Modern Thrift: Lucile Demory’s Architect-Designed Rental in Paris


When Lucile Demory moved back to Paris after a stint in Philadelphia, she was lucky enough to find an architect-designed rental loft at the end of a courtyard, in the 10th Arrondissement (a friend’s sister happened to be moving out at the same time). Lucile moved in right away but changed very little. It’s the decor that stands out. Lucile—like her sister, creative director Clarisse Demory—has an offbeat yet refined style that has been developed over decades of thrift store collecting and unaffected by the vagaries of Insta-trends. Join us for a tour.

Photography by Claire Cottrell for Remodelista.

The loft, in a 90s building by commercial architects Fassio-Viaud, once functioned as a counterfeit handbag workshop. Lucile and Michel added floor-to-ceiling curtains and potted plants for privacy.
Above: The loft, in a 1990s building by commercial architects Fassio-Viaud, once functioned as a counterfeit handbag workshop. Lucile and Michel added floor-to-ceiling curtains and potted plants for privacy.
The inset coco mat came with the apartment. Lucile and Michel created an instant entryway with a white-painted peg rail.
Above: The inset coco mat came with the apartment. Lucile and Michel created an instant entryway with a white-painted peg rail.
Lucile couldn’t find a neutral area rug that she liked so, instead, she had a carpet custom cut and added a binding.
Above: Lucile couldn’t find a neutral area rug that she liked so, instead, she had a carpet custom cut and added a binding.
The sofa and ottoman are part of a 60s daybed set by French designer Pierre Chapo. The lamp is a Spirale Desk Lamp by Ingo Maurer for Design M.
Above: The sofa and ottoman are part of a 1960s daybed set by French designer Pierre Chapo. The lamp is a Spirale Desk Lamp by Ingo Maurer for Design M.
Lucile bought the glass coffee table for €5 at a thrift store in Vaulx-Vraucourt, a town in northern France where her mother lives. On the coffee table is a Raku ceramic tile, a found sculpture, and A.P.C. Transmission, the new book by Jean Touitou.
Above: Lucile bought the glass coffee table for €5 at a thrift store in Vaulx-Vraucourt, a town in northern France where her mother lives. On the coffee table is a Raku ceramic tile, a found sculpture, and A.P.C. Transmission, the new book by Jean Touitou.
Lucile on the Pierre Chapo; she wears an A.P.C. Italian lamb&#8
Above: Lucile on the Pierre Chapo; she wears an A.P.C. Italian lamb’s wool sweater. For more on her personal style, visit Unfussy French Girl Style with Lucile Demory.
A 90s halogen floor lamp of Michel’s illuminates a corner; the speakers are from Focal and the turntable is a Technics data-src=
Above: A 1990s halogen floor lamp of Michel’s illuminates a corner; the speakers are from Focal and the turntable is a Technics 1210MK2. Albums are filed in an Ikea Kallax shelving unit, a favorite among record collectors. For more ideas, see 10 Easy Pieces: DJ-Approved Home Stereo Equipment.
The two vintage leather poufs are from a Paris thrift store.
Above: The two vintage leather poufs are from a Paris thrift store.
Two side-by-side pine Ivar Shelving Units from Ikea hold Lucile’s things, from “years of collecting”: glassware from Emmaüs, France’s chain of charity shops, and Philly AIDS Thrift; ceramics by Lucile herself or by friend and artist Cécile Daladier; and a wood-base table lamp from resale site leboncoin.fr.
Above: Two side-by-side pine Ivar Shelving Units from Ikea hold Lucile’s things, from “years of collecting”: glassware from Emmaüs, France’s chain of charity shops, and Philly AIDS Thrift; ceramics by Lucile herself or by friend and artist Cécile Daladier; and a wood-base table lamp from resale site leboncoin.fr.
The white vase with fingerprints is by Lucile.
Above: The white vase with fingerprints is by Lucile.
A sturdy speckled vase brought back from Philadelphia and a stack of ordinary white plates mixed with ceramic dishes.
Above: A sturdy speckled vase brought back from Philadelphia and a stack of ordinary white plates mixed with ceramic dishes.
Glassware in shades of amber, pink, and green.
Above: Glassware in shades of amber, pink, and green.
A fig galette baked by Lucile atop a table of unknown origin that “folds into a mini console.” The silver tray was Michel’s, and Lucile’s sister Clarisse bought the chairs from a Belgian antiques website.
Above: A fig galette baked by Lucile atop a table of unknown origin that “folds into a mini console.” The silver tray was Michel’s, and Lucile’s sister Clarisse bought the chairs from a Belgian antiques website.
A view from the kitchen into the two-tiered living/dining space.
Above: A view from the kitchen into the two-tiered living/dining space.
Lucile and Michel keep the small kitchen spare. On the counter are two stoneware cook pots, bought at a thrift store. The bread on the counter is from Paris bakery Du Pain et Des Idées.
Above: Lucile and Michel keep the small kitchen spare. On the counter are two stoneware cook pots, bought at a thrift store. The bread on the counter is from Paris bakery Du Pain et Des Idées.
A steel handrail is one of the many timeless architectural details added by Fassio-Viaud. Lucile and Michel use one edge of the stairs to store their shoes.
Above: A steel handrail is one of the many timeless architectural details added by Fassio-Viaud. Lucile and Michel use one edge of the stairs to store their shoes.
Lucile and Michel installed the alabaster wall lamp when they moved in. An uncommon color pairing—dark blue and green—is a theme, from throw pillows to candles and vases.
Above: Lucile and Michel installed the alabaster wall lamp when they moved in. An uncommon color pairing—dark blue and green—is a theme, from throw pillows to candles and vases.
A vintage yellow side table fits between the bed and built-in shelves.
Above: A vintage yellow side table fits between the bed and built-in shelves.
Lucile bought the green pillar candle from Vellas Loreto, a church candle shop in Lisbon, Portugal. The blue glass tube vase is, again, from a thrift store, and holds a single stem of pampas grass. The bowl is a half dried calabash (a type of gourd).
Above: Lucile bought the green pillar candle from Vellas Loreto, a church candle shop in Lisbon, Portugal. The blue glass tube vase is, again, from a thrift store, and holds a single stem of pampas grass. The bowl is a half dried calabash (a type of gourd).
Clarisse gave Lucile the school chair, one of a batch she sourced for a restaurant design, and the poster from a 73 Iranian painters exhibition.
Above: Clarisse gave Lucile the school chair, one of a batch she sourced for a restaurant design, and the poster from a 1973 Iranian painters exhibition.
Planted and potted trees create a privacy shield.
Above: Planted and potted trees create a privacy shield.
A view of the gated courtyard shows how the modern Fassio-Viaud structure to the rear contrasts with the traditional, historic Parisian architecture.
Above: A view of the gated courtyard shows how the modern Fassio-Viaud structure to the rear contrasts with the traditional, historic Parisian architecture.

For more on Lucile (and her sister, Clarisse), see our posts:



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Steal This Look: An Interior Designer’s High/Low Scandi Living Room, Ikea Sofa included


Last month, Holly Marder, an interior designer and co-founder of Avenue Design Studio, shared her recently renovated home in Delft with our readers. (Missed the story? Go here.) We loved it so much, we’re revisiting one of our favorite moments from the house tour: the living room.

“The goal in this extended space,” she wrote on her Instagram post, “was to create a luminous, light-filled living area that feels spacious despite its humble size, with plenty of contrast and materiality to counterbalance its pared-back sensibilities.” We think she nailed it.

Photography by Holly Marder.

The dining room is open to the living space. The couple reconfigured the lower floor to improve flow and maximize space and light.
Above: The dining room is open to the living space. The couple reconfigured the lower floor to improve flow and maximize space and light.
Holly confidently mixes an Ikea sofa with vintage finds for an unfussy but polished look.
Above: Holly confidently mixes an Ikea sofa with vintage finds for an unfussy but polished look.
A modular and streamlined storage system, mounted to the wall, is part media console, part bookcase.
Above: A modular and streamlined storage system, mounted to the wall, is part media console, part bookcase.
The key to achieving Holly&#8
Above: The key to achieving Holly’s Scandi/mid-century look is to not over-decorate.

Here’s what you need to recreate the look in your own home:

Furniture

The Era Round Armchair with Cane Seat by Thonet is $395 at DWR.
Above: The Era Round Armchair with Cane Seat by Thonet is $395 at DWR.
A favorite of designers, Ikea&#8
Above: A favorite of designers, Ikea’s Söderhamn Sofa is just $810. Holly’s has a custom slipcover; see below for details.
Above: Munk Collective’s Climb Shelves are modular and can be mounted to the wall or stand on their own on the floor. They come in oak and walnut (shown) and start at DKK 1,186 for a small nightstand size.
Monolith marble coffee tables are staging a comeback (see the Plinth Coffee Table for an example of a new interpretation), but there are plenty of vintage versions, like Holly&#8
Above: Monolith marble coffee tables are staging a comeback (see the Plinth Coffee Table for an example of a new interpretation), but there are plenty of vintage versions, like Holly’s, on the market. We found a bunch on 1stdibs, including this Oval Italian Design Marble Table for $4,642.
For a similar lounge chair, try Industry West&#8
Above: For a similar lounge chair, try Industry West’s ash wood Cane Lounge Chair; $950.

Lighting

Hanging over Holly&#8
Above: Hanging over Holly’s dining table is Michael Anastassiades’s IC S2 Pendant; $795 at DWR.
Hay&#8
Above: Hay’s large Rice Paper Shade comes in three sizes; from $20.85 at Finnish Design Shop.
The Parentesi Suspension Light starts at $595 at Lumens.
Above: The Parentesi Suspension Light starts at $595 at Lumens.

Textiles

Above: A pack of two Linen Curtain Panels, in beige, is $99 at H&M.
Holly covers her couch with the Söderhamn 3 Seater Sofa Cover, in Brera Lino fabric, from Bemz. (For more about Bemz, see 5 Companies That Make It Easy to Upgrade Your Ikea Sofa.)
Above: Holly covers her couch with the Söderhamn 3 Seater Sofa Cover, in Brera Lino fabric, from Bemz. (For more about Bemz, see 5 Companies That Make It Easy to Upgrade Your Ikea Sofa.)
Above: Tensira makes some of our favorite throwbeds (see 7 Favorites: Soft, Stylish Throwbeds (Starting at $50), and, it turns out, they also make pillows. The Grid Throw Pillow is $175; the Grid Headboard Cushion is $275, both at Sunday Shop.
Holly&#8
Above: Holly’s rug is part of Avenue Design’s studio collection (email [email protected] for purchasing inquiries). The Bronte Natural Textured Jute Rug at Crate & Barrel is a similar rug; from $299.

Decor

Above: Bloomist carries a variety of artful vessels in neutral palettes. Their European Recycled Glass Jars come in several sizes; from $64. Vases by ceramicist Paul Dinetz start at $88.

Paint

The walls are painted Farrow & Ball&#8
Above: The walls are painted Farrow & Ball’s Strong White; $110. Photograph by Mel Walbridge for Remodelista.

For more neutral palettes, see:



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House & Home


In this Ask A Designer column, Jennifer Koper shares her ideas for making an awkward living-dining room more polished.

Jennifer KoperQuestion: The angled wall in my living room has me stumped, and I’m not sure what to put on my bare walls. Could you help me with furniture and lighting? T.M., Dawson Creek, B.C.

ask a designer awkward living-dining-room

Answer: You’re on the right track with your deep wall color, but the bare walls make the room fall a bit flat. A wonderful way to add architectural interest and texture to a space is to invest in built-in bookcases. Consider having shallow, wraparound built-ins made for both long living room walls, as well as the angled wall. Paint the bookcases the same dark hue and fill the shelves with books, art and decorative objets. Be sure to vary the “fullness” of each shelf to avoid a look that’s packed too tight. Treating all three walls the same way will also help disguise the awkward angle.

ask a designer living-dining room

Next, update your sofa with a contemporary charcoal-colored version with subtle texture. The tone-on-tone effect of the sofa, walls and bookcases will create a snug, cocooned feeling. Consider choosing a sofa that’s slightly less deep than your current one to gain back some of the space that will be taken up by the new bookcases.

ask a designer sofa

(Source: Kimberly Sofa in Midnight by Distinctly Home, $1,599, thebay.com)

I recommend swapping out your love seat for two luxurious club chairs in a channelled black leather.

ask a designer chair

(Source: Schuler Club Chair, $999, shelterfurniture.ca)

Then, add a smoked glass coffee table for a modern touch; the glass, although tinted, will make the table feel lighter.

ask a designer coffee table

(Source: Verre Square Coffee Table in Grey, $599, eq3.com)

A round wooden accent table placed between the club chairs and a nubby wool rug underfoot will bring in a touch of warmth.

ask a designer rug side table

(Source: Trill Round Wood Side Table, $499, cb2.ca)

ask a designer rug

(Source: Hand-Woven Chunky Woolen Cable Rug in Off-White by NuLoom, $444, homedepot.ca)

In your adjoining dining area, replace the exposed bulb fixture with a more streamlined shaded version that will cast a softer glow. Its classic style will also temper the more modern pieces in the living area.

ask a designer light fixture

(Source: Piaf 39 Inch 4 Light Chandelier by Thomas O’Brien for Visual Comfort, $1,467, robinsonlightingcentre.com)

This mix of textures and styles will add plenty of interest to your space and give you a cozy but dynamic room, perfect for relaxing or entertaining.

Do you have a design dilemma? Send your questions to askadesigner@hhmedia.com.



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10 Easy Pieces: Neutral Area Rugs Under $1,000


I’ve been in the market for a good area rug for years. In fact, I’ve never owned one. I’ve always been lucky with good-enough wood flooring to sit with my indecision—and without a living room rug. The trouble is: area rugs are expensive. It’s a massive commitment, taking up 9 by 12 feet in a room and costing thousands of dollars. If you’re looking to spend under $1k on an area rug, but would still like one fairly well made and neutral in tone, here is our list of favorites.

The Stoense Low Pile Rug in Medium Grey, size 6&#8
Above: The Stoense Low Pile Rug in Medium Grey, size 6’7″ x 9’10” is only $149 at IKEA.
The Alder Rug from Room & Board comes in four neutral colors from light to dark; $999 for the largest area rug size.
Above: The Alder Rug from Room & Board comes in four neutral colors from light to dark; $999 for the largest area rug size.
From Schoolhouse, the Ribbed Wool Rug in ivory is a hearty, textured rug made from 0-percent wool; $999 for the 9&#8
Above: From Schoolhouse, the Ribbed Wool Rug in ivory is a hearty, textured rug made from 100-percent wool; $999 for the 9′ x 12′ size.
Currently on sale, the ABC Carpet & Home Contemporary Wool Rug is $data-src=
Above: Currently on sale, the ABC Carpet & Home Contemporary Wool Rug is $1,000 (normally $1,600) for the 9′ x 12′ size.
The Blake Handwoven Jute Rug is woven with two tones of natural jute; $899 for the area rug (9&#8
Above: The Blake Handwoven Jute Rug is woven with two tones of natural jute; $899 for the area rug (9′ x 12′ size) at CB2.
The IKEA Morum Flatweave Rug comes in only up to a size 6&#8
Above: The IKEA Morum Flatweave Rug comes in only up to a size 6’7″ x 9’10” for $99. IKEA offers additional colors in the Morum style as well.
Crate & Barrel&#8
Above: Crate & Barrel’s Sisal Grey Rug (it also comes in four other neutral colors) is $599.
Ferm Living&#8
Above: Ferm Living’s Shade Loop Rug is a tufted beige wool rug for €609 at Ferm Living.
The HAY Raw Rug is smaller than most area rugs (its largest size is 7&#8
Above: The HAY Raw Rug is smaller than most area rugs (its largest size is 7′ x 10′) and comes in five colors. Here, the Dark Grey Rug is $795 at HAY.
The Nantucket Rug in Nickel (shown) or Blue, is a simple striped flatweave rug made of wool and nylon; $798 for the 9&#8
Above: The Nantucket Rug in Nickel (shown) or Blue, is a simple striped flatweave rug made of wool and nylon; $798 for the 9′ x 12′ size at Serena & Lily.
The IKEA Tyvelse Rug Low Pile Rug in 6&#8
Above: The IKEA Tyvelse Rug Low Pile Rug in 6’7″ x 9’10” is $179. It’s also available in blue and black at IKEA.
West Elm&#8
Above: West Elm’s Tweed Flatweave Dhurrie Rug comes in Iron (shown) and Dark Horseradish (a beige-camel color) for $699.

Shopping for more rug styles or price points? See our posts:



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A Rising-Star Architect Casts Her Own Brooklyn Townhouse in Pinks, Greens, and Grays


What happens when two young architects get to be their own clients? Budget constraints are, of course, a given–so things like learning how to hang wallpaper come into play. So does treating the house as a treasure hunt, and finding out what’s hiding under the carpets and painted mantels. And, of course, experimenting yourself with the transformative power of paint.

That’s but a sampling of what took place when, after a year of real estate hunting, Andrea Fisk and her partner, James Klauder, got to overhaul their own late-19th century townhouse in Brooklyn’s Bushwick. “The structure had been barely altered since it was built, which was very appealing to us,” says Andrea, pointing out its original plaster crown moldings, Eastlake-style door and window frames, and lavishly carved stair. But there was also much to do, including flipping the arrangement of the floors: to help pay their mortgage, the couple turned the garden level into a rental apartment. They restored the parlor floor as a living space—it had previously been divided into bedrooms—and reinstated bedrooms on the top floor.

Andrea is co-founder with Jess Thomas of Shapeless Studio, a rising Brooklyn firm with a focus on residential work, and James specializes transportation and aviation designs at Gensler. So Andrea took the lead on the project, and, as with Jess’s own place—see The Sentimental Minimalist—the results serve as a showcase for the work they can do. Come see.

Photography by Hagan Hinshaw of Blurry Hinge, courtesy of Shapeless Studio.

Above L: The couple tiled the entry in a pattern called Agadir from the Cement Tile Shop and painted the walls and door in Benjamin Moore Arctic Seal: “lighter colors make boundaries more visible, so going with a dark color in a small space can have the effect of dematerializing the volume of the room,” explains James. Above R: A glimpse of the living room.”During the construction, we found a funny foundation block signed ‘Sam, Mike, Mickey, 1891,’ so we think they were the builders,” says Andrea, adding “1891 makes sense because we have Eastlake Victorian details and also some touches of Arts & Crafts, and that year was right on the verge between those styles.”

“We were first-time homeowners and right after our closing, I went down a rabbit hole of trying to learn everything I could about our house’s history. It’s so much older than we are and has seen several generations of New Yorkers come and go; I felt as if we had to respect that. In the 1900 census, the house was owned by a husband and wife who had been born in Ireland; they had five adult daughters and a son living with them, all of whom worked as bookkeepers and dressmakers. By 1940, there was a different family of six, and the father was a watchman for WPA projects. We’re excited to be part of the house’s story.”

Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse living room, Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above:  For Andrea the most magical moment of the renovation was “early on, when we stripped dozens of layers of paint from the three original fireplace mantels and a gorgeous green and pink slate emerged. This uncovered stone became the inspiration for our color palette: deep greens, dusty pinks, and cool grays.”

The room is painted Benjamin Moore Lost Locket—and note that that includes the ceiling and crown moldings for an immersive effect. For cohesion throughout, the window and door frames are called out in white. All of the house’s paints are from Benjamin Moore’s Color Stories collection from its Aura line

Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above: The room is flooded with natural light thanks to its 7.6-foot-tall, 6-foot-wide window. “We wanted our furniture to have a very casual feeling; it gets constantly moved around depending on what we’re doing,” says Andrea. The Large Gray Round Pouf is by Ferm Living, and the Dune Sofa is from Industry West. The shelving is CB2’s Stairway Bookcase.

Above L: The nuanced color of the slate mantels and their plant motifs served as inspiration for the whole remodel. Above R: The sofa is upholstered in green velvet.

Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse powder room, Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above: The aforementioned crash course in wallpapering was for the powder room, now cloaked in Cole & Son’s exuberant Singita pattern, one of the first elements selected for the house and an encapsulation of the colors used throughout. “Wallpapering is hard work,” says Andrea. “We would hang two panels and then stop for the day; I think it took us six weeks to finish.”

The “self-rimming” sink is the Yeni Klasik from Nameek’s, and the print is by Brooklyn street artist Pixote.

Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse TV room, Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above: Each room is painted a different color—”the palette all goes together, but each space has its own character,” explains Andrea. The dusky purple TV room, shown here, is in Benjamin Moore Soho Loft. Hanging above the made-for-lounging Gray Sofa is a screen print called Ellipsis by British artist Dan Hillier. The rug is the Walkabout by Lori Weitzner, a discontinued West Elm design.
Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse dining room, Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above: There’s also a proper dining room divided from the living rooms by pocket doors. “I’m a big fan of separating the dining area from the kitchen when possible,” says Andrea. “I don’t enjoy doing dishes, and I don’t want to look at them while I’m eating.”

This room is in Benjamin Moore Lilac Hush, “which seems to change from blue to pink depending on the lighting,” says Andrea. The rug is an over-dyed vintage Turkish design from Revival Rug in a dark green selected to”help the slate mantel pop, and to also tie the room to the living room’s emerald sofa,” explains Andrea. Ferm Living’s Mingle Table in charcoal linoleum—”we love linoleum”—and DWR’s Note Chairs were selected to ground the space.

Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse kitchen, Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above: The couple added a kitchen to the parlor floor, framed here by moldings painted Benjamin Moore’s Vanilla Milkshake, the color used throughout. They uncovered the pine subfloor by removing layers of vinyl, tile, and carpeting.
Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse kitchen, Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above: Shapeless Studio’s go-to millworker, James Harmon of Workshop Brooklyn, built the cabinets, which are painted Benjamin Moore Blacktop and have a soapstone counter and integrated soapstone sink. Andrea says she’s learned to leave the soapstone as is and allow it  to develop a patina—”but it’s taking some patience” (see our post Soapstone Counters: Are They Worth It?)

The pull-down faucet is the Delta Trinsic. The backsplash is Daltile’s Keystone Mosaics, a 2-by-4-inch porcelain tile with a slight texture that gets picked out in the light.

Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse kitchen, Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above: The couple saved by supplying Harmon with a detailed set of cabinet drawings, something he’d ordinarily do himself. “But it was risky because if we got a dimension wrong, it would have been our fault,” they say. “James installed them and then we took all of the doors off and painted them.”

The range is the Blomberg 30-inch Pro Style, and the vent, the Prestige Compact Insert, is built into the shelf that runs the length of the room.

Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse period stair, Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above: “The woodwork on the staircase was one of the reasons we fell in love with the house,” says Andrea. “I hadn’t ever seen a railing like this with all the horizontal pieces.” To highlight its detailing, they painted the walls, as they did the entry, in Benjamin Moore Arctic Seal.
Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse bedroom, Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above: The palette shifts to paler shades upstairs. The master bedroom, shown here, is  in Benjamin Moore Picket Fence. Says Andrea: “Benjamin Moore’s Aura colors have more pigment—they don’t use any straight white or black to lighten or darken, it’s all pigment, so there are really interesting undertones, especially in the lighter shades.”

Andrea’s father built the bedside tables. The Linen Duvet Cover is from Two Dawson.

Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse bedroom, Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above:  The mantel is one of the three that they stripped of many layers of paint”using a horrible, noxious goo.” The pendant light was a Craigslist find.

The room is in the back of the house and overlooks the giant hemlock tree in the yard.

Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse bedroom, Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above: The dresser is West Elm’s Modernist Wood and Lacquer Three-Drawer design, currently available only in a pale wood.
Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse master bath, Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above: Like the entry, the bathroom has a black-and-white floor of Agadir Cement Tile: “If I could change one thing, I would instead go with large-honed slate tile,” Andrea tells us. “After finishing our project, I discovered a few slate companies in Upstate NY and Vermont that sell the exact same green splotchy slate that our fireplaces are made of.  That would have been so lovely, especially with the mix of white wall tiles. Sometimes it’s hard being an architect; I am constantly redesigning my surroundings in my mind.”
Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse master bath, Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above: The walls are tiled in Daltile’s Metro Collection squares in a mix of glossy whites. James Harmon fabricated the vanity to the couples’ design; it has a Corian sink by Grifform; all of the black plumbing fixtures are from California Faucets’ Tiburon collection.
Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse bedroom, Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above: The west-facing guest room initially served as Shapeless Studio’s office during the firm’s first year. The bed is the Nesttun frame and the shelf is the Fjalkinge, both from Ikea.
Shapeless Studio architect Andrea Fisk townhouse home office, Brooklyn. Hagan Hinshaw photo. Above: The small space off the bedroom—where Benjamin Moore Arctic Seal puts in another appearance—is now Andrea’s painting studio. The bedroom’s pale walls are in Benjamin Moore’s Grandma’s China, which, Andrea says, “really glows with orange undertones when the sun sets. On dark and rainy days, it looks a lot more greenish. I love living in a house that seems to experience the same moodiness I do.”

We recently featured a Shapeless Studio Kitchen Designed Around the Keywords ‘Socal’ and ‘Minimal but Warm.’

Here are more architects’ own quarters:

  • The Strange House in London
  • A Tree Grows in Brooklyn: Fabr Studio in East Williamsburg
  • Elizabeth Roberts at Home: The Architect’s Own Beach House in Bellport, NY
  • Two Young Architects Tackle a Townhouse for Themselves



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