Kitchen of the Week: A Photographer’s Flexible Studio Kitchen in Ojai Valley


There’s a slim category of kitchens that embodies everything we think a kitchen workspace should be—equal parts functional and beautiful—and it’s the photographer’s studio kitchen. These spaces must be practical and usable, with efficient storage and clever shape-shifting solutions. But, as backdrops for photographs of lush entertaining spreads and heaping bowls of food, they must also be clean-lined and aspirational. (Just take a look at this one in Berkeley we featured a few months back.) The photo studio kitchen is flooded with natural light, flexible, and, often, with a photographer’s eye behind the design, especially artful.

This is particularly the case with photographer Victoria Pearson‘s studio, an outbuilding beside her house in California’s Ojai Valley that doubles as guest quarters (and which we first spotted over on Rip & Tan). When Pearson first moved into the main house, she rented out the small building—then strictly a guest house—to the existing tenants for a while, then renovated it top to bottom, transforming it into photo studio by day and guest space when needed, focusing especially on re-making the kitchen into a workable and beautiful backdrop for Pearson’s photography. (In addition to magazines like Travel + Leisure and Martha Stewart publications, you may have spotted her work in the cookbook Citrus: Sweet and Savory Sun-Kissed Recipes.)

“It is a perfect studio,” says Pearson of the space, and it happens to be an airy, thoughtful living space, too. Join us for a look.

Photography by Victoria Pearson.

Before work began, the outbuilding had &#8
Above: Before work began, the outbuilding had “a sleeping loft and, strangely, three bathrooms,” Pearson says.

To make the small building more efficient, Pearson downsized from three bathrooms to one large one and took out the loft. Then she set in on transforming the space from pure guesthouse to a working photo studio, replacing all of the glass with non-tinted glass (“it’s usually a green tint,” she says), adding barn doors for easy access to the garden, replacing the Spanish-style tile floors with cement, and painting the interior in, as she says, “plain white white.”

The priority, though, was re-doing the existing kitchen to optimize it for shooting. Pearson opted for an open plan that can be made even more open or moved around during shoots; everything is lightweight or on wheels. The kitchen is a high-low mix: a Viking stove and Miele dishwasher mixed with a quirky rattan lamp and Frosta stacking stools (a Remodelista favorite), both from Ikea. “I collect the good pieces,” she says of Ikea; “anything woven, wicker, or rattan”.

Open shelves display Pearson&#8
Above: Open shelves display Pearson’s collections of glassware and ceramics, used to style her photography. Her sources? “I love flea markets, thrift stores, and estate sales. I’ve brought back things from all over my travels,” she says. The coffee cups shown here are a mix of Mt. Washington Pottery and local Ojai ceramicist Mark Churchill.
Restaurant-style metal shelves on casters add significant storage for props, bakeware, and utensils, but can be rolled away to clear the room for a shot. The kitchen opens directly onto Pearson&#8
Above: Restaurant-style metal shelves on casters add significant storage for props, bakeware, and utensils, but can be rolled away to clear the room for a shot. The kitchen opens directly onto Pearson’s gardens.
A slim workspace, with a clean-lined desk and stool, fits next to the KitchenAid fridge, along with a low credenza on wheels for easy transportation while shooting.
Above: A slim workspace, with a clean-lined desk and stool, fits next to the KitchenAid fridge, along with a low credenza on wheels for easy transportation while shooting.

Pearson opted for rattan and natural-fiber details throughout the studio, from baskets to the daybed in the living area—for looks, but also for portability. “Everything in the studio needs to be easily moveable,” she says. “I sometimes clear the space for a photo shoot, or have it furnished for family and friends visiting.”

Case in point: An open lounge area is kept sparse, with a glass cabinet serving as storage for more props, and a low daybed from Elsie Green. &#8
Above: Case in point: An open lounge area is kept sparse, with a glass cabinet serving as storage for more props, and a low daybed from Elsie Green. “It’s covered in French ticking that I kept for 20 years waiting for the perfect project,” Pearson says. The Malm fireplace “replaced a cast-iron wood burning stove,” she says.

Pearson’s fine art photography, which she shoots in addition to commercial work, hangs on the walls. “I love the idea of Tabula Rasa: blank slate. I want images that you can interpret for yourself,” she says.

The added outdoor shower, paved with natural stones. Not shown: the studio&#8
Above: The added outdoor shower, paved with natural stones. Not shown: the studio’s bedroom. “I don’t sleep in the studio, but I do come over to use the outdoor shower in the winter,” Pearson says.

Follow Pearson’s work on Instagram at @victoriapearsonphotographer and @tabularasapicture.

Take a look at a few more California kitchens:



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Kitchen of the Week: A Photographer’s Light-Flooded Shaker-Scandi Carriage Studio


The first thing one learns in any introduction to photography class is that capturing images with a camera is all about light—the presence of it, the absence of it, the quality of it. Which is why when Vancouver-based photographer Gillian Stevens convinced her parents to turn a carriage house in their backyard into her own photo studio, foremost on her mind was how to get more light into the space.

“There was not very much natural light. It was a practical and cozy space but not really inspiring in any way,” says Gillian of the original structure, which was once a garage. Her solution? Gut the thing. “We added a ton of natural light through large glass patio doors, increased the window size in the kitchen, and added windows to the living and bathroom.”

Speaking of the windows, they are 100-year-old antique windows sourced by her dad through Craigslist for $80. “We had them restored locally, and they completely transform the feeling of the cottage,” says Gillian.

See for yourself. (And to rent the space for a photo shoot or event, go here.)

Photography by Gillian Stevens.

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Above: “The inspiration for the studio is a mix of classic British interiors mixed with Scandinavian minimalism,” says Gillian. “The purpose for the carriage studio is photography, so it was completely designed with that in mind: soft neutral colors, textures, and as much natural light as possible.”
Gillian designed the Shaker-inspired cabinets herself and worked with her contractor, Greycor, to bring them to life. On the walls is &#8
Above: Gillian designed the Shaker-inspired cabinets herself and worked with her contractor, Greycor, to bring them to life. On the walls is “Smooth Stone” by CIL, which Gillian had color-matched at Benjamin Moore. The cabinets and ceilings are painted “Stoneware” by Benjamin Moore. The Atlin Table is by Lock & Mortice.
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Above: “The biggest splurge was the Carrara marble countertop. It was the one element of the kitchen I wasn’t willing to compromise on—and I think it ties everything together,” says Gillian. The antique faucets were scored on Etsy.
All the lighting in the studio—including the globe pendant, the kitchen sconces, and the lighting in the bathroom—are by Cedar & Moss.
Above: All the lighting in the studio—including the globe pendant, the kitchen sconces, and the lighting in the bathroom—are by Cedar & Moss.
Beautiful light refracted through the antique windows. The Georg Bench is from Skagerak Denmark
Above: Beautiful light refracted through the antique windows. The Georg Bench is from Skagerak Denmark
A perfect nook for a bed. The shelf was custom-made by Will Morrison Studio; the bedding is by Last Light Collection.
Above: A perfect nook for a bed. The shelf was custom-made by Will Morrison Studio; the bedding is by Last Light Collection.
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Above: “The bathroom faucets and taps are a DIY that was originally inspired by a post on Remodelista. I hunted down the components, which I found are quite standard in the UK but not really available in North America. I had our contractor work his magic to make the valves fit with our copper piping (found at Home Depot),” shares Gillian. The Carissa bathtub is by Wyndham Collection, from Home Depot.
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Above: “I love how the faucets turned out, and the entire thing was incredible affordable. It’s a favorite feature among our renters!”

Before

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Above: “You can see it’s come a long way!” says Gillian of the before shot of the kitchen.

To see Gillian’s work on Remodelista, see:

And for more Scandi kitchens, see:



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Steal This Look: A Remodelista’s Minimalist Galley Kitchen in Brooklyn Heights


When my husband, Josh, and I moved to Brooklyn Heights a couple of years ago, we were lucky enough to find a parlor floor flat that hadn’t been updated for a couple of decades, so it was a blank slate. The kitchen in particular needed work, so we called on our friend Malachi Connolly, a New York/Cape Cod-based architect, preservationist, and longtime board member of the Cape Cod Modern House Trust to oversee the renovation. Here’s how to get the look:

Photography by Matthew Williams, with styling by Alexa Hotz, for Remodelista.

My inspiration for the kitchen was English couturier Anna Valentine’s London apartment, which we featured on Remodelista a couple of years ago (see Kitchen of the Week: A Culinary Space Inspired by a Painting).
Above: My inspiration for the kitchen was English couturier Anna Valentine’s London apartment, which we featured on Remodelista a couple of years ago (see Kitchen of the Week: A Culinary Space Inspired by a Painting).
We turned to Brooklyn-based Jeremy Pickett of Pickett Furniture (one of our earliest Remodelista advertisers, back in the late aughts) for the minimally detailed cabinets. The countertops are Carrara marble. (For countertop guidance, see our post Remodeling data-src=
Above: We turned to Brooklyn-based Jeremy Pickett of Pickett Furniture (one of our earliest Remodelista advertisers, back in the late aughts) for the minimally detailed cabinets. The countertops are Carrara marble. (For countertop guidance, see our post Remodeling 101: The Difference Between Carrara, Calacatta, and Statuary Marble.) A repurposed florist vase holds stalks of garlic from the farmer’s market (I was inspired by David Tanis’ kitchen storage ideas).
I dithered on the kitchen pendant decision, so as a placeholder, we went with hardware store porcelain fixtures and decorative oversized Nostalgic Collection lightbulbs from Bulbrite, discovered at John Derian’s West Village shop.
Above: I dithered on the kitchen pendant decision, so as a placeholder, we went with hardware store porcelain fixtures and decorative oversized Nostalgic Collection lightbulbs from Bulbrite, discovered at John Derian’s West Village shop.
The wall-mounted Chicago Kitchen Faucet with articulated spout is a model we’ve used before; it’s well priced, American made, and incredibly durable. We installed a dowel in the cabinet above the sink to hold paper towels. (See Aha! Hack: Tension Rod as Paper Towel Holder.)
Above: The wall-mounted Chicago Kitchen Faucet with articulated spout is a model we’ve used before; it’s well priced, American made, and incredibly durable. We installed a dowel in the cabinet above the sink to hold paper towels. (See Aha! Hack: Tension Rod as Paper Towel Holder.)
We tucked a stacked Bosch washer/dryer behind a full-height door; instant laundry room.
Above: We tucked a stacked Bosch washer/dryer behind a full-height door; instant laundry room.
We chose a Bertazzoni PRO304GASX Range for its good looks and relatively slim profile (compared to a Wolf or a Viking).
Above: We chose a Bertazzoni PRO304GASX Range for its good looks and relatively slim profile (compared to a Wolf or a Viking).

Appliances

We scored our SubZero on Craigslist (price: $
Above: We scored our SubZero on Craigslist (price: $2,000). A new Sub-Zero BI-36U 36-Inch Built-In Bottom-Freezer Refrigerator is $10,945. (See 10 Easy Pieces: Best 36-Inch Counter-Depth Refrigerators.)
Our Bertazzoni 30-inch gas range model (pictured) is discontinued; its newer version, the Bertazzoni Professional Series 30 Inch Gas Range with 4 Brass Burners, is $3,67
Above: Our Bertazzoni 30-inch gas range model (pictured) is discontinued; its newer version, the Bertazzoni Professional Series 30 Inch Gas Range with 4 Brass Burners, is $3,672 at AJ Madison.
The Bosch 300 Series Compact Condensation Dryer and Washer are each $data-src=
Above: The Bosch 300 Series Compact Condensation Dryer and Washer are each $1,099. (See 10 Easy Pieces: Stackable Washer/Dryers.)
Our espresso machine is currently out of stock, but you can buy a refurbished Pasquini Livia 90 MN Espresso Machine for $899.
Above: Our espresso machine is currently out of stock, but you can buy a refurbished Pasquini Livia 90 MN Espresso Machine for $899.

Fixtures

The Chicago Faucets Wall-Mounted Adjustable Center Kitchen Faucet has an articulated spout, is well-priced, well-engineered, and offers a classic lab aesthetic; $5.8
Above: The Chicago Faucets Wall-Mounted Adjustable Center Kitchen Faucet has an articulated spout, is well-priced, well-engineered, and offers a classic lab aesthetic; $265.82 at Consumers Plumbing. For more ideas, see 10 Easy Pieces: Wall-Mounted Industrial Faucets.
The Bulbrite Vintage Ceiling Pendant Light Bulb ($35.95 from Nostalgic Bulbs) adds a note of drama.
Above: The Bulbrite Vintage Ceiling Pendant Light Bulb ($35.95 from Nostalgic Bulbs) adds a note of drama.
A Remodelista favorite for its budget price and classic looks, Leviton&#8
Above: A Remodelista favorite for its budget price and classic looks, Leviton’s Porcelain 600-Watt 250-Volt White Outlet Box Lampholder from Home Depot is just $1.92.(See Object Lessons: The Hardware Store Porcelain Light Socket.)

Accessories

Noda Horo&#8
Above: Noda Horo’s White Series Enamel Nestable Meal Prep Baking Trays come in multiple sizes; from $9 at Globalkitchen Japan.
The Riess Enamel Measuring Jug is £ at Manufactum. (See our post on Riess Enamel Accessories at Ancient Industries.)
Above: The Riess Enamel Measuring Jug is £26 at Manufactum. (See our post on Riess Enamel Accessories at Ancient Industries.)
The AGA Hard Anodized Kettle, made in the UK, is £5 at AGA Cookshop. (See  Easy Pieces: Classic Teakettles.)
Above: The AGA Hard Anodized Kettle, made in the UK, is £135 at AGA Cookshop. (See 10 Easy Pieces: Classic Teakettles.)
We use a Ben Wolff flower pot to hold our wooden utensils. This #6 Flower Pot in Light Brown/Beige Clay is nearly 8 inches tall and similar to ours; $6
Above: We use a Ben Wolff flower pot to hold our wooden utensils. This #6 Flower Pot in Light Brown/Beige Clay is nearly 8 inches tall and similar to ours; $62.50.
Borosil&#8
Above: Borosil’s Simple Glass Tumblers start at $32 for a set of 6 at Food52.
The David Mellor Birch Plywood Knife Block is $73 at Heath Ceramics. (See The New British Wave: data-src=
Above: The David Mellor Birch Plywood Knife Block is $73 at Heath Ceramics. (See The New British Wave: 12 Kitchen and Dining Essentials.)
We bought our ceramic canisters from the very first Martha Stewart catalog! These Stoneware Storage Jars from the Freight Store are similar; from £30.
Above: We bought our ceramic canisters from the very first Martha Stewart catalog! These Stoneware Storage Jars from the Freight Store are similar; from £30.
I bought our Frisbee Trash Bin, designed by French industrial designer Frédéric Perigot, at ABC Home (it’s also available from Luminaire); from $3.
Above: I bought our Frisbee Trash Bin, designed by French industrial designer Frédéric Perigot, at ABC Home (it’s also available from Luminaire); from $324.

For a full tour, go to Before/After: A Remodelista Editor’s Refreshed Parlor Floor Flat in Brooklyn Heights, NY.

For more Steal This Look stories, see:



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A Shingled House with Style


On a trip to Paris’s Maison et Objet, our co-founders Julie and Francesca crossed paths with Mona Nerenberg, owner of Bloom in Sag Harbor, NY, a cult-favorite shop filled with Swedish antiques and white ceramics (now in its 18th year). Noting that the Gardenista team had been to her Hamptons home to admire the deer fencing—Mona is married to landscape designer Lisa Bynon—she invited us back to take a proper look inside.

Mona and Lisa live in a 19th-century shingled house that came untouched—and with a falling-down fish market attached to the kitchen. The two met as students at the Parson’s School of Design and have a shared aesthetic that’s all about poetic objects, a black-and-white palette, and not a lot of stuff. Others may have been deterred by the the jungle of vines and colony of bats that had overtaken the residence, but they vowed to keep the gracious center-hall layout as is and approached the remodel as an unveiling .

Their friend interior designer Mark Cunningham, a former VP of creative services at Ralph Lauren, who had joined Mona on early buying trips for Bloom (and with Sam Hamilton co-founded the great SF design emporium March), stepped in to orchestrate. Working in close collaboration, each contributed key elements: Lisa and her crew extended the house’s beadboard paneling in strategic spots, Mona supplied Pierre Jeanneret chairs and apple matting from Bloom, and Mark pulled it all together, new two-story kitchen included. Join us for a tour of a standout Hamptons classic.

Photography by Björn Wallander, courtesy of Mark Cunningham (@marked_ny).

Thanks to a great deal of clearing and planting, the couple and their chickens now live surrounded by three acres of lawn, hedge, and gardens. The shingles and windows are original.
Above: Thanks to a great deal of clearing and planting, the couple and their chickens now live surrounded by three acres of lawn, hedge, and gardens. The shingles and windows are original.

The house is in the hamlet of North Sea—the nearest beach is a quick bike ride away—and was built by a family in the Blue Book of the Hamptons. Mona and Lisa are only the third owners.

Double front doors open to a hall with a new pine floor and a grand stair cloaked in white: the couple used Benjamin Moore&#8
Above: Double front doors open to a hall with a new pine floor and a grand stair cloaked in white: the couple used Benjamin Moore’s Super White throughout (one of our Architects’ Favorite White Paint Picks). Mona and Lisa sold their previous house fully furnished—”we walked out with our cats and our clothes”—so they started from scratch here, and Mark played a big role in the the hunting and gathering.

A Donald Sultan lemon drawing hangs on the wall here over a French bench—ticking stripes are just about the only pattern welcomed in.

The living room is furnished with a trio of upholstered pieces from Ralph Lauren Home that are typically occupied by Charlie and Sam, the cats, and Ruby, the dog. Mark says the stone coffee table from Démiurge is what made the room feel finished.
Above: The living room is furnished with a trio of upholstered pieces from Ralph Lauren Home that are typically occupied by Charlie and Sam, the cats, and Ruby, the dog. Mark says the stone coffee table from Démiurge is what made the room feel finished.

On the walls throughout, Mona and Lisa used Benjamin Moore’s Super White, one of our Architects’ Favorite White Paint Picks.

A bay window overlooks the garden. The Jeanneret teak Chandigarh chair is one of two from Bloom. The rug is Bloom&#8
Above: A bay window overlooks the garden. The Jeanneret teak Chandigarh chair is one of two from Bloom. The rug is Bloom’s signature apple matting, a woven rush so-named, Mona explains, because it was traditionally made in England by apple pickers during the off-season.
The neediest part of the house was the kitchen, part of which had to be ripped off when the crumbling fish market was taken down. Mark came up with the inspired idea of removing the kitchen attic and creating a two-story space. The paint-splattered floor boards were salvaged from the attic, which, for a time, had served as an art studio.
Above: The neediest part of the house was the kitchen, part of which had to be ripped off when the crumbling fish market was taken down. Mark came up with the inspired idea of removing the kitchen attic and creating a two-story space. The paint-splattered floor boards were salvaged from the attic, which, for a time, had served as an art studio.

During the garden off-season, Lisa and her landscape team matched the existing beadboard paneling on the upper walls and ceiling. The room’s centerpiece is an old marble-topped ceramic artist’s table still chalky with clay. Mona tells us “I really don’t like much, in fact I hate just about everything,” but adds she’s ever on the lookout for pieces like the table.

A narrow pantry divides the kitchen from the dining room. A row of butcher&#8
Above: A narrow pantry divides the kitchen from the dining room. A row of butcher’s hooks hang over a watercolor of a rock by Mats Gustafson. The butcher block table is French.
One of the things that Mona least likes is lighting—she says she prefers natural light and notes that she doesn&#8
Above: One of the things that Mona least likes is lighting—she says she prefers natural light and notes that she doesn’t sell any lights at Bloom. In the dining room Mark stepped up to this challenge with a pair of plaster chandeliers by Stephen Antonson—see The Master of Plaster. The antique English cabinet was made for a veterinarian—Mona bought it for her shop but didn’t have room for it. The Swedish stick-back chairs with original paint are also from Bloom.
On a buying trip to the South of France, Mark made the first purchase for the house: this -foot-long dining table. He came up with the inspired idea of hanging Mona and Lisa&#8
Above: On a buying trip to the South of France, Mark made the first purchase for the house: this 14-foot-long dining table. He came up with the inspired idea of hanging Mona and Lisa’s Astier de Villatte plates en masse: a traditional approach “given a fresh face,” he says, “and a great way to bring in another texture and a graphic quality  in lieu of art.” (Lisa did the hanging: “it looks really simple but it wasn’t because each plate is irregularly shaped,” says Mona.)

More Astier de Villatte fills the cabinet: a romantic vine-covered shed in the back of Bloom is devoted solely to the French ceramics.

The library shelves are stacked with Mona&#8
Above: The library shelves are stacked with Mona’s World of Interiors collection dating back to the magazine’s early years in the 1980s. A collapsible wallpaper tables stands by the front windows with a restored and bleached Jeanneret chair in front of it
Ray, from Michael Dweck&#8
Above: Ray, from Michael Dweck‘s Montauk series, hangs in the library. (Dweck is one of a few who Mona represents locally.)
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Above: “I like to be surrounded by space and light,” says Mona of the all-white master bedroom. The cast-iron bed came from a local favorite antiques shop that’s no longer in business. (The vellum box under it holds an extra blanket.) 
An antique chest from Bloom and an armchair from Ralph Lauren Home. The floor is painted in a high-gloss white enamel from Benjamin Moore.
Above: An antique chest from Bloom and an armchair from Ralph Lauren Home. The floor is painted in a high-gloss white enamel from Benjamin Moore.
The bathrooms required redoing, but this one has it original claw-foot tub, which Lisa restored with several coats of black paint. The fixture is from Waterworks. That&#8
Above: The bathrooms required redoing, but this one has it original claw-foot tub, which Lisa restored with several coats of black paint. The fixture is from Waterworks. That’s another Michael Dweck photo hanging on the original paneling.
A guest room, also known as Mark&#8
Above: A guest room, also known as Mark’s room, carries on the black-and-white look to great effect with a boxspring in a ticking from Rogers & Goffigon.

In the years since the house was complete, Mark has opened his own NYC showroom, Marked, and been named to world’s best designer lists: “We were so lucky to have him,” says Mona, “Mark is in another league now.”

A glimpse of the elegant—and deer-proof—fencing that Lisa designed for the vegetable garden. Note the privet, trimmed to the exact middle of the diamond fencing.
Above: A glimpse of the elegant—and deer-proof—fencing that Lisa designed for the vegetable garden. Note the privet, trimmed to the exact middle of the diamond fencing.
See more at The Landscape Designer Is In.
Above: See more at The Landscape Designer Is In.

When we come across a design store we admire, we often ask if we can follow the owner home. Here are three more shopkeepers with inspired homes:



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A Former Religious Retreat Remodeled As A Chic Family Home


Discovered on The Modern House: St. Francis House, a monastic retreat transformed into “an exceptionally chic modern home.” Located in Cambridgeshire, a 45-minute train journey from London, the late-Georgian structure was built as a country estate. It was in the 1950s that a religious order moved in and purpose-rebuilt the place as a silent retreat, stripping out just about all of  the original detailing and introducing, among other things, 22 spartan bedrooms on the second floor.

Ten years ago, when Anna Unwin and Willie McDougall spotted the property in a real estate listing, they were looking to relocate from London with their three daughters. Anna, who runs AU Bespoke, is an interiors stylist and sourcing specialist, and Willie is a developer—talents that enabled them to envision a new life for all 8,500-square feet.

They opened up the downstairs as a series of invitingly tranquil living spaces, and added one of the chicest pale pink kitchens we’ve come across. As for the upstairs monk’s cells, they converted those into five bedroom suites, glam bathrooms included. Their kids are now grown and the couple say they feel ready to roam—they both have business in Ibiza and plan to spend half time there—so their giant remodel is back on the market. Join us for a tour—and go to The Modern House if you’re tempted to move in.

Photography courtesy of The Modern House.

The brick house is set on one-and-a-half acres in the heart of the historic village of Hemingford Grey,  miles northwest of Cambridge. The front garden is shown here, as is a glimpse of the now fully glazed back of the house (the garden room at the far end is the AU Bespoke showroom, open by appointment—Anna formerly had a shop in London&#8
Above: The brick house is set on one-and-a-half acres in the heart of the historic village of Hemingford Grey, 15 miles northwest of Cambridge. The front garden is shown here, as is a glimpse of the now fully glazed back of the house (the garden room at the far end is the AU Bespoke showroom, open by appointment—Anna formerly had a shop in London’s Primrose Hill and now sells haute-vintage design.)
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Above: “It was pretty much a hostel when we got it, so there was a fair amount of structural work to do,” Willie told The Modern House. “We knocked down walls, changed all the windows, and just made it more domestic.” The couple are shown here on the veranda off the main sitting room.

The roof tiles are Welsh slate, one of many details that look as if they’ve always been here but were in fact brought in by Anna and Willie.

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Above: “The remodel took two years–we lived in one side of the house while the other was being finished and vice-versa,” Anna tells us. Among the things that got added: French doors, bespoke interior doors paneled with antiqued mirrors (from Rough Old Glass), and a vast herringbone floor (from reclaimed parquet specialists Eco Flooring UK) salvaged from the M15’s old London headquarters in Thames House on the Strand.
The low-slung sofas are from Caravane.
Above: The low-slung sofas are from Caravane.
The couple imported two th-century stone mantels from France. &#8
Above: The couple imported two 18th-century stone mantels from France. “Seeing trends come and go has made me want to stick with really good-quality materials and timeless forms that hold up over the years,” says Anna.
Anna slipcovered the furniture in vintage Hungarian linen &#8
Above: Anna slipcovered the furniture in vintage Hungarian linen “so everything is washable—important in a busy house with children and dogs.” The hanging lights are Tom Dixon’s Mirror Balls.
The herringbone floor extends into the dining room and adjacent kitchen. Sliding doors provide the glass-topped table with an expansive garden view. The black and white prints were made for Anna by her friend Louisa Grey of House of Grey. (Go to Kitchen of the Week to see Grey&#8
Above: The herringbone floor extends into the dining room and adjacent kitchen. Sliding doors provide the glass-topped table with an expansive garden view. The black and white prints were made for Anna by her friend Louisa Grey of House of Grey. (Go to Kitchen of the Week to see Grey’s kitchen.)
The new kitchen, installed in place of the religious order&#8
Above: The new kitchen, installed in place of the religious order’s canteen, has custom cabinets painted Farrow & Ball Setting Plaster. The brass lights are a vintage Italian design.
The Corian counters have undermount hammered copper sinks from The French House. The range is tucked into a hearth; the backsplash is made of the same Rough Old Glass mirror used on the doors. &#8
Above: The Corian counters have undermount hammered copper sinks from The French House. The range is tucked into a hearth; the backsplash is made of the same Rough Old Glass mirror used on the doors. “It’s easy to clean,” says Anna.

The World War I brass bullet cases on the mantel are from Anna’s AU Bespoke collection.

Opposite a classic china cupboard, the breakfast area veers modern with a Saarinen Table and Panton Chairs. The kitchen walls are painted Farrow & Ball Strong White.
Above: Opposite a classic china cupboard, the breakfast area veers modern with a Saarinen Table and Panton Chairs. The kitchen walls are painted Farrow & Ball Strong White.
The stair with under cupboard is one of the few original details in the house. The couple stripped the rail to reveal the natural wood.
Above: The stair with under cupboard is one of the few original details in the house. The couple stripped the rail to reveal the natural wood.
A linen-upholstered bed and sofa—both from Caravane—in a guest room.
Above: A linen-upholstered bed and sofa—both from Caravane—in a guest room.
Accessories hang from vintage ceramic butcher&#8
Above: Accessories hang from vintage ceramic butcher’s hooks in the guest bath. All of the baths have custom three-part mirrored cabinets.
The master bath is tiled in gray-veined marble that rises to enclose the tub. The trough sink and towel rail are from C.P. Hart.
Above: The master bath is tiled in gray-veined marble that rises to enclose the tub. The trough sink and towel rail are from C.P. Hart.
The estate&#8
Above: The estate’s original chapel remains—the wood floor is original; Anna and Willie had the walls plastered. Willie currently uses the space as a gym, but, says Anna, “we’ve left it as a blank slate for the next owners. A cinema room, a yoga room, a library—it could be so many things.”

Go to The Modern House to see more.

Here are some three more standout house transformations in England:



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An Indoor-Outdoor Kitchen Remodel in Melbourne


When we last checked in on Anna Pipkorn Skermer and Jane Kilpatrick of Pipkorn Kilpatrick, the Melbourne-based interior designers had just tackled their first big commission: an extraordinarily refined houseboat: see Lake Luxe, Scandi-Style.  Today, we’re spotlighting another nature-centric project of theirs: Kilpatrick’s own indoor-outdoor kitchen in a charmingly tiny Edwardian brick row house in Melbourne’s Fitzroy.

To remake the quarters for Kilpatrick and her husband, the duo created a new “flow-through floor plan from front door to backyard,” ending in a clean-lined kitchen that’s fully open to the backyard. The front of the house was largely preserved. What had to be fully reconfigured was an existing north-facing addition out back: a clutch of small spaces ending in an awkward bath/laundry that was the sunniest room in the house. The laundry duo is now tucked out of sight, and a brick terrace and plantings have taken center stage off the large open kitchen. The remodel was completed 10 years ago and recently photographed to prepare the house for sale—Kilpatrick and her husband now have three young sons and need bigger quarters. We think this one looks hard to equal.

Photography courtesy of Pipkorn Kilpatrick.

The center of the house is a bright kitchen and dining area with custom bifold doors and a transom window that fully connects indoors to out. The shotgun hallway was created by flipping the position of the original hall. The charcoal paneled partition hides the fridge and laundry.
Above: The center of the house is a bright kitchen and dining area with custom bifold doors and a transom window that fully connects indoors to out. The shotgun hallway was created by flipping the position of the original hall. The charcoal paneled partition hides the fridge and laundry.

The house dates to the 1890s and brick salvaged from the remodel was reused to pave the new terrace. The plantings include an herbs garden in an old wooden crate.

A polished concrete floor adds to the indoor-outdoor vibe. The kitchen cabinets are a flat-pack design that Kilpatrick and her husband painted and assembled themselves—&#8
Above: A polished concrete floor adds to the indoor-outdoor vibe. The kitchen cabinets are a flat-pack design that Kilpatrick and her husband painted and assembled themselves—”we were on a tight budget”—and had their builder install. They’re finished with Carrara marble counters and Bosch appliances.

The small sink, Kilpatrick says, is scaled to the room: “it’s big enough to wash big pots and deep enough to hide dishes when doing a quick clean.”

Kilpatrick carefully stuck to a palette of whites and grays offset by warm wood tones. A frameless skylight over the kitchen further brightens the space.&#8
Above: Kilpatrick carefully stuck to a palette of whites and grays offset by warm wood tones. A frameless skylight over the kitchen further brightens the space.” Note the pantry/work area tucked off the kitchen—the fridge stands out of view opposite the desk.
The nook is used as a place to study and to charge phones.
Above: The nook is used as a place to study and to charge phones.
The partition is composed of readymade V-groove paneling. (See others example in A DIY Kitchen Overhaul for Under $500 and DIY Beadboard Ceilings, Before and After.)
Above: The partition is composed of readymade V-groove paneling. (See others example in A DIY Kitchen Overhaul for Under $500 and DIY Beadboard Ceilings, Before and After.)
The ash dining table is Hay&#8
Above: The ash dining table is Hay’s Ypperlig design from Ikea surrounded by Thonet’s classic Hoffman Side Chairs. The hanging lights are Nud Classic Black Lamp Holders.
A tall mirror enhances the sense of space and brings the garden into the room. The purple potted plant is a smoke bush.
Above: A tall mirror enhances the sense of space and brings the garden into the room. The purple potted plant is a smoke bush.
The little brick house retains its Edwardian crenellations and other period detailing—and now has a front-door view out to the garden.
Above: The little brick house retains its Edwardian crenellations and other period detailing—and now has a front-door view out to the garden.
The floor plan shows the new kitchen-dining setup and artfully relocated laundry and full bath (which had formerly occupied the back). &#8
Above: The floor plan shows the new kitchen-dining setup and artfully relocated laundry and full bath (which had formerly occupied the back). “We flipped the hall through to the kitchen so you could see the rear garden from the front of the house—and avoid walking diagonally through the living room,” says Kilpatrick.

Craving outdoor access? Here are three more remodels that connect kitchen to garden:



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Steal This Look: A Courageously Colorful Kitchen for a New York Artist


When architect Susan Yun and designer Penelope August paired up to renovate an 1828 Manhattan townhouse for an artist, they weren’t afraid of color. Rather than play it safe with an all-white modern kitchen, Yun and August deployed a palette of purple, marigold, copper, brass, and pink glass. The look, while idiosyncratic, has plenty of genius ideas to replicate. Here’s a list of the details.

Remodeled Townhouse New York Purple and Yellow Kitchen Above: An overall view of the U-shaped kitchen. Photograph by Devon Banks, courtesy of Yun Architecture from Layers of History—and Color—in an Artist Couple’s 1828 Manhattan Townhouse.
Remodeled Townhouse New York Purple and Yellow Kitchen Above: The kitchen has terrazzo counters and a copper sink. Photograph by Devon Banks, courtesy of Yun Architecture from Layers of History—and Color—in an Artist Couple’s 1828 Manhattan Townhouse.

Materials

PPG Porter Paints Artrium White Paint Above: Yun painted the walls with Benjamin Moore’s [product id=”621643″]Atrium White[/product].Farrow & Ball Calluna No 270 Paint Above: The custom kitchen cabinets are painted in Farrow & Ball’s [product id=”1002487″]Calluna[/product].

Recycled Glass Bottle Terrazzo Countertops Above: The countertop, backsplash, and integrated sink are all made with terrazzo cast with recycled glass with colors individually selected by Yun and August. For something similar, Wausau Tile’s Terrazzo Recycled Glass Tile Rio is available at Daltile. You can also source the style from Vetrazzo.

Appliances

Viking 36-Inch Under-Cabinet Range Hood Above: The [product id=”988366″]Viking Professional 5 Series 36-Inch Under Cabinet Range Hood[/product] is similar to the hood within the custom housing in the kitchen. It’s $1,099 for the 36-inch model in stainless at AJ Madison.
Lacanche Vougeot Provence Yellow Range Above: The client’s favorite color is yellow, so she went with a Lacanche Vougeot Modern Range in Provence Yellow. Says August: “I advocated for the marigold yellow enamel over a more lemon yellow” to pair with the dusty pale purple cabinets.
Dualit 2-Slice Countertop Toaster Chrome Above: The [product id=”612551″]Dualit 2-Slice Countertop Toaster[/product] in stainless steel is $259.95 at Williams-Sonoma.

Faucet

Waterworks Easton Vintage Bridge Gooseneck Kitchen Faucet Above: The [product id=”615207″]Waterworks Easton Vintage Bridge Gooseneck Kitchen Faucet[/product] in shiny copper is $2,976.

Lighting

Andrew O. Hughes Meredith Flushmount Glass Light Above: The handblown glass pendant lights were designed by August and made by Andrew O. Hughes in Rosaline colored glass. The [product id=”1008514″]Meredith Flushmount Glass Light[/product] can be ordered directly from August; $990 each.Andrew O. Hughes Meredith Pendant Glass Lights Above: The [product id=”1008510″]Meredith Pendant[/product] is $1,600 from Penelope August.

Accessories

Forbes & Lomax Unlacquered Brass Outlets Above: Unlacquered Brass Electrical Outlets can be found at Forbes & Lomax.

Historic House Parts Set of 5 Antique Bin Pulls Above: Throughout the remodel, August integrated “as many original elements as we could find, including reclaimed floors, old doors, sink, and tubs.” One of which is the opal glass hardware on the kitchen cabinets. You can source something similar by keeping an eye on Historic House Parts (where this Set of [product id=”1008516″]Antique Bin Pulls[/product] came from) and House of Antique Hardware, which stocks [product id=”1008518″]Octagonal Milk White Glass Knobs[/product] for $11.49 each.Historic House Parts Hoosier Offset Cabinet Hinge Polished Copper Above: For similar polished copper kitchen cabinet hinges, consider the [product id=”1008521″]Hoosier Offset Cabinet Hinge[/product] in polished copper for $6.29 each at Historic House Parts.Deborah Ehrlich Maple Cutting Board Above: World’s most elegant cutting board? Deborah Ehrlich’s [product id=”924300″]Maple Cutting Boards[/product] are $125 to $185 each at March.Nambé Gourmet Bulbo Tea Kettle Above: The [product id=”1008523″]Nambé Gourmet Bulbo Tea Kettle[/product] with a wood handle is on sale for $135 at Macy’s.For more colorful kitchens, see our posts:

  • Steal This Look: A Shaker-Style Kitchen in Full Color
  • Steal This Look: A Modern Country Kitchen in Hudson, New York
  • Steal This Look: A Bright Blue, Budget-Forward Kitchen in Brooklyn



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