. (It’s also the color that Justine chose for her daughter’s bedroom; see picture at top.)
Santa Monica-based MLK Studio opts for Calamine from Farrow & Ball.
Above: Santa Monica-based MLK Studio opts for Calamine from Farrow & Ball.

Also recommended by Kriste Michelini: soft Touch of Pink by Benjamin Moore.
Above: Also recommended by Kriste Michelini: soft Touch of Pink by Benjamin Moore.
 Ellen Hamilton of Hamilton Design Associates prefers Wild Aster from Benjamin Moore.
Above: Ellen Hamilton of Hamilton Design Associates prefers Wild Aster from Benjamin Moore.
 Both LA-based Nickey Kehoe and Lauren Geremia of Bay Area–based Geremia Design named Farrow & Ball’s Pink Ground as their favorite go-to &#8
Above: Both LA-based Nickey Kehoe and Lauren Geremia of Bay Area–based Geremia Design named Farrow & Ball’s Pink Ground as their favorite go-to “millennial pink.”
Jayne Michaels of New York City–based firm
Above: Jayne Michaels of New York City–based firm 2 Michaels opts for Farrow & Ball’s Setting Plaster: “The pigments are earthy, smudgy, and warm, without a hint of sweetness,” she says.
 Brooklyn firm Made has devised a favorite custom pink: a coat of Seashell low-sheen paint by Australian company Sydney Harbour, topped with a coat of their French Wash, which creates a mottled patina look.
Above: Brooklyn firm Made has devised a favorite custom pink: a coat of Seashell low-sheen paint by Australian company Sydney Harbour, topped with a coat of their French Wash, which creates a mottled patina look.
Another, more rosy, choice from Medium Plenty: Cinder Rose by Farrow & Ball.
Above: Another, more rosy, choice from Medium Plenty: Cinder Rose by Farrow & Ball.

Jon Call of Mr. Call Designs in New York City likes Valspar’s Pale Satin Peach, adding, “Fresh pinks like this bring a flush to the face and warmth to a room.”
Above: Jon Call of Mr. Call Designs in New York City likes Valspar’s Pale Satin Peach, adding, “Fresh pinks like this bring a flush to the face and warmth to a room.”
Marysia Rybock of Scavullo Design recommends Benjamin Moore&#8
Above: Marysia Rybock of Scavullo Design recommends Benjamin Moore’s Southern Charm. “I actually used this in my own bedroom several years ago,” she says. “Soft pink with a beige undertone. Very classic looking.”

And finally, the brightest of the picks: Michael Howell of Howells Architecture & Design in Portland, Oregon, suggests Benjamin Moore’s Coral Reef. A little bit of this shade goes a long way; consider using it as an unexpected accent, rather than a full wall.
Above: And finally, the brightest of the picks: Michael Howell of Howells Architecture & Design in Portland, Oregon, suggests Benjamin Moore’s Coral Reef. A little bit of this shade goes a long way; consider using it as an unexpected accent, rather than a full wall.

Not pictured: Marie Fisher Interior Design uses Rose Pále from Les Couleurs’ Le Corbusier collection of pigments.

For more on our top paint picks, head to our Palette & Paints tag page. And for more pink palettes, see:



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2020’s Hottest Paint Colors: Which Is Your Favorite?


Pantone made a simple choice with “Classic Blue” as its 2020 Color of the Year. The paint company describes the color—which is remarkably close to REALTOR® Blue—as the “sky at dusk,” “timeless,” “easily relatable,” and “restful.” The color is being shown prominently on walls, rugs, decorative pillow accents, and kitchen cabinets. 

4. Behr: Back to Nature

Behr "Back to Nature"

Photo credit: Behr

Behr’s top color pick for 2020 is a meadow-inspired green called “Back to Nature.” The yellow-based, greenish hue aims to give the illusion of bringing the outdoors inside, whether splashed on a living room wall or bedroom throw pillow.

5. Benjamin Moore: First Light

Benjamin Moore First Light paint

Photo credit: Benjamin Moore

Benjamin Moore chose “First Light,” a soft, rosy color that follows the rising popularity of pinks and blushes. “First Light reflects a new definition of the home—a shift in mindset from the material to satisfying the core needs in life: community, comfort, security, self-expression, authenticity,” says Andrea Magno, Benjamin Moore’s director of color marketing and development. 

6. HGTV Home by Sherwin Williams: Romance

Sherwin Williams: Romance

Photo credit: HGTV Home by Sherwin Williams

HGTV Home also jumped on the pink trend with “Romance,” a soft, dusty shade. It has been shown as an accent against blues or as a dominant color on walls or furniture. The pale pink is a versatile color reminiscent of rose gold and rose copper, the company says.  

7. Graham & Brown: Adeline

Graham & Brown: Adeline paint

Photo credit: Graham & Brown

The British wallpaper company Graham & Brown offered a deep green hue called “Adeline” as its pick for 2020 Color of the Year. It’s a hunter green shade and yet another nod to the natural world.  

8. Dunn-Edwards: Minty Fresh

Dunn-Edwards: Minty Fresh paint

Photo Credit: Dunn-Edwards

Pastels are trending, and that’s why Dunn-Edwards chose “Minty Fresh,” a soft green that is meant to have a nostalgic 1950s feel. The company says the relaxing pastel evokes “calm” and “clean.”

9. Pratt & Lambert: Songbird

Pratt & Lambert: Songbird paint

Photo credit: Pratt & Lambert

Pratt & Lambert also went with a mint shade called “Songbird,” a color it refers to as “youthful” and “optimistic.” They predict a growth in botanical hues and chalky pastels in 2020. “Luxury and design are being looked at in a new light, with the influence of Hygge and pairing back movement. Our 2020 trending colors are a perfect example of this balance—a blend of glamorous jewel hues grounded by neutral tones,” says Ashley Banbury, senior color designer for Pratt & Lambert Paints. 

10. Kelly Moore: Sun God

Kelly Moore: "Sun God" paint

Photo credit: Kelly Moore

The paint brand Kelly Moore went bright and sunny with its choice of “Sun God.” Kelly Moore describes the color as “a brash, brassy yellow” that sets out to disrupt “white rooms and monochromatic schemes” with a powerful color punch. The firm predicts bright yellow to show up on everything from faucets and cabinets to upholstery and accent walls. “It’s a fresh accent color that pairs with neutrals just as well as pink has over the past few years, but the look is more bold and grown-up,” the company says. 

11. Valspar: 12 Nature-Inspired Colors



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