A sure-fire sign that a designer and a client are sympatico? When the client asks for the exact same furniture and lighting that the designer has in her own home.

“She purchased her place and saw a photo of my Brooklyn home, and she said she immediately bought the chairs and light that I had—and then realized she needed my help and gave me a call,” explains designer Delia Kenza, of how she came to be hired.

“The client’s vibe inspired the project. She appreciates things made by hand, prefers a vintage organic vibe over stark, and has beautiful pieces she either inherited or purchased,” says Delia. “She has a real sense of what she likes and does not like.” On the like list: the grand proportions, large windows, and pre-war architectural details of her two-bedroom apartment. On the dislike list: the kitchen.

Now that Delia has applied her considerable design talents to the space, her client—”a real bad-ass (and I mean that in a good way) professional woman”—has a home that marries old with new, bold with refined, and Delia’s curatorial eye with the client’s personality.

Below, Delia takes us on a tour of the refreshed home, now as “bad-ass” as her client.

Photography by Nick Glimenkis, courtesy of Delia Kenza Interiors.

To give the pre-war apartment a more modern feel, Delia had all the walls and millwork painted a super-pale gray. &#8
Above: To give the pre-war apartment a more modern feel, Delia had all the walls and millwork painted a super-pale gray. “What I like to do, especially in smaller spaces, is wrap the entire room in one color so you can’t tell the difference between the wall and ceiling. I also use the same finish on the walls and trim,” says Delia.
Delia mixes new and vintage pieces in the living room. A West Elm sectional plays nice with two vintage leather chairs handed down from the client&#8
Above: Delia mixes new and vintage pieces in the living room. A West Elm sectional plays nice with two vintage leather chairs handed down from the client’s father.



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