Kitchen of the Week: A Locavore Chef and Landscape Architect’s Low-Impact Kitchen


For landscape architect Victoria Taylor and chef Jamie Kennedy, a pioneer in Canada’s farm-to-table movement, it was all about the location: “The creek running through the property, the bluff overlooking the village, and a perfect south-facing slope for growing pinot noir,” says Victoria, were what they loved about their farmhouse in Ontario’s Prince Edward County. It certainly wasn’t the 100-year-old structure itself, which, while charming, lacked both heat and running water (hello, outhouse!). Still, they cherished their stays there.

That said, as soon as Vanessa Fong, an architect and Victoria’s cousin’s wife, launched her own business, “we got her on site to start talking!” Their collaboration led to a striking new addition that prioritizes both the couple’s emotional connection to the land and their wish to be as eco-conscious as possible.

“Jamie and Victoria had a strong guiding principle of using as many local materials and suppliers as possible,” says Vanessa. “They found heavy timber from an old barn literally just up the road from their property. (It doesn’t get much more local than that!) We assessed each piece and its usability. With the structural engineer, we then had to figure out where each piece could go and how to work it in with some steel structure to complete the ’skeleton’ of the home.”

It was an involved process, but what they ended up with—a lofty, low-impact kitchen and entertaining space that takes full advantage of the bucolic views—was well worth it. Let’s take a tour.

Photography by Cindy Blazevic, courtesy of VFA.

The large new addition connects to the original smaller farmhouse. &#8
Above: The large new addition connects to the original smaller farmhouse. “We wanted materials that would complement yet have a more contemporary angle,” says Vanessa, “hence, the stained wood siding (harkening back to barn board). The red metal roof is something that the existing farmhouse had and is prevalent in the area.”
The open space in the addition features polished concrete floors, white-washed pine walls, and salvaged timber ceiling beams. The slatted dining chairs by Canadian designer Thomas Lamb were a gift from Victoria&#8
Above: The open space in the addition features polished concrete floors, white-washed pine walls, and salvaged timber ceiling beams. The slatted dining chairs by Canadian designer Thomas Lamb were a gift from Victoria’s parents: “They are such a great design. To stack them away, you unbolt the seat frame and its slides flat,” she says.



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13 (Great) Questions for Architects Gachot Studios


With a background in hotel and retail design, Christine and John Gachot of New York’s Gachot Studios take a highly individual approach to their work. The user, not the style, comes first—which is never a bad strategy for private homes or hospitality projects like the Shinola Hotel in Detroit, which the firm completed in 2018. We asked Christine Gachot to share some insights:

  • RM: Opposites attract: what’s a favorite material pairing for you?
  • CG: We often play with contrasts in regard to setting rather than material. Our own Shelter Island, New York, weekend home is a 1920’s center hall colonial filled with contemporary and mid-century modern furniture: Charlotte Perriand library table, Alvar Aalto stools. Or think of an old Parisian apartment filled with the new pieces—it works every time. Historic architecture can act as a theatrical setting and a wonderful juxtaposition with more streamlined furniture.
The Gachots favor Noguchi rice-paper lamps; shown above, the Akari 75D in their own Shelter Island house. Photo by Ngoc Minh Ngo courtesy of Gachot Studios.
Above: The Gachots favor Noguchi rice-paper lamps; shown above, the Akari 75D in their own Shelter Island house. Photo by Ngoc Minh Ngo courtesy of Gachot Studios.



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Collective Composition: A Historic Villa Renovation in Auckland by Katie Lockhart and Jack McKinney Architects


We’ve long admired the work of New Zealand interior designer Katie Lockhart whose distinctive style crosses the boundaries between midcentury and contemporary while pulling from European, New Zealand, and Southeast Asian design. Lockhart recently completed the renovation of a traditional New Zealand villa in Ponsonby, Auckland, working with Jack McKinney Architects. The clients both work in creative fields, and took inspiration from a recent trip to Sri Lanka, where they encountered the work of architect Geoffrey Bawa.

Working with a relatively small site constrained by houses on all sides, McKinney was limited by the heritage rules surrounding the original dwelling, a timber construction with hipped metal roof typical of early New Zealand homes. Unable to change the exterior or the roofline of the original home, McKinney suggested an architectural expansion and the renovation to only the non-original parts of the house. McKinney and Lockhart agreed upon an identity for the architecture and interiors, preserving. the integrity of the original villa, located at the front, while developing a new vocabulary for the new spaces facing the garden in the back. “The result is very far from a typical Auckland villa alteration, but feels natural and calm, not strident and forced,” says McKinney.

Lockhart set out to enhance the sculptural nature of the space and support this vision, integrating an indoor garden, a palette inspired by Italian terracotta tiles and tinted trowel-polished plaster walls, and one-off design objects sourced from vintage dealers and her own travels.

Here’s a walk through the space.

Photography by David Straight courtesy of Katie Lockhart Studio.

The walls throughout the house are done trowel-polished plaster from Resene Rockcote, shown here in color Aalto Pause. The curtains are a cotton-linen mix, Ehbirra YP0 from Designs of the Time, running on a custom track made by woodworker Grant Bailey.
Above: The walls throughout the house are done trowel-polished plaster from Resene Rockcote, shown here in color Aalto Pause. The curtains are a cotton-linen mix, Ehbirra YP18016 from Designs of the Time, running on a custom track made by woodworker Grant Bailey.
The furniture in the living room is made up of the CS Sofa from Truck Furniture in Osaka, Japan, a side chair made by Grant Bailey, both with custom olive green upholstery, and benches and side tables from a sourcing trip to Japan. The rug is a vintage Tuareg rug from Kulchi. The lamp is the Hotaru Double Bubble Light by Barber & Osgerby for Ozeki & Co. Ltd.—the Japanese manufacturers of Noguchi lamp shades.
Above: The furniture in the living room is made up of the CS Sofa from Truck Furniture in Osaka, Japan, a side chair made by Grant Bailey, both with custom olive green upholstery, and benches and side tables from a sourcing trip to Japan. The rug is a vintage Tuareg rug from Kulchi. The lamp is the Hotaru Double Bubble Light by Barber & Osgerby for Ozeki & Co. Ltd.—the Japanese manufacturers of Noguchi lamp shades.
Lighting by way of an Aalto A8 Floor Lamp and FLOS Jasper Morrison Glo-Ball Table Lamp.
Above: Lighting by way of an Aalto A810 Floor Lamp and FLOS Jasper Morrison Glo-Ball Table Lamp.
McKinney had the idea to run custom walnut cabinetry along the entire length of the wall, connecting the living space to the kitchen beyond.
Above: McKinney had the idea to run custom walnut cabinetry along the entire length of the wall, connecting the living space to the kitchen beyond.
A wider view of the living room and open kitchen. Without a kitchen island, the architects note, the dining table becomes a central gathering space, connecting the two rooms as one.
Above: A wider view of the living room and open kitchen. Without a kitchen island, the architects note, the dining table becomes a central gathering space, connecting the two rooms as one.



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An Architect’s Narrow Townhouse in Montreal, Design Studio Included


The ask was formidable: update the Victorian-era townhouse; restore some of the period details that had been removed in an ill-conceived 1980s renovation; bring more light into the building, which had just two exposures (at the front and back); carve out a functional, client-ready office space that would feel separate from the rest of the home. And P.S., the building has a footprint of just 10 by 50 feet.

Fortunately, the architect, Michael Godmer, was more than up for the challenge. It was his house, after all. Michael shares the sliver of a home—three stories tall but skinny as can be—with his partner Mathieu Turgeon. The two had originally planned on overhauling only the kitchen, but then, in Michael’s words, “we began to scrap everything including the exterior.”

Good thing they did, because the results are transformative. Let’s take a tour of Maison Boutique Coloniale, their name for the project, and see how they turned their small and dreary townhouse in Montreal into a clean, well-lighted space suitable for work and home.

Photography by Maxime Brouillette, courtesy of Michael Godmer.

Michael and Mathieu&#8
Above: Michael and Mathieu’s house, located in Montreal’s Plateau Mont-Royal neighborhood, is sandwiched between two larger buildings.
The front door leads to the ground floor, which Michael has turned into his dedicated design studio. &#8
Above: The front door leads to the ground floor, which Michael has turned into his dedicated design studio. “We didn’t want to have the feeling of living in an office, and we also we didn’t want the client to have the impression of being in our home,” he explains of their decision to silo the office to this floor. Two black Gym Hooks by Hay hang at the ready for coat storage.
The staircase is original to the 85 house. The couple added a Tretford carpet runner in lambswool. The main work area is to the left. The String shelving and desk unit on the right is additional work space for colleagues that occasionally drop in to collaborate.
Above: The staircase is original to the 1885 house. The couple added a Tretford carpet runner in lambswool. The main work area is to the left. The String shelving and desk unit on the right is additional work space for colleagues that occasionally drop in to collaborate.
Michael in front of simple built-in desks and a display of tile samples. Under the desk are two Alex Drawer Units from Ikea.
Above: Michael in front of simple built-in desks and a display of tile samples. Under the desk are two Alex Drawer Units from Ikea.
Another Ikea find: the Sinnerlig cork stool designed by Ilse Crawford, now discontinued. Michael decided to turn the middle, window-less portion of the floor over to storage and utility closets and a powder room.
Above: Another Ikea find: the Sinnerlig cork stool designed by Ilse Crawford, now discontinued. Michael decided to turn the middle, window-less portion of the floor over to storage and utility closets and a powder room.
On the other end of the floor is a conference room for visiting clients. Michael added orange velvet drapery for a &#8
Above: On the other end of the floor is a conference room for visiting clients. Michael added orange velvet drapery for a “speakeasy atmosphere.”
The terrazzo powder room, featuring a sink from Porcelanosa.
Above: The terrazzo powder room, featuring a sink from Porcelanosa.
The kitchen, dining, and living rooms comprise the second floor. The terracotta tiled floors are new but replicate the original flooring in the kitchen.
Above: The kitchen, dining, and living rooms comprise the second floor. The terracotta tiled floors are new but replicate the original flooring in the kitchen.
Just off the kitchen is the couple&#8
Above: Just off the kitchen is the couple’s lush courtyard. Calacatta arabescato marble was chosen for its dramatic dark gray veining. The suspension light is by Artemide; the stools are from Hay.
The custom oak cabinetry is by Éco-Ébénisterie Saint-Dominique. A slim shelf rests above the backsplash.
Above: The custom oak cabinetry is by Éco-Ébénisterie Saint-Dominique. A slim shelf rests above the backsplash.
The couple furnished their home with a mix of vintage finds, new modern pieces, and family heirlooms, including the dining table and the rake, both from Mathieu&#8
Above: The couple furnished their home with a mix of vintage finds, new modern pieces, and family heirlooms, including the dining table and the rake, both from Mathieu’s side of the family. “His mother and father where living in Iraq for a time. They used it to scrape the sand,” says Michael of the rake.
The long view, from the living room, toward the dining room, into the kitchen.
Above: The long view, from the living room, toward the dining room, into the kitchen.
The simple living room, with a Serif TV by the Bouroullec brothers for Samsung. The couple chose Sherwin Williams&#8
Above: The simple living room, with a Serif TV by the Bouroullec brothers for Samsung. The couple chose Sherwin Williams’ High Reflective White for the walls throughout the home. The wood floors are original; they were simply sanded and treated with a matte varnish.
The third floor has two bedrooms. Here, simplicity abounds. A Nelson bubble lamp hangs above a platform bed from Floyd. The mirror is from Ikea.
Above: The third floor has two bedrooms. Here, simplicity abounds. A Nelson bubble lamp hangs above a platform bed from Floyd. The mirror is from Ikea.
&#8
Above: “The pink side table is custom-made for our small collection of furniture that we sell,” says Michael. A Carrie Portable LED Lamp by Norm Architects is cleverly used as a sconce here.

For more narrow homes, see:



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Architects’ 12 Favorite Blush Pink Paints


One the eve of Valentine’s Day, we asked our experts from the Remodelista Architect and Designer Directory for their go-to “millennial pink” paints. Their picks range from sweet and subtle to downright seductive, and neutral enough to look at year-round. Here are their favorites.

Photography by Mel Walbridge.

(N.B.: Featured photograph, above, by Justine Hand for Remodelista, from Cape Cod Summer Bedrooms Refreshed with Farrow & Ball Paint.)

The full range of pinks.
Above: The full range of pinks.
 Kriste Michelini of California firm Kriste Michelini Interiors recommends Benjamin Moore&#8
Above: Kriste Michelini of California firm Kriste Michelini Interiors recommends Benjamin Moore’s Bridal Pink, with peachy tones.
For pink in &#8
Above: For pink in “subtle tones,” San Francisco–based Medium Plenty chooses Farrow & Ball’s Peignoir. (It’s also the color that Justine chose for her daughter’s bedroom; see picture at top.)
Santa Monica-based MLK Studio opts for Calamine from Farrow & Ball.
Above: Santa Monica-based MLK Studio opts for Calamine from Farrow & Ball.

Also recommended by Kriste Michelini: soft Touch of Pink by Benjamin Moore.
Above: Also recommended by Kriste Michelini: soft Touch of Pink by Benjamin Moore.
 Ellen Hamilton of Hamilton Design Associates prefers Wild Aster from Benjamin Moore.
Above: Ellen Hamilton of Hamilton Design Associates prefers Wild Aster from Benjamin Moore.
 Both LA-based Nickey Kehoe and Lauren Geremia of Bay Area–based Geremia Design named Farrow & Ball’s Pink Ground as their favorite go-to &#8
Above: Both LA-based Nickey Kehoe and Lauren Geremia of Bay Area–based Geremia Design named Farrow & Ball’s Pink Ground as their favorite go-to “millennial pink.”
Jayne Michaels of New York City–based firm
Above: Jayne Michaels of New York City–based firm 2 Michaels opts for Farrow & Ball’s Setting Plaster: “The pigments are earthy, smudgy, and warm, without a hint of sweetness,” she says.
 Brooklyn firm Made has devised a favorite custom pink: a coat of Seashell low-sheen paint by Australian company Sydney Harbour, topped with a coat of their French Wash, which creates a mottled patina look.
Above: Brooklyn firm Made has devised a favorite custom pink: a coat of Seashell low-sheen paint by Australian company Sydney Harbour, topped with a coat of their French Wash, which creates a mottled patina look.
Another, more rosy, choice from Medium Plenty: Cinder Rose by Farrow & Ball.
Above: Another, more rosy, choice from Medium Plenty: Cinder Rose by Farrow & Ball.

Jon Call of Mr. Call Designs in New York City likes Valspar’s Pale Satin Peach, adding, “Fresh pinks like this bring a flush to the face and warmth to a room.”
Above: Jon Call of Mr. Call Designs in New York City likes Valspar’s Pale Satin Peach, adding, “Fresh pinks like this bring a flush to the face and warmth to a room.”
Marysia Rybock of Scavullo Design recommends Benjamin Moore&#8
Above: Marysia Rybock of Scavullo Design recommends Benjamin Moore’s Southern Charm. “I actually used this in my own bedroom several years ago,” she says. “Soft pink with a beige undertone. Very classic looking.”

And finally, the brightest of the picks: Michael Howell of Howells Architecture & Design in Portland, Oregon, suggests Benjamin Moore’s Coral Reef. A little bit of this shade goes a long way; consider using it as an unexpected accent, rather than a full wall.
Above: And finally, the brightest of the picks: Michael Howell of Howells Architecture & Design in Portland, Oregon, suggests Benjamin Moore’s Coral Reef. A little bit of this shade goes a long way; consider using it as an unexpected accent, rather than a full wall.

Not pictured: Marie Fisher Interior Design uses Rose Pále from Les Couleurs’ Le Corbusier collection of pigments.

For more on our top paint picks, head to our Palette & Paints tag page. And for more pink palettes, see:



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A Curated, One-Stop Source for Modern Hardware, from a Pair of Canadian Architects


One of the least-considered elements of a kitchen or bath remodel? Fixtures and fittings, which suddenly become an issue when you find yourself scrambling to source the perfect cabinet pull. Enter: Toronto company Casson, founded by Megan Cassidy and Jane Son, who met on their first day of architecture school at the University of Toronto in 1996. After many years of practice, they formed Casson Hardware in 2017.  As they say, “We were roommates as students, mothers of messy little boys, and conspiratorial friends to the end. We believe that great design begins with attention to the smaller details.”

Here’s a look at the offerings:

Above: Megan Cassidy (L) and Jane Son; “Our goal is to bring beautiful hardware to modern built environments.”
Above: The Catch-All Shelf from NakNak is made of steel with a powder-coated finish (available in Black, White, or Pink); $340.
Above: The Brassy Beau Top Mount Barn Door Hardware is designed and made in Toronto by local maker studio 1925Workbench; contact Casson for more information.
Above: The Tilde Pull Wall-Mounted Shelf by San Francisco-based Alice Tacheney is available with a satin brass or blackened brass pull.
Above: Bocci 22 is a suite of flush electrical accessories and plates for the most clean and minimal look for your walls. The Bocci 22 is plaster or tile mounting in white, black, and bone; go to Casson for more information.
Above: Unique and ethereal, Dutch designers Jeroen van de Gruiter’s latest collection showcases the artist’s provocative use of material and color; $CA445.
Above: Designed by Baccman Berglund and made in Sweden, the Curve Brass Toilet Holder is CA$135.

See more hardware finds from around the world:

Japanese Inflected Architectural Hardware from a Japanese Artisan



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DIY: A Mirror by Two Paris Architects (Made with Materials from the French Equivalent of Home Depot)


Hélène Pinaud and Julien Schwartzmann graduated from architecture school in Strasbourg in 2014 and promptly set up their own Paris firm, Heju. Operating out of their tiny garret apartment—we recently featured their $4,300 Kitchen Makeover—the couple became DIY experts out of necessity. They’re now so in-demand as architects that they they have less time to fiddle with scraps. But visits to Merlin Leroy, France’s version of Home Depot, occasionally lead to a new DIY. A recent project for their bathroom is this pivoting mirror that they describe as “a minimalist and geometric design inspired by Bauhaus shapes.” Hélène and Julien kindly agreed to explain how they put it together.

Photography by and courtesy of Heju.

DIY swivel mirror by Heju. Above: The mirror is supported by a brass rod inserted into a water-resistant MDF frame that doubles as a shelf. The mirror pivots “just enough,” the designers explain, “that you can tuck some beauty products behind it.”

Tools and Materials

Parts for the DIY swivel mirror by Heju. Above: Supplies are all from Leroy Merlin and require little more than assembling. They used a 42-centimeter round mirror and 1-meter-long brass rod, 8 millimeters in diameter. The frame is colored medium density fiberboard or MDF—in anthracite gray, so no painting or staining is needed—and the three pieces were cut to size at the store. (Unfortunately, colored MDF is harder to come by in the States; one source is ForesColor.) Go to Heju Miroir Pivotant for the exact specs.

Instructions

DIY swivel mirror in progress by Heju, Paris. Above: Drill 8-millimeter-wide holes into the top and bottom panels, 3.5 centimeters from the edge (one hole in the center and one at each end). Widen the holes as needed with your drill and screw the bottom panel to the back. N.B.: The designers recommend using black screws.
DIY swivel mirror by Heju, Paris, in progress. Above: If your supplier won’t cut a brass rod to size—53 centimeters long—use a hacksaw and sand the edges.
DIY swivel mirror by Heju, Paris, in progress. Above: The brass rod is centered and affixed to the mirror back: Hélène and Julien used a waterproof, transparent neoprene glue.
DIY swivel mirror by Heju, Paris, in progress. Above: Thread the rod through the top and bottom panel holes and then screw the top panel into place.
DIY swivel mirror by Heju, Paris, hangers being added. Above: Screw two sawtooth picture hangers to the back panel, and “you can proudly hang your mirror.”

The Finished Look

DIY swivel mirror by Heju. Above: The shelf is just big enough to display a few pretty items.

Explore our DIY Archive for many more projects, including these three by Heju:

  • DIY: A Homemade Terrazzo Table
  • DIY: A Summery Side Table and Plant Stand
  • DIY: The Heju Brass Wall Organizer

And check out our Steal This Look: The Heju DIY Tiny Kitchen Makeover.



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Kitchen of the Week: A London Architect’s Sky-Lit Compact Kitchen


We love every inch of this compact 14-by-10-foot kitchen in the Peckham neighborhood of London. Designed by architect Jonathan Nicholls and his partner, Alex Randall, a lighting designer, it occupies the rear extension of their Victorian home. While many architects find the experience of designing their own home an existential nightmare, Nicholls found it be quite the opposite:

“As an architect, working on your own house is great fun. Because of time constraints, I didn’t get a chance to do full, proper drawings, so a lot of the time I’d scribble some plans on the wall at night for the builders to interpret a few hours later,” he told The Modern House. “Because it was our own house, I could experiment a lot more with things I wouldn’t risk at work.”

Nowhere is that playful spirit more on display than in their artful kitchen.

Let’s take a tour. (To see the rest of their house, see the listing at The Modern House.)

Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: When the couple moved in five years ago, the kitchen was on the top of their list of rooms to redesign as they both love to cook.
Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: The cabinets are one of Nicholls’ “experiments.” “We weren’t entirely sure how it would turn out, but it’s beautiful,” he said of the engineered-ash plywood joinery.
Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: The most whimsical feature in the kitchen, though, may be the skylight that not only funnels in natural light but also offers a glimpse at the wildflowers growing on the roof garden.
Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: In lieu of upper cabinets, a single wall-mounted shelf holding cooking tools and decorative touches extends across the length of one wall.
Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: A stainless steel sink with an integrated draining board. (See The New Art Gallery: 12 Favorite Kitchens with Paintings on Display.)
Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: Steel and glass doors by Crittal usher in even more natural light from the patio.
Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: Limestone tiles extend from the entrance, down the hallway, and into the kitchen. The rest of the house enjoys oiled-oak floorboards.
Blenheim Grove London Kitchen of the Week by Jonathan Nicholls of Hayhurst & Co. Above: The patio just beyond the kitchen has a surprisingly tropical feel thanks to a palm tree and bamboo. (See 10 Things Nobody Tells You About Bamboo.)

For more plywood kitchens, see:

  • Steal This Look: A Stylish Camp Kitchen in a Plywood Summer Cabin
  • Plykea in London: Stylish Plywood Cabinet Fronts and Worktops for Ikea Kitchens
  • Kitchen of the Week: A Cost-Conscious Kitchen in Sweden



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