Architects’ 12 Favorite Blush Pink Paints


One the eve of Valentine’s Day, we asked our experts from the Remodelista Architect and Designer Directory for their go-to “millennial pink” paints. Their picks range from sweet and subtle to downright seductive, and neutral enough to look at year-round. Here are their favorites.

Photography by Mel Walbridge.

(N.B.: Featured photograph, above, by Justine Hand for Remodelista, from Cape Cod Summer Bedrooms Refreshed with Farrow & Ball Paint.)

The full range of pinks.
Above: The full range of pinks.
 Kriste Michelini of California firm Kriste Michelini Interiors recommends Benjamin Moore&#8
Above: Kriste Michelini of California firm Kriste Michelini Interiors recommends Benjamin Moore’s Bridal Pink, with peachy tones.
For pink in &#8
Above: For pink in “subtle tones,” San Francisco–based Medium Plenty chooses Farrow & Ball’s Peignoir. (It’s also the color that Justine chose for her daughter’s bedroom; see picture at top.)
Santa Monica-based MLK Studio opts for Calamine from Farrow & Ball.
Above: Santa Monica-based MLK Studio opts for Calamine from Farrow & Ball.

Also recommended by Kriste Michelini: soft Touch of Pink by Benjamin Moore.
Above: Also recommended by Kriste Michelini: soft Touch of Pink by Benjamin Moore.
 Ellen Hamilton of Hamilton Design Associates prefers Wild Aster from Benjamin Moore.
Above: Ellen Hamilton of Hamilton Design Associates prefers Wild Aster from Benjamin Moore.
 Both LA-based Nickey Kehoe and Lauren Geremia of Bay Area–based Geremia Design named Farrow & Ball’s Pink Ground as their favorite go-to &#8
Above: Both LA-based Nickey Kehoe and Lauren Geremia of Bay Area–based Geremia Design named Farrow & Ball’s Pink Ground as their favorite go-to “millennial pink.”
Jayne Michaels of New York City–based firm
Above: Jayne Michaels of New York City–based firm 2 Michaels opts for Farrow & Ball’s Setting Plaster: “The pigments are earthy, smudgy, and warm, without a hint of sweetness,” she says.
 Brooklyn firm Made has devised a favorite custom pink: a coat of Seashell low-sheen paint by Australian company Sydney Harbour, topped with a coat of their French Wash, which creates a mottled patina look.
Above: Brooklyn firm Made has devised a favorite custom pink: a coat of Seashell low-sheen paint by Australian company Sydney Harbour, topped with a coat of their French Wash, which creates a mottled patina look.
Another, more rosy, choice from Medium Plenty: Cinder Rose by Farrow & Ball.
Above: Another, more rosy, choice from Medium Plenty: Cinder Rose by Farrow & Ball.

Jon Call of Mr. Call Designs in New York City likes Valspar’s Pale Satin Peach, adding, “Fresh pinks like this bring a flush to the face and warmth to a room.”
Above: Jon Call of Mr. Call Designs in New York City likes Valspar’s Pale Satin Peach, adding, “Fresh pinks like this bring a flush to the face and warmth to a room.”
Marysia Rybock of Scavullo Design recommends Benjamin Moore&#8
Above: Marysia Rybock of Scavullo Design recommends Benjamin Moore’s Southern Charm. “I actually used this in my own bedroom several years ago,” she says. “Soft pink with a beige undertone. Very classic looking.”

And finally, the brightest of the picks: Michael Howell of Howells Architecture & Design in Portland, Oregon, suggests Benjamin Moore’s Coral Reef. A little bit of this shade goes a long way; consider using it as an unexpected accent, rather than a full wall.
Above: And finally, the brightest of the picks: Michael Howell of Howells Architecture & Design in Portland, Oregon, suggests Benjamin Moore’s Coral Reef. A little bit of this shade goes a long way; consider using it as an unexpected accent, rather than a full wall.

Not pictured: Marie Fisher Interior Design uses Rose Pále from Les Couleurs’ Le Corbusier collection of pigments.

For more on our top paint picks, head to our Palette & Paints tag page. And for more pink palettes, see:



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A Curated, One-Stop Source for Modern Hardware, from a Pair of Canadian Architects


One of the least-considered elements of a kitchen or bath remodel? Fixtures and fittings, which suddenly become an issue when you find yourself scrambling to source the perfect cabinet pull. Enter: Toronto company Casson, founded by Megan Cassidy and Jane Son, who met on their first day of architecture school at the University of Toronto in 1996. After many years of practice, they formed Casson Hardware in 2017.  As they say, “We were roommates as students, mothers of messy little boys, and conspiratorial friends to the end. We believe that great design begins with attention to the smaller details.”

Here’s a look at the offerings:

Above: Megan Cassidy (L) and Jane Son; “Our goal is to bring beautiful hardware to modern built environments.”
Above: The Catch-All Shelf from NakNak is made of steel with a powder-coated finish (available in Black, White, or Pink); $340.
Above: The Brassy Beau Top Mount Barn Door Hardware is designed and made in Toronto by local maker studio 1925Workbench; contact Casson for more information.
Above: The Tilde Pull Wall-Mounted Shelf by San Francisco-based Alice Tacheney is available with a satin brass or blackened brass pull.
Above: Bocci 22 is a suite of flush electrical accessories and plates for the most clean and minimal look for your walls. The Bocci 22 is plaster or tile mounting in white, black, and bone; go to Casson for more information.
Above: Unique and ethereal, Dutch designers Jeroen van de Gruiter’s latest collection showcases the artist’s provocative use of material and color; $CA445.
Above: Designed by Baccman Berglund and made in Sweden, the Curve Brass Toilet Holder is CA$135.

See more hardware finds from around the world:

Japanese Inflected Architectural Hardware from a Japanese Artisan



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DIY: A Mirror by Two Paris Architects (Made with Materials from the French Equivalent of Home Depot)


Hélène Pinaud and Julien Schwartzmann graduated from architecture school in Strasbourg in 2014 and promptly set up their own Paris firm, Heju. Operating out of their tiny garret apartment—we recently featured their $4,300 Kitchen Makeover—the couple became DIY experts out of necessity. They’re now so in-demand as architects that they they have less time to fiddle with scraps. But visits to Merlin Leroy, France’s version of Home Depot, occasionally lead to a new DIY. A recent project for their bathroom is this pivoting mirror that they describe as “a minimalist and geometric design inspired by Bauhaus shapes.” Hélène and Julien kindly agreed to explain how they put it together.

Photography by and courtesy of Heju.

DIY swivel mirror by Heju. Above: The mirror is supported by a brass rod inserted into a water-resistant MDF frame that doubles as a shelf. The mirror pivots “just enough,” the designers explain, “that you can tuck some beauty products behind it.”

Tools and Materials

Parts for the DIY swivel mirror by Heju. Above: Supplies are all from Leroy Merlin and require little more than assembling. They used a 42-centimeter round mirror and 1-meter-long brass rod, 8 millimeters in diameter. The frame is colored medium density fiberboard or MDF—in anthracite gray, so no painting or staining is needed—and the three pieces were cut to size at the store. (Unfortunately, colored MDF is harder to come by in the States; one source is ForesColor.) Go to Heju Miroir Pivotant for the exact specs.

Instructions

DIY swivel mirror in progress by Heju, Paris. Above: Drill 8-millimeter-wide holes into the top and bottom panels, 3.5 centimeters from the edge (one hole in the center and one at each end). Widen the holes as needed with your drill and screw the bottom panel to the back. N.B.: The designers recommend using black screws.
DIY swivel mirror by Heju, Paris, in progress. Above: If your supplier won’t cut a brass rod to size—53 centimeters long—use a hacksaw and sand the edges.
DIY swivel mirror by Heju, Paris, in progress. Above: The brass rod is centered and affixed to the mirror back: Hélène and Julien used a waterproof, transparent neoprene glue.
DIY swivel mirror by Heju, Paris, in progress. Above: Thread the rod through the top and bottom panel holes and then screw the top panel into place.
DIY swivel mirror by Heju, Paris, hangers being added. Above: Screw two sawtooth picture hangers to the back panel, and “you can proudly hang your mirror.”

The Finished Look

DIY swivel mirror by Heju. Above: The shelf is just big enough to display a few pretty items.

Explore our DIY Archive for many more projects, including these three by Heju:

  • DIY: A Homemade Terrazzo Table
  • DIY: A Summery Side Table and Plant Stand
  • DIY: The Heju Brass Wall Organizer

And check out our Steal This Look: The Heju DIY Tiny Kitchen Makeover.



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Kitchen of the Week: A London Architect’s Sky-Lit Compact Kitchen


We love every inch of this compact 14-by-10-foot kitchen in the Peckham neighborhood of London. Designed by architect Jonathan Nicholls and his partner, Alex Randall, a lighting designer, it occupies the rear extension of their Victorian home. While many architects find the experience of designing their own home an existential nightmare, Nicholls found it be quite the opposite:

“As an architect, working on your own house is great fun. Because of time constraints, I didn’t get a chance to do full, proper drawings, so a lot of the time I’d scribble some plans on the wall at night for the builders to interpret a few hours later,” he told The Modern House. “Because it was our own house, I could experiment a lot more with things I wouldn’t risk at work.”

Nowhere is that playful spirit more on display than in their artful kitchen.

Let’s take a tour. (To see the rest of their house, see the listing at The Modern House.)

Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: When the couple moved in five years ago, the kitchen was on the top of their list of rooms to redesign as they both love to cook.
Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: The cabinets are one of Nicholls’ “experiments.” “We weren’t entirely sure how it would turn out, but it’s beautiful,” he said of the engineered-ash plywood joinery.
Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: The most whimsical feature in the kitchen, though, may be the skylight that not only funnels in natural light but also offers a glimpse at the wildflowers growing on the roof garden.
Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: In lieu of upper cabinets, a single wall-mounted shelf holding cooking tools and decorative touches extends across the length of one wall.
Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: A stainless steel sink with an integrated draining board. (See The New Art Gallery: 12 Favorite Kitchens with Paintings on Display.)
Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: Steel and glass doors by Crittal usher in even more natural light from the patio.
Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: Limestone tiles extend from the entrance, down the hallway, and into the kitchen. The rest of the house enjoys oiled-oak floorboards.
Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: The patio just beyond the kitchen has a surprisingly tropical feel thanks to a palm tree and bamboo. (See 10 Things Nobody Tells You About Bamboo.)

For more plywood kitchens, see:

  • Steal This Look: A Stylish Camp Kitchen in a Plywood Summer Cabin
  • Plykea in London: Stylish Plywood Cabinet Fronts and Worktops for Ikea Kitchens
  • Kitchen of the Week: A Cost-Conscious Kitchen in Sweden



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