Kitchen of the Week: A Locavore Chef and Landscape Architect’s Low-Impact Kitchen


For landscape architect Victoria Taylor and chef Jamie Kennedy, a pioneer in Canada’s farm-to-table movement, it was all about the location: “The creek running through the property, the bluff overlooking the village, and a perfect south-facing slope for growing pinot noir,” says Victoria, were what they loved about their farmhouse in Ontario’s Prince Edward County. It certainly wasn’t the 100-year-old structure itself, which, while charming, lacked both heat and running water (hello, outhouse!). Still, they cherished their stays there.

That said, as soon as Vanessa Fong, an architect and Victoria’s cousin’s wife, launched her own business, “we got her on site to start talking!” Their collaboration led to a striking new addition that prioritizes both the couple’s emotional connection to the land and their wish to be as eco-conscious as possible.

“Jamie and Victoria had a strong guiding principle of using as many local materials and suppliers as possible,” says Vanessa. “They found heavy timber from an old barn literally just up the road from their property. (It doesn’t get much more local than that!) We assessed each piece and its usability. With the structural engineer, we then had to figure out where each piece could go and how to work it in with some steel structure to complete the ’skeleton’ of the home.”

It was an involved process, but what they ended up with—a lofty, low-impact kitchen and entertaining space that takes full advantage of the bucolic views—was well worth it. Let’s take a tour.

Photography by Cindy Blazevic, courtesy of VFA.

The large new addition connects to the original smaller farmhouse. &#8
Above: The large new addition connects to the original smaller farmhouse. “We wanted materials that would complement yet have a more contemporary angle,” says Vanessa, “hence, the stained wood siding (harkening back to barn board). The red metal roof is something that the existing farmhouse had and is prevalent in the area.”
The open space in the addition features polished concrete floors, white-washed pine walls, and salvaged timber ceiling beams. The slatted dining chairs by Canadian designer Thomas Lamb were a gift from Victoria&#8
Above: The open space in the addition features polished concrete floors, white-washed pine walls, and salvaged timber ceiling beams. The slatted dining chairs by Canadian designer Thomas Lamb were a gift from Victoria’s parents: “They are such a great design. To stack them away, you unbolt the seat frame and its slides flat,” she says.



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Pink and Green Color Kitchen Remodel in East London


Danish-American couple Catherine and Toke Nygaard moved from California to a Victorian townhouse in East London. Their remodel, by Mike Tuck Studio, includes the ultimate Scandi-meets-Brit kitchen made up of Plain English cabinetry, Dinesen flooring, modern British craft furniture, and an unexpected color palette (pink and green). The look as a whole works so well, it’s infectious: All of us at Remodelista are taking note. Here’s a list of the kitchen’s key elements, right down to every light fixture (there are many) and accessory.

A shot of pink by way of a custom beadboard dining bench and pink Louis Poulsen pendant lights. Photograph by Luke Hayes from Kitchen of the Week: A Greatest-Hits Kitchen for a Danish-American Couple in London.
Above: A shot of pink by way of a custom beadboard dining bench and pink Louis Poulsen pendant lights. Photograph by Luke Hayes from Kitchen of the Week: A Greatest-Hits Kitchen for a Danish-American Couple in London.
The kitchen cabinets and island are from Plain English&#8
Above: The kitchen cabinets and island are from Plain English’s Osea kitchen, done up in a custom shade of olive green (see source below). Photograph by Luke Hayes from Kitchen of the Week: A Greatest-Hits Kitchen for a Danish-American Couple in London.
Can&#8
Above: Can’t go wrong with a Plain English-meets-Gaggenau approach. The cooktop and vent hood shown are both from Gaggenau (see below for the source). Photograph by Luke Hayes from Kitchen of the Week: A Greatest-Hits Kitchen for a Danish-American Couple in London.

Materials

The Plain English Osea kitchen cabinets are painted with Papers & Paints&#8
Above: The Plain English Osea kitchen cabinets are painted with Papers & Paints’ Olive Colour .

The beadboard-back dining bench was custom-made by the couple’s contractor, Lionhead Construction, and painted in Little Greene’s Pink Slip.
Above: The beadboard-back dining bench was custom-made by the couple’s contractor, Lionhead Construction, and painted in Little Greene’s Pink Slip.
Kitchen countertops are Belgian blue limestone. Artistic Tile stocks Belgian Bluestone Honed Limestone Stone Slab and CoorItalia carries Belgian Blue Limestone.
Above: Kitchen countertops are Belgian blue limestone. Artistic Tile stocks Belgian Bluestone Honed Limestone Stone Slab and CoorItalia carries Belgian Blue Limestone.



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Everything You Need to Know About Soapstone Sinks in the Kitchen


How much does a soapstone sink cost?

Standard soapstone sinks can range in price from a few hundred to over $1,000. The standard-size sinks at Vermont Soapstone run from $400 up to $1,000 for a 36-inch two-bowl sink. “Custom sizes will cost more,” says Bowman. “Our 36-inch two-bowl custom sink is in the $1,200 to $1,500 range.”

Soapstone counters and an apron-front sink by Made LLC, a New York–based design-build practice. “We like to use materials that develop character as they’re lived with, becoming increasingly beautiful as they wear in over the years,” says founding partner Ben Bischoff. “Soapstone is one we come back to again and again. It’s beautiful at the start and becomes even more so as it breaks in with your work patterns.” Photograph via Made LLC.
Above: Soapstone counters and an apron-front sink by Made LLC, a New York–based design-build practice. “We like to use materials that develop character as they’re lived with, becoming increasingly beautiful as they wear in over the years,” says founding partner Ben Bischoff. “Soapstone is one we come back to again and again. It’s beautiful at the start and becomes even more so as it breaks in with your work patterns.” Photograph via Made LLC.

How do prices compare with stainless steel or ceramic sinks?

“A good-quality imported stainless steel sink is about the same price,” says Bowman. “And compared to a good porcelain farmhouse sink, soapstone is probably less.”

Does a soapstone sink have to go with a soapstone countertop? 

“We’ll sell you a sink on its own, no problem,” Bowman says with a chuckle. “In fact, we probably sell twice as many sinks as we do countertops, so those sinks get combined with all kinds of different countertop materials, like marble, granite, and the like.” No soapstone counters but still want the sink? Feel free to mix and match.

A seamless draining board, built in. Photograph by Janet Hall.
Above: A seamless draining board, built in. Photograph by Janet Hall.

What special features are available?

Because they’re made of easily-cut stone, soapstone sinks can generally be customized any way you want it. Edges can be square, beveled, or bullnose. Drainage boards can be incorporated. “We can make a three-bowl sink with all the bowls at different heights. We can add a high backsplash so the faucets can be mounted on the back,” he says.

We’ve even built a handful of soapstone bathtubs for around $5,000.” When he spoke with us, Bowman was in Weston, Massachusetts, working in the mudroom of a high-end house to install a custom sink measuring five feet wide and a foot deep—perfect for dog-washing.

More on soapstone:

Finally, get more ideas on how to evaluate and choose your kitchen sink and faucet in our Remodeling 101 Guide: Kitchen Sinks & Faucets.



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Steal This Look: A Luminous Kitchen Renovation in Rockport, Maine


Leave it to design stars Tara Mangini and Percy Bright of Jersey Ice Cream Co. to infuse an undistinguished 2004 builder’s special (see Remade in Maine: Jersey Ice Cream Co. Upgrades a Recently Built House) with rustic charm. The reimagined kitchen has tinted plaster walls, a now-signature Jersey Ice Cream Co. feature, Shaker-style cabinets, a luxury chateau-style range, and luminescent white tile. Here are the elements for re-creating the look.

The kitchen is partially constructed by Jersey Ice Cream Co. and by one of the house&#8
Above: The kitchen is partially constructed by Jersey Ice Cream Co. and by one of the house’s original contractors, Jay Fischer of Cold Mountain Builders. Photograph from Remade in Maine: Jersey Ice Cream Co. Upgrades a Recently Built Rockport House.
A large apron-front farmhouse sink anchors the L-shaped kitchen. It&#8
Above: A large apron-front farmhouse sink anchors the L-shaped kitchen. It’s paired with an unlacquered brass faucet. Photograph from Remade in Maine: Jersey Ice Cream Co. Upgrades a Recently Built Rockport House.
The pièce de résistance: a Lacanche range and white terracotta backsplash. Photograph from Remade in Maine: Jersey Ice Cream Co. Upgrades a Recently Built Rockport House.
Above: The pièce de résistance: a Lacanche range and white terracotta backsplash. Photograph from Remade in Maine: Jersey Ice Cream Co. Upgrades a Recently Built Rockport House.

Materials

Kitchen cabinets, built by Jay Fischer of Cold Mountain Builders, are painted Benjamin Moore Balboa Mist.
Above: Kitchen cabinets, built by Jay Fischer of Cold Mountain Builders, are painted Benjamin Moore Balboa Mist.
The kitchen countertops are honed Crema Delicata Marble, which is available at Stone Source among other stone retailers.
Above: The kitchen countertops are honed Crema Delicata Marble, which is available at Stone Source among other stone retailers.
The kitchen backsplash is made of Clé Tile Zellige Weathered Terracotta Tile left over from the master bath (see the rest of the house in Remade in Maine: Jersey Ice Cream Co. Upgrades a Recently Built Rockport House). The tile has a color &#8
Above: The kitchen backsplash is made of Clé Tile Zellige Weathered Terracotta Tile left over from the master bath (see the rest of the house in Remade in Maine: Jersey Ice Cream Co. Upgrades a Recently Built Rockport House). The tile has a color “made up of, literally, dozens of shades of white” according to Clé is $22.75 per square foot.

Appliances

The range is a French Lacanche Chagny 00 Range in ivory and brass hardware. It can be ordered directly through Lacanche. For more on ranges like this, see  Easy Pieces: Retro Kitchen Ranges.
Above: The range is a French Lacanche Chagny 1400 Range in ivory and brass hardware. It can be ordered directly through Lacanche. For more on ranges like this, see 10 Easy Pieces: Retro Kitchen Ranges.
At the end of the counter is a SubZero -Inch Undercounter Wine Refrigerator. Available at AJ Madison; contact for pricing and more information.
Above: At the end of the counter is a SubZero 24-Inch Undercounter Wine Refrigerator. Available at AJ Madison; contact for pricing and more information.



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Maximum Storage and Workspace in a Streamlined Modern Galley Kitchen


The galley kitchen with its straight-shot layout is derived from nautical design and celebrated for its space efficiencies. Restaurants favor galley setups and so do plenty of serious cooks, especially in urban settings (see our own Julie Carlson’s Brooklyn galley here).

The artist owner of this ground-floor flat in a Georgian townhouse in London’s Islington recruited Jack Trench, who runs an eponymous kitchen and furniture design firm, to come up with a clean-lined galley that looks at home in its historic setting. Maximum storage was also requested, along with plenty of elbow room. Join us for a look at the shipshape results.

Photography courtesy of Jack Trench.

Composed of streamlined cabinets of laminate-clad MDF with oak edging, the kitchen has windows at either end: the French doors open to an eating area and garden. The design is known as the JT Original.
Above: Composed of streamlined cabinets of laminate-clad MDF with oak edging, the kitchen has windows at either end: the French doors open to an eating area and garden. The design is known as the JT Original.

“To respect the building’s original cornicing, we decided to not the run the cabinets right up to the ceiling, so as to give breathing space to the architectural detailing.” explains Jack. He also notes that the counter on the left is a bit shallower than the other to work around an original chimney breast that the client’s architects weren’t permitted to remove. “For a bit of extra space, we inserted a full-length open shelf to keep everyday worktop essentials.”

The counters are Silestone in Gris Expo, as are the backsplashes (with a suede finish). The five-burner cooktop is by Siemens and the under-cabinet extractor is the Weston Cache 700. Note the integrated under-shelf lighting. For tips on recessed lighting, read Expert Advice from Architect Oliver Freundlich.
Above: The counters are Silestone in Gris Expo, as are the backsplashes (with a suede finish). The five-burner cooktop is by Siemens and the under-cabinet extractor is the Weston Cache 700. Note the integrated under-shelf lighting. For tips on recessed lighting, read Expert Advice from Architect Oliver Freundlich.
While the kitchen was being planned, things like juicers and ice cream machines were discussed. &#8
Above: While the kitchen was being planned, things like juicers and ice cream machines were discussed. “Our client wanted lots of cupboard space for both everyday crockery and glassware as well as less frequently used kitchen equipment,” says Jack. “We decided that the upper cabinets on the left-hand galley would be higher up for longer-term storage and also to give enough height from the cooktop to accommodate the built-in extractor.”



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Bright Yellow Kitchens with Painted Kitchen Cabinets


Noticed and admired of late: bright-spot kitchens in shades of turmeric, mustard, and marigold. Here are 10 standouts ranging in style from urban contemporary to vintage beach cottage, all accented in invitingly warm and sunny—and decidedly not mellow—yellows.

Interior designer Lonika Chande painted this new kitchen in multiple coats of Paper & Paint Library&#8
Above: Interior designer Lonika Chande painted this new kitchen in multiple coats of Paper & Paint Library’s “Indian yellow” Muga in a glossy finish. See the project in A London Designer’s Remodel for a Demanding Client (Her Mother). Photograph by Simon Brown.
Master cabinetmakers KBH of Copenhagen outfitted this kitchen in Frederiksberg, Denmark, with a shiny sink and breakfast counter the color of curry. The cabinets are oak; the counter is glazed lava stone. Photograph by Gyrithe Lemche.
Above: Master cabinetmakers KBH of Copenhagen outfitted this kitchen in Frederiksberg, Denmark, with a shiny sink and breakfast counter the color of curry. The cabinets are oak; the counter is glazed lava stone. Photograph by Gyrithe Lemche.
Custom cabinets by Uncommon Projects extend beyond the kitchen in this Victorian terrace house remodel in London designed by MW Architects. Explore the design in Kitchen of the Week: A Boundary-Breaking Remodel in Hampstead Heath. Photograph by Jocelyn Low from Uncommon Projects.
Above: Custom cabinets by Uncommon Projects extend beyond the kitchen in this Victorian terrace house remodel in London designed by MW Architects. Explore the design in Kitchen of the Week: A Boundary-Breaking Remodel in Hampstead Heath. Photograph by Jocelyn Low from Uncommon Projects.
Bright Formica and birch plywood meet geometric tile in a South London design by Koivu, a husband-and-wife-run kitchen company based in Kent, England.
Above: Bright Formica and birch plywood meet geometric tile in a South London design by Koivu, a husband-and-wife-run kitchen company based in Kent, England.
A kindred design, The Scandinavian Kitchen by UK kitchen company Papilio has stainless steel counters: &#8
Above: A kindred design, The Scandinavian Kitchen by UK kitchen company Papilio has stainless steel counters: “Our client wanted a colorful, social space that was also functional for constant use.”
This NYC loft, a collaboration between Architecture Durusoy and construction firm Robertson-Tait, won a Remodelista Considered Design Award in the Best Professional Kitchen category. Read about it in A Sunny Kitchen.
Above: This NYC loft, a collaboration between Architecture Durusoy and construction firm Robertson-Tait, won a Remodelista Considered Design Award in the Best Professional Kitchen category. Read about it in A Sunny Kitchen.
Salvage specialists Retrouvius of London used a natural stone backsplash in this West London kitchen. Go to Masters of Salvage to see another standout remodel of theirs. Photograph by Michael Sinclair.
Above: Salvage specialists Retrouvius of London used a natural stone backsplash in this West London kitchen. Go to Masters of Salvage to see another standout remodel of theirs. Photograph by Michael Sinclair.



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Modern Love: A Contemporary House Updated with Antiques


Having written multiple stories on Colombe Design projects, I’m by now quite familiar with founder Marta Chrapka’s talent for creating new Old World homes that are elegant, luxurious, and traditional-with-a-twist. So I was surprised to learn that this lean, modern house (no graceful moldings or grand foyers in sight) in Podkowa Lesna, a suburb of Warsaw, is also her handiwork.

Upon closer inspection, though, I spied her signature touches—dramatic doors, impactful deployment of color, sculptural lighting, artful antiques, and an emphasis on craftsmanship—throughout the project, albeit tailored this time for a more modern and clean-lined aesthetic.

“Sure, it posed a challenge,” says Marta, about the house’s unadorned bones. “We didn’t have the proportions that I am used to, the nobly aged floor, and all the elements I am usually focused on to reveal their beauty—only the empty spaces. But the real challenge was an attempt to create an interior whose design would bring to mind functionalist/modernist interior but in today’s version.”

It was a challenge that she met with aplomb. Let’s take a tour of this unique house.

Photography by Pion Studio, courtesy of Colombe Design.

A couple, both lawyers, hired Colombe Design to put their stamp on this blank slate of a home. In the modern kitchen, Marta was able to insert some Old World style in the form of hand-painted blue and white porcelain tiles, at right, from Majolika Nieborow, a family-owned business founded in 8data-src=
Above: A couple, both lawyers, hired Colombe Design to put their stamp on this blank slate of a home. In the modern kitchen, Marta was able to insert some Old World style in the form of hand-painted blue and white porcelain tiles, at right, from Majolika Nieborow, a family-owned business founded in 1881.
The kitchen has a sleek and sophisticated look thanks to stained ash cabinets, a black granite countertop, and integrated appliances. The String Cone Pendant Lights are by Michael Anastassiades, from Flos.
Above: The kitchen has a sleek and sophisticated look thanks to stained ash cabinets, a black granite countertop, and integrated appliances. The String Cone Pendant Lights are by Michael Anastassiades, from Flos.
The custom glass and steel door leads to the pantry. &#8
Above: The custom glass and steel door leads to the pantry. “That was the hardest part of the design—a pivot hinge, tall height, and no frame. Nobody wanted to take the risk, but finally we did it,” says Marta.
Inside the pantry, a surprise—a stubbornly old-fashioned larder. &#8
Above: Inside the pantry, a surprise—a stubbornly old-fashioned larder. “It was the owner’s idea—he had an old table that belonged to his grandmother. So we created the space around this table, trying to recreate the atmosphere of 1930,” says Marta. The tiles are custom. “It’s a typical Polish pattern, found in every house in Warsaw. After the war, it was almost forgotten, but we found a guy who knew how to produce it in exactly the same way.”
&#8
Above: “There were many memories built around this table, and the owner did not want to get rid of it,” says Marta.



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Angela Medlin’s Chic Victorian House in Portland, Oregon


“Miss Vicky, as I affectionately named her, is a soulful lady with a little edginess,” says Angela Medlin by way of introduction to her 1906 Victorian cottage in Portland, Oregon’s Sunnyside. Medlin is a fashion designer and self-described “creativepreneur” specializing in sportswear: a series of job overseeing apparel collections for Adidas and Nike’s Jordan Brand are what led her to relocate to Portland, Oregon—three different times. She’s currently staying put, living and working in Miss Vicky.

Medlin bought her house five years ago—”I was  renting a place around the corner and drove by as the broker was staking the For Sale sign in the ground”—and what began as a purely cosmetic remodel ended up, as they so often so, requiring unanticipated structural work. Seven months later, Medlin came away with a new kitchen (and foundation under it) and an entirely different looking house: in place of the “mustard and ketchup” exterior, she introduced a stately, unifying charcoal black.

We discovered Medlin first as fans of House Dogge, her stylish dog toys company, and then via a blog post in Schoolhouse Electric. Intrigued, we came (digitally) knocking and she welcomed us in.

Photography courtesy of Schoolhouse Electric, unless noted.

The exterior is painted in Graphite with Onyx trim, both from Benjamin Moore  (to see the transformative powers of paint, scroll to the end for a Before shot).
Above: The exterior is painted in Graphite with Onyx trim, both from Benjamin Moore  (to see the transformative powers of paint, scroll to the end for a Before shot).

“My friends and family will tell you, they were not convinced by my vision,” Medlin tells us. “Ha ha, Miss Vicky just needed some love. As a non-traditional designer, I followed my instincts and chose color to reimagine the look of this traditional house.”

Medlin and her beloved, late dog Wubbi, an Olde English Bulldogge. Medlin is wearing a sweatshirt of her own design—currently not in production but she makes a Hoody Fleece that&#8
Above: Medlin and her beloved, late dog Wubbi, an Olde English Bulldogge. Medlin is wearing a sweatshirt of her own design—currently not in production but she makes a Hoody Fleece that’s “the equivalent for dogs.”



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Kitchen of the Week: The Curtained Kitchen, Dutch Modern Edition


Curtains aren’t an easy call in the kitchen. True, they’re a quick DIY alternative to cabinet fronts. And they hide your holdings. But a skirted sink runs the risk of looking country kitschy. Not, however, in the hands of Christien Starkenburg.

A Dutch interior designer who wears many hats, Starkenburg has her own firm, Interieur-Plus, as well as furniture workshop, SlowWood. And she’s the creative director and fourth-generation owner (with her brother, Henk) of Jan de Jong, a Scandi-accented interiors emporium in Leeuwarden, capital city of Friesland, that her family opened back in 1899. Thanks to Starkenburg, the business has one of the best-looking kitchens around, and those humble curtains make it especially memorable.

Photography by Anna de Leeuw, courtesy of Jan de Jong Interieur.

The kitchen is located in a section of the Jan de Jong three-story complex that for decades was used as living quarters by various family members. In need of an update, it was stripped down to the beams and reinvented by Starkenburg as Interieur-Plus&#8
Above: The kitchen is located in a section of the Jan de Jong three-story complex that for decades was used as living quarters by various family members. In need of an update, it was stripped down to the beams and reinvented by Starkenburg as Interieur-Plus’s homey workplace, furnished with a mix of her own designs and pieces straight off the Jan de Jong selling floor.
The new open-plan setup revolves around a kitchen with a tight palette of white, charcoal, and pale gray offset by the pale oak of Starkenburg&#8
Above: The new open-plan setup revolves around a kitchen with a tight palette of white, charcoal, and pale gray offset by the pale oak of Starkenburg’s SlowWood designs and the soft curtains. Shown here, SlowWood’s Grut 8 Oval oak table surrounded by Jean Prouvé’s Standard Chairs of plywood and powder-coated steel.
Stained wood cabinetry with cutout drawer pulls is crowned by a concrete counter that was poured on site. The handmade backsplash tiles are by local Friesland tile specialists Albarello. As for the curtains, they&#8
Above: Stained wood cabinetry with cutout drawer pulls is crowned by a concrete counter that was poured on site. The handmade backsplash tiles are by local Friesland tile specialists Albarello. As for the curtains, they’re 100 percent linen and conceal shelves lined with pots and pans. Linen, Starkenburg points out, is “both soft and strong”; woven from flax, it’s biodegradable, naturally wrinkly, and lends, she says, “a sense of life.” (Read more about linen in our Object Lesson.)
 The adjustable sconces are French classics by Lampe Gras.
Above: The adjustable sconces are French classics by Lampe Gras.
The curtains have a simple gathered top and can be easily removed for washing. Like the linen, the mottled concrete balances the otherwise straight-edged lines of the design.
Above: The curtains have a simple gathered top and can be easily removed for washing. Like the linen, the mottled concrete balances the otherwise straight-edged lines of the design.



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Trend Alert: Sculptural Marble Backsplashes


Several months ago, we featured a kitchen sink with a marble backsplash that rises in a curve. This simple flourish—evocative of classic Italian washstands, fountains from antiquity, and boudoir bathrooms—captured our imaginations and sent us looking for more.

It took some searching, but eventually we found a few original thinkers who see backsplashes as practical elements and decorative opportunities. Here, nine standout examples of their work.

Kitchen and Pantry

Colorful small kitchen, London, designed by Beata Heuman. Above: Interior designer Beata Heuman adorned a London mews apartment with a Carrara marble halo. Go to Paddington Pied-à-Terre to see the whole project.
Reath Design Little Holmby house, LA, kitchen. Laure Joliet photo. Above: The backsplash that got us started on this hunt: Frances Merrill of Reath Design designed this bar sink in Namibia White marble for a 1920s Mediterranean-style house: see LA Autumnal, a Makeover Composed in Jewel Tones. The one-handled brass faucet is by Watermark. Photograph by Laure Joliet.
Sussex cottage skirted sink designed by Beata Heuman. Above: In a Sussex cottage, Beata Heuman skirted the utility sink with striped linen and detailed the marble backsplash with a subtle flourish. The seagrass-covered cabinets hold a washer/dryer and cleaning supplies.
Above: Cathy and Garrett Poshusta chronicle their old house renovations in their blog, The Grit and The Polish. Shown here, their own pantry in their Ellensburg, Washington, farmhouse with a backsplash cut, sanded, and honed by Garrett. “He added the concave corners for me,” says Cathy. “I love that it feels both Old World and fresh.” Watch their video of the process here.

Bathroom

Bathroom with marble surround and curved backsplash, designed by Beata Heuman for a Sussex cottage. Above: For this peaked space in Sussex, Beata Heuman applied what she calls an “upstand” of richly veined Arabescato marble to the bath.”Thanks to the height and wooden floor, the room felt like it could take some more stone to add drama and theatricality,” says Heuman.
Il Palazzo Experimental hotel, Venice, Chzon Design. Above: At Il Palazzo Experimental hotel in Venice, a new hotel designed by Remodelista favorite Dorothée Meilichzon of Chzon Design, the mine and yours bathroom mirrors are framed in marble.
Photograph by Karel Balas, courtesy of Henrietta Hotel. Above: More curves in another Chzon design: the Henrietta Hotel—see A London Hotel with a Sense of Joie de Vivre.
Curved marble sink at No.92, Melbourne. Design by Pattern Studio. Photo Traianos Pakioufakis. Above: The restroom at Melbourne restaurant No. 92 features this antique marble basin sourced from Turkey. The team at Pattern Studio designed the space to “evoke a refined rendition of an intimate salon.” Photograph by Traianos Pakioufakis.
Sussex cottage bathroom sink designed by Beata Heuman. Above: In a pink and green bath in the same Sussex cottage, Beata Heuman used acero, a gray limestone finished with a classic washstand backsplash.

More Trend Alerts:

  • Flowers, Fruits, and Plants as Decor
  • Kitchens with Fluted Detailing
  • Piped Pillows of All Hues (Plus 9 to Buy)



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