Modern Thrift: Lucile Demory’s Architect-Designed Rental in Paris


When Lucile Demory moved back to Paris after a stint in Philadelphia, she was lucky enough to find an architect-designed rental loft at the end of a courtyard, in the 10th Arrondissement (a friend’s sister happened to be moving out at the same time). Lucile moved in right away but changed very little. It’s the decor that stands out. Lucile—like her sister, creative director Clarisse Demory—has an offbeat yet refined style that has been developed over decades of thrift store collecting and unaffected by the vagaries of Insta-trends. Join us for a tour.

Photography by Claire Cottrell for Remodelista.

The loft, in a 90s building by commercial architects Fassio-Viaud, once functioned as a counterfeit handbag workshop. Lucile and Michel added floor-to-ceiling curtains and potted plants for privacy.
Above: The loft, in a 1990s building by commercial architects Fassio-Viaud, once functioned as a counterfeit handbag workshop. Lucile and Michel added floor-to-ceiling curtains and potted plants for privacy.
The inset coco mat came with the apartment. Lucile and Michel created an instant entryway with a white-painted peg rail.
Above: The inset coco mat came with the apartment. Lucile and Michel created an instant entryway with a white-painted peg rail.
Lucile couldn’t find a neutral area rug that she liked so, instead, she had a carpet custom cut and added a binding.
Above: Lucile couldn’t find a neutral area rug that she liked so, instead, she had a carpet custom cut and added a binding.
The sofa and ottoman are part of a 60s daybed set by French designer Pierre Chapo. The lamp is a Spirale Desk Lamp by Ingo Maurer for Design M.
Above: The sofa and ottoman are part of a 1960s daybed set by French designer Pierre Chapo. The lamp is a Spirale Desk Lamp by Ingo Maurer for Design M.
Lucile bought the glass coffee table for €5 at a thrift store in Vaulx-Vraucourt, a town in northern France where her mother lives. On the coffee table is a Raku ceramic tile, a found sculpture, and A.P.C. Transmission, the new book by Jean Touitou.
Above: Lucile bought the glass coffee table for €5 at a thrift store in Vaulx-Vraucourt, a town in northern France where her mother lives. On the coffee table is a Raku ceramic tile, a found sculpture, and A.P.C. Transmission, the new book by Jean Touitou.
Lucile on the Pierre Chapo; she wears an A.P.C. Italian lamb&#8
Above: Lucile on the Pierre Chapo; she wears an A.P.C. Italian lamb’s wool sweater. For more on her personal style, visit Unfussy French Girl Style with Lucile Demory.
A 90s halogen floor lamp of Michel’s illuminates a corner; the speakers are from Focal and the turntable is a Technics data-src=
Above: A 1990s halogen floor lamp of Michel’s illuminates a corner; the speakers are from Focal and the turntable is a Technics 1210MK2. Albums are filed in an Ikea Kallax shelving unit, a favorite among record collectors. For more ideas, see 10 Easy Pieces: DJ-Approved Home Stereo Equipment.
The two vintage leather poufs are from a Paris thrift store.
Above: The two vintage leather poufs are from a Paris thrift store.
Two side-by-side pine Ivar Shelving Units from Ikea hold Lucile’s things, from “years of collecting”: glassware from Emmaüs, France’s chain of charity shops, and Philly AIDS Thrift; ceramics by Lucile herself or by friend and artist Cécile Daladier; and a wood-base table lamp from resale site leboncoin.fr.
Above: Two side-by-side pine Ivar Shelving Units from Ikea hold Lucile’s things, from “years of collecting”: glassware from Emmaüs, France’s chain of charity shops, and Philly AIDS Thrift; ceramics by Lucile herself or by friend and artist Cécile Daladier; and a wood-base table lamp from resale site leboncoin.fr.
The white vase with fingerprints is by Lucile.
Above: The white vase with fingerprints is by Lucile.
A sturdy speckled vase brought back from Philadelphia and a stack of ordinary white plates mixed with ceramic dishes.
Above: A sturdy speckled vase brought back from Philadelphia and a stack of ordinary white plates mixed with ceramic dishes.
Glassware in shades of amber, pink, and green.
Above: Glassware in shades of amber, pink, and green.
A fig galette baked by Lucile atop a table of unknown origin that “folds into a mini console.” The silver tray was Michel’s, and Lucile’s sister Clarisse bought the chairs from a Belgian antiques website.
Above: A fig galette baked by Lucile atop a table of unknown origin that “folds into a mini console.” The silver tray was Michel’s, and Lucile’s sister Clarisse bought the chairs from a Belgian antiques website.
A view from the kitchen into the two-tiered living/dining space.
Above: A view from the kitchen into the two-tiered living/dining space.
Lucile and Michel keep the small kitchen spare. On the counter are two stoneware cook pots, bought at a thrift store. The bread on the counter is from Paris bakery Du Pain et Des Idées.
Above: Lucile and Michel keep the small kitchen spare. On the counter are two stoneware cook pots, bought at a thrift store. The bread on the counter is from Paris bakery Du Pain et Des Idées.
A steel handrail is one of the many timeless architectural details added by Fassio-Viaud. Lucile and Michel use one edge of the stairs to store their shoes.
Above: A steel handrail is one of the many timeless architectural details added by Fassio-Viaud. Lucile and Michel use one edge of the stairs to store their shoes.
Lucile and Michel installed the alabaster wall lamp when they moved in. An uncommon color pairing—dark blue and green—is a theme, from throw pillows to candles and vases.
Above: Lucile and Michel installed the alabaster wall lamp when they moved in. An uncommon color pairing—dark blue and green—is a theme, from throw pillows to candles and vases.
A vintage yellow side table fits between the bed and built-in shelves.
Above: A vintage yellow side table fits between the bed and built-in shelves.
Lucile bought the green pillar candle from Vellas Loreto, a church candle shop in Lisbon, Portugal. The blue glass tube vase is, again, from a thrift store, and holds a single stem of pampas grass. The bowl is a half dried calabash (a type of gourd).
Above: Lucile bought the green pillar candle from Vellas Loreto, a church candle shop in Lisbon, Portugal. The blue glass tube vase is, again, from a thrift store, and holds a single stem of pampas grass. The bowl is a half dried calabash (a type of gourd).
Clarisse gave Lucile the school chair, one of a batch she sourced for a restaurant design, and the poster from a 73 Iranian painters exhibition.
Above: Clarisse gave Lucile the school chair, one of a batch she sourced for a restaurant design, and the poster from a 1973 Iranian painters exhibition.
Planted and potted trees create a privacy shield.
Above: Planted and potted trees create a privacy shield.
A view of the gated courtyard shows how the modern Fassio-Viaud structure to the rear contrasts with the traditional, historic Parisian architecture.
Above: A view of the gated courtyard shows how the modern Fassio-Viaud structure to the rear contrasts with the traditional, historic Parisian architecture.

For more on Lucile (and her sister, Clarisse), see our posts:



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A Passive House Design in the Catskills by IdS/R Architecture


Maria Ibañez de Sendadiano and Todd Rouh met at work back when they were both young architects at Smith-Miller + Hawkinson. That was a while ago: the couple have been running their own NYC firm, IdS/R Architecture, since 2000, have two daughters who are now teenagers, and recently found themselves in the happy position of being able to build their own country retreat in New York’s Catskill Mountains.

After years of hiking and camping in the area as a family, they bought a choice piece of land in the township of Mount Tremper surrounded by DEP-owned protected property (it’s on the watershed that supplies NYC’s tap water). This was their first designed-from-the-ground-up house and gave them the opportunity to test ideas—and to get their own hands extremely dirty.

They wanted foremost to build a structure with as little impact as possible, and towards that end decided to follow Passive House standards, a set of stringent rules for creating an ultra-efficient, air-tight dwelling that supplies most of its own energy via solar panels. To save on costs and stay on top of an ambitious construction schedule, the couple also decided to act in tandem as their own general contractor. It took them six months to build the house and another six months to finish the interior. Join us for a visit into the woods.

Photography by Eric Petschek, courtesy of IdS/R Architecture and Vipp.

Modeled after a traditional longhouse layout, the structure has a central living space with bedrooms at either end and multi-purpose loft spaces stacked over them.
Above: Modeled after a traditional longhouse layout, the structure has a central living space with bedrooms at either end and multi-purpose loft spaces stacked over them.

The building is composed of SIPs (prefabricated structural insulated panels), the Passive House building blocks, which Todd notes helped determine the look: “If you using SIPs, then you’re not making a glass house.” The building rests on a steel frame platform raised on piers that, Maria explains, “limited the disruption to the existing site drainage.” Terraced steps lead to the front deck and four sliding glass doors (there are also four doors off the back). The mechanical room is in a concrete cellar and contains, among other things, the ERV system (energy recovery ventilation) crucial to Passive House design. The only trees that had to be taken down made way for the driveway.

The exterior is clad in larch, which was also applied throughout the interior. It has a standing seam metal roof, a favorite of architects (see Hardscaping data-src=
Above: The exterior is clad in larch, which was also applied throughout the interior. It has a standing seam metal roof, a favorite of architects (see Hardscaping 101), and on the nearby septic field there are 24 solar panels that between May and November generate enough power to run everything in the house (“we actually sell power back to the grid,” says Todd).

The aluminum-framed, thermally insulated glass doors are 8 by 8 feet—”the maximum size for a lift and slide door,” says Maria—and, like the triple-glazed windows, were supplied by Schüco. This one, on the north end of the house, opens to the kitchen, outfitted with a freestanding island made by Vipp of Denmark. That’s also the iconic Vipp Pedal Bin in the foreground (we singled it out in Remodelista, A Manual for the Considered Home in our roundup of 100 favorite everyday objects).

Maria and Todd installed all of the interior walls themselves. Their choice of the powder-coated steel island was both aesthetic and practical: &#8
Above: Maria and Todd installed all of the interior walls themselves. Their choice of the powder-coated steel island was both aesthetic and practical: “we love that Vipp’s kitchen designs are modular; this came as a prefabricated unit,” says Todd. (Vipp is a hands-on, family-run company: Sofie Egelund, granddaughter of the inventor of the Vipp bin, runs US operations with her husband,  and came to the site to oversee installation.)
The island is fitted with a sink, dishwasher, and induction cooktop. Additional storage is supplied by a cabinet wall pre-fabricated by Colorado-based CabParts that Marie and Todd painted (Farrow & Ball&#8
Above: The island is fitted with a sink, dishwasher, and induction cooktop. Additional storage is supplied by a cabinet wall pre-fabricated by Colorado-based CabParts that Marie and Todd painted (Farrow & Ball’s Strong White) and installed. In lieu of a range, they opted for a wall oven. The ladder on the wall leads to one of the two lofts at either end of the house.
Todd and Maria designed and built their kitchen table: it&#8
Above: Todd and Maria designed and built their kitchen table: it’s composed of furniture-grade birch plywood bolted to an anodized aluminum base assembled from parts they had in their office. In addition to using their own designs and Vipp’s expanding line (including this gray Wool Rug), the couple gravitated to furniture by Hay: the Danish studio’s Result Chairs are shown here in oak.
The table stands next to a built-in pantry with drawers of unfinished birch ply and white doors. It, too, came from CabParts, &#8
Above: The table stands next to a built-in pantry with drawers of unfinished birch ply and white doors. It, too, came from CabParts, “a good resource for DIYers,” says Todd. “Their cabinets are a bit better quality than Ikea’s, and they offer more custom specifications on sizes—but you need to fill out a very tedious form.”

“The pantry is really the key to our kitchen’s operations,” adds Todd. “It’s the place where all the small appliances and mugs, and things like water bottles go. When the doors are closed, you don’t know it’s there.”

The kitchen is open to the expansive central living room furnished with an L-shaped sectional Mags sofa by Hay and Wool Pillows by Vipp.
Above: The kitchen is open to the expansive central living room furnished with an L-shaped sectional Mags sofa by Hay and Wool Pillows by Vipp.

The passageways lead to a mudroom and small bath on one side and a bedroom on the other, all paneled in larch.

A Rondo stove by Rais supplements sub-floor radiant heating. (The niche is filled with logs from the cleared trees on the property.) &#8
Above: A Rondo stove by Rais supplements sub-floor radiant heating. (The niche is filled with logs from the cleared trees on the property.) “Our goal is to be as close to net zero as possible,” says Todd. “Right now, only our boiler draws power from the electrical grid, and that’s between November and April.”
The house overlooks woodland— the interior and exterior colors were selected to blend with the outdoors. Towards that end, the entire main floor is lined with Summitville quarry tile in rock-like Elephant Gray. &#8
Above: The house overlooks woodland— the interior and exterior colors were selected to blend with the outdoors. Towards that end, the entire main floor is lined with Summitville quarry tile in rock-like Elephant Gray. “Quarry tile is an interior-exterior tile traditionally used in bakeries and commercial spaces; it’s stronger than ceramic and is relatively inexpensive,” says Todd.
Paneled in larch, the bedrooms have a modernist cabin feel. The desk is the Copenhague 90 by Hay and the bedside sconces are Wall Spots by Vipp.
Above: Paneled in larch, the bedrooms have a modernist cabin feel. The desk is the Copenhague 90 by Hay and the bedside sconces are Wall Spots by Vipp.
Accessed by a stair, the loft on the southern end of the house is furnished with daybeds of cabinet-grade birch ply that Maria and Todd designed for the space. They can be moved together to form a larger bed.
Above: Accessed by a stair, the loft on the southern end of the house is furnished with daybeds of cabinet-grade birch ply that Maria and Todd designed for the space. They can be moved together to form a larger bed.
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Above: “Our place was a bit of a research project for us,” says Maria. The couple are currently at work for clients on another energy-efficient house in the area.
The floor plans detail the basement mechanical room, the longhouse layout of the main floor, and the two lofts (the one on the north end has an en suite bath).
Above: The floor plans detail the basement mechanical room, the longhouse layout of the main floor, and the two lofts (the one on the north end has an en suite bath).

Here are three more energy-efficient rural dwellings:



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A Shingled House with Style


On a trip to Paris’s Maison et Objet, our co-founders Julie and Francesca crossed paths with Mona Nerenberg, owner of Bloom in Sag Harbor, NY, a cult-favorite shop filled with Swedish antiques and white ceramics (now in its 18th year). Noting that the Gardenista team had been to her Hamptons home to admire the deer fencing—Mona is married to landscape designer Lisa Bynon—she invited us back to take a proper look inside.

Mona and Lisa live in a 19th-century shingled house that came untouched—and with a falling-down fish market attached to the kitchen. The two met as students at the Parson’s School of Design and have a shared aesthetic that’s all about poetic objects, a black-and-white palette, and not a lot of stuff. Others may have been deterred by the the jungle of vines and colony of bats that had overtaken the residence, but they vowed to keep the gracious center-hall layout as is and approached the remodel as an unveiling .

Their friend interior designer Mark Cunningham, a former VP of creative services at Ralph Lauren, who had joined Mona on early buying trips for Bloom (and with Sam Hamilton co-founded the great SF design emporium March), stepped in to orchestrate. Working in close collaboration, each contributed key elements: Lisa and her crew extended the house’s beadboard paneling in strategic spots, Mona supplied Pierre Jeanneret chairs and apple matting from Bloom, and Mark pulled it all together, new two-story kitchen included. Join us for a tour of a standout Hamptons classic.

Photography by Björn Wallander, courtesy of Mark Cunningham (@marked_ny).

Thanks to a great deal of clearing and planting, the couple and their chickens now live surrounded by three acres of lawn, hedge, and gardens. The shingles and windows are original.
Above: Thanks to a great deal of clearing and planting, the couple and their chickens now live surrounded by three acres of lawn, hedge, and gardens. The shingles and windows are original.

The house is in the hamlet of North Sea—the nearest beach is a quick bike ride away—and was built by a family in the Blue Book of the Hamptons. Mona and Lisa are only the third owners.

Double front doors open to a hall with a new pine floor and a grand stair cloaked in white: the couple used Benjamin Moore&#8
Above: Double front doors open to a hall with a new pine floor and a grand stair cloaked in white: the couple used Benjamin Moore’s Super White throughout (one of our Architects’ Favorite White Paint Picks). Mona and Lisa sold their previous house fully furnished—”we walked out with our cats and our clothes”—so they started from scratch here, and Mark played a big role in the the hunting and gathering.

A Donald Sultan lemon drawing hangs on the wall here over a French bench—ticking stripes are just about the only pattern welcomed in.

The living room is furnished with a trio of upholstered pieces from Ralph Lauren Home that are typically occupied by Charlie and Sam, the cats, and Ruby, the dog. Mark says the stone coffee table from Démiurge is what made the room feel finished.
Above: The living room is furnished with a trio of upholstered pieces from Ralph Lauren Home that are typically occupied by Charlie and Sam, the cats, and Ruby, the dog. Mark says the stone coffee table from Démiurge is what made the room feel finished.

On the walls throughout, Mona and Lisa used Benjamin Moore’s Super White, one of our Architects’ Favorite White Paint Picks.

A bay window overlooks the garden. The Jeanneret teak Chandigarh chair is one of two from Bloom. The rug is Bloom&#8
Above: A bay window overlooks the garden. The Jeanneret teak Chandigarh chair is one of two from Bloom. The rug is Bloom’s signature apple matting, a woven rush so-named, Mona explains, because it was traditionally made in England by apple pickers during the off-season.
The neediest part of the house was the kitchen, part of which had to be ripped off when the crumbling fish market was taken down. Mark came up with the inspired idea of removing the kitchen attic and creating a two-story space. The paint-splattered floor boards were salvaged from the attic, which, for a time, had served as an art studio.
Above: The neediest part of the house was the kitchen, part of which had to be ripped off when the crumbling fish market was taken down. Mark came up with the inspired idea of removing the kitchen attic and creating a two-story space. The paint-splattered floor boards were salvaged from the attic, which, for a time, had served as an art studio.

During the garden off-season, Lisa and her landscape team matched the existing beadboard paneling on the upper walls and ceiling. The room’s centerpiece is an old marble-topped ceramic artist’s table still chalky with clay. Mona tells us “I really don’t like much, in fact I hate just about everything,” but adds she’s ever on the lookout for pieces like the table.

A narrow pantry divides the kitchen from the dining room. A row of butcher&#8
Above: A narrow pantry divides the kitchen from the dining room. A row of butcher’s hooks hang over a watercolor of a rock by Mats Gustafson. The butcher block table is French.
One of the things that Mona least likes is lighting—she says she prefers natural light and notes that she doesn&#8
Above: One of the things that Mona least likes is lighting—she says she prefers natural light and notes that she doesn’t sell any lights at Bloom. In the dining room Mark stepped up to this challenge with a pair of plaster chandeliers by Stephen Antonson—see The Master of Plaster. The antique English cabinet was made for a veterinarian—Mona bought it for her shop but didn’t have room for it. The Swedish stick-back chairs with original paint are also from Bloom.
On a buying trip to the South of France, Mark made the first purchase for the house: this -foot-long dining table. He came up with the inspired idea of hanging Mona and Lisa&#8
Above: On a buying trip to the South of France, Mark made the first purchase for the house: this 14-foot-long dining table. He came up with the inspired idea of hanging Mona and Lisa’s Astier de Villatte plates en masse: a traditional approach “given a fresh face,” he says, “and a great way to bring in another texture and a graphic quality  in lieu of art.” (Lisa did the hanging: “it looks really simple but it wasn’t because each plate is irregularly shaped,” says Mona.)

More Astier de Villatte fills the cabinet: a romantic vine-covered shed in the back of Bloom is devoted solely to the French ceramics.

The library shelves are stacked with Mona&#8
Above: The library shelves are stacked with Mona’s World of Interiors collection dating back to the magazine’s early years in the 1980s. A collapsible wallpaper tables stands by the front windows with a restored and bleached Jeanneret chair in front of it
Ray, from Michael Dweck&#8
Above: Ray, from Michael Dweck‘s Montauk series, hangs in the library. (Dweck is one of a few who Mona represents locally.)
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Above: “I like to be surrounded by space and light,” says Mona of the all-white master bedroom. The cast-iron bed came from a local favorite antiques shop that’s no longer in business. (The vellum box under it holds an extra blanket.) 
An antique chest from Bloom and an armchair from Ralph Lauren Home. The floor is painted in a high-gloss white enamel from Benjamin Moore.
Above: An antique chest from Bloom and an armchair from Ralph Lauren Home. The floor is painted in a high-gloss white enamel from Benjamin Moore.
The bathrooms required redoing, but this one has it original claw-foot tub, which Lisa restored with several coats of black paint. The fixture is from Waterworks. That&#8
Above: The bathrooms required redoing, but this one has it original claw-foot tub, which Lisa restored with several coats of black paint. The fixture is from Waterworks. That’s another Michael Dweck photo hanging on the original paneling.
A guest room, also known as Mark&#8
Above: A guest room, also known as Mark’s room, carries on the black-and-white look to great effect with a boxspring in a ticking from Rogers & Goffigon.

In the years since the house was complete, Mark has opened his own NYC showroom, Marked, and been named to world’s best designer lists: “We were so lucky to have him,” says Mona, “Mark is in another league now.”

A glimpse of the elegant—and deer-proof—fencing that Lisa designed for the vegetable garden. Note the privet, trimmed to the exact middle of the diamond fencing.
Above: A glimpse of the elegant—and deer-proof—fencing that Lisa designed for the vegetable garden. Note the privet, trimmed to the exact middle of the diamond fencing.
See more at The Landscape Designer Is In.
Above: See more at The Landscape Designer Is In.

When we come across a design store we admire, we often ask if we can follow the owner home. Here are three more shopkeepers with inspired homes:



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A Former Religious Retreat Remodeled As A Chic Family Home


Discovered on The Modern House: St. Francis House, a monastic retreat transformed into “an exceptionally chic modern home.” Located in Cambridgeshire, a 45-minute train journey from London, the late-Georgian structure was built as a country estate. It was in the 1950s that a religious order moved in and purpose-rebuilt the place as a silent retreat, stripping out just about all of  the original detailing and introducing, among other things, 22 spartan bedrooms on the second floor.

Ten years ago, when Anna Unwin and Willie McDougall spotted the property in a real estate listing, they were looking to relocate from London with their three daughters. Anna, who runs AU Bespoke, is an interiors stylist and sourcing specialist, and Willie is a developer—talents that enabled them to envision a new life for all 8,500-square feet.

They opened up the downstairs as a series of invitingly tranquil living spaces, and added one of the chicest pale pink kitchens we’ve come across. As for the upstairs monk’s cells, they converted those into five bedroom suites, glam bathrooms included. Their kids are now grown and the couple say they feel ready to roam—they both have business in Ibiza and plan to spend half time there—so their giant remodel is back on the market. Join us for a tour—and go to The Modern House if you’re tempted to move in.

Photography courtesy of The Modern House.

The brick house is set on one-and-a-half acres in the heart of the historic village of Hemingford Grey,  miles northwest of Cambridge. The front garden is shown here, as is a glimpse of the now fully glazed back of the house (the garden room at the far end is the AU Bespoke showroom, open by appointment—Anna formerly had a shop in London&#8
Above: The brick house is set on one-and-a-half acres in the heart of the historic village of Hemingford Grey, 15 miles northwest of Cambridge. The front garden is shown here, as is a glimpse of the now fully glazed back of the house (the garden room at the far end is the AU Bespoke showroom, open by appointment—Anna formerly had a shop in London’s Primrose Hill and now sells haute-vintage design.)
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Above: “It was pretty much a hostel when we got it, so there was a fair amount of structural work to do,” Willie told The Modern House. “We knocked down walls, changed all the windows, and just made it more domestic.” The couple are shown here on the veranda off the main sitting room.

The roof tiles are Welsh slate, one of many details that look as if they’ve always been here but were in fact brought in by Anna and Willie.

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Above: “The remodel took two years–we lived in one side of the house while the other was being finished and vice-versa,” Anna tells us. Among the things that got added: French doors, bespoke interior doors paneled with antiqued mirrors (from Rough Old Glass), and a vast herringbone floor (from reclaimed parquet specialists Eco Flooring UK) salvaged from the M15’s old London headquarters in Thames House on the Strand.
The low-slung sofas are from Caravane.
Above: The low-slung sofas are from Caravane.
The couple imported two th-century stone mantels from France. &#8
Above: The couple imported two 18th-century stone mantels from France. “Seeing trends come and go has made me want to stick with really good-quality materials and timeless forms that hold up over the years,” says Anna.
Anna slipcovered the furniture in vintage Hungarian linen &#8
Above: Anna slipcovered the furniture in vintage Hungarian linen “so everything is washable—important in a busy house with children and dogs.” The hanging lights are Tom Dixon’s Mirror Balls.
The herringbone floor extends into the dining room and adjacent kitchen. Sliding doors provide the glass-topped table with an expansive garden view. The black and white prints were made for Anna by her friend Louisa Grey of House of Grey. (Go to Kitchen of the Week to see Grey&#8
Above: The herringbone floor extends into the dining room and adjacent kitchen. Sliding doors provide the glass-topped table with an expansive garden view. The black and white prints were made for Anna by her friend Louisa Grey of House of Grey. (Go to Kitchen of the Week to see Grey’s kitchen.)
The new kitchen, installed in place of the religious order&#8
Above: The new kitchen, installed in place of the religious order’s canteen, has custom cabinets painted Farrow & Ball Setting Plaster. The brass lights are a vintage Italian design.
The Corian counters have undermount hammered copper sinks from The French House. The range is tucked into a hearth; the backsplash is made of the same Rough Old Glass mirror used on the doors. &#8
Above: The Corian counters have undermount hammered copper sinks from The French House. The range is tucked into a hearth; the backsplash is made of the same Rough Old Glass mirror used on the doors. “It’s easy to clean,” says Anna.

The World War I brass bullet cases on the mantel are from Anna’s AU Bespoke collection.

Opposite a classic china cupboard, the breakfast area veers modern with a Saarinen Table and Panton Chairs. The kitchen walls are painted Farrow & Ball Strong White.
Above: Opposite a classic china cupboard, the breakfast area veers modern with a Saarinen Table and Panton Chairs. The kitchen walls are painted Farrow & Ball Strong White.
The stair with under cupboard is one of the few original details in the house. The couple stripped the rail to reveal the natural wood.
Above: The stair with under cupboard is one of the few original details in the house. The couple stripped the rail to reveal the natural wood.
A linen-upholstered bed and sofa—both from Caravane—in a guest room.
Above: A linen-upholstered bed and sofa—both from Caravane—in a guest room.
Accessories hang from vintage ceramic butcher&#8
Above: Accessories hang from vintage ceramic butcher’s hooks in the guest bath. All of the baths have custom three-part mirrored cabinets.
The master bath is tiled in gray-veined marble that rises to enclose the tub. The trough sink and towel rail are from C.P. Hart.
Above: The master bath is tiled in gray-veined marble that rises to enclose the tub. The trough sink and towel rail are from C.P. Hart.
The estate&#8
Above: The estate’s original chapel remains—the wood floor is original; Anna and Willie had the walls plastered. Willie currently uses the space as a gym, but, says Anna, “we’ve left it as a blank slate for the next owners. A cinema room, a yoga room, a library—it could be so many things.”

Go to The Modern House to see more.

Here are some three more standout house transformations in England:



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The All-Vintage Renovation by Quintana Partners in Menorca, Spain


We recently discovered the work of Menorca, Spain–based Quintana Partners (thanks, Megan, for clueing us in) and have been poring over their portfolio ever since. The firm was founded by Escat Benito Diaz, a watchmaker turned interior designer who honed his skills restoring houses in Frankfurt, Miami, and Venezuela before moving to the island of Menorca. Diaz recruited two compatriots, Benito Escat Velez and Pol Castells Segarra, to join him, and now the three designers work together creating some of the most charmingly eccentric and innovative interiors we’ve seen in a while.

Case in point: the firm’s Sa Calma project, a reimagined 150-year-old townhouse in the center of Mahon, artfully outfitted with flea market finds.

For more, visit Quintana Partners.

Sa Calma Project in Menorca by Quintana Partners

Above: The ground-floor entry, with original stone floors and tiled walls. The firm’s distinct design vocabulary draws on the island’s architecture, a blend of midcentury Spanish and British colonial.

Sa Calma Project in Menorca by Quintana Partners

Above: The tiles, from the early 20th century, are original to the house. The military uniforms are British, found in an antique shop in Menorca, and framed in double glass.

Sa Calma Project in Menorca by Quintana Partners

Above: To unearth the original walls, the designers removed the painted frescos of past renovations.

Sa Calma Project in Menorca by Quintana Partners

Above: The living room has the original tiled floors, fireplace, and refinished wood paneling.

Sa Calma Project in Menorca by Quintana Partners

Above: Cast concrete wash basins, a design most often found in laundry rooms, function as the kitchen sink with a wall-mounted dish rack overhead. The kitchen is equipped with a blue Smeg 50s-Style Refrigerator, Smeg 30-Inch Freestanding Gas Range, Smeg Victoria Ventilation Hood, and a dishwasher from Spanish company Corberó.

Sa Calma Project in Menorca by Quintana Partners

Above: “The kitchen was divided into three rooms with Formica elements,” says Segarra. “With the client, we decided to take the walls down and create one giant space.” They found a handmade wood and marble countertop and repurposed a traditional Menorcan clothes rail as a pot rack.

Sa Calma Project in Menorca by Quintana Partners

Above: A door with an original stained glass arch leads to a narrow patio and steps to the outdoor space.

Sa Calma Project in Menorca by Quintana Partners

Above: Tableware is stored in an antique pine cabinet behind a stack of red wooden folding chairs. (For something similar, consider Fermob’s Bistro Folding Chair in Poppy Red; $216 at YLiving.)

Sa Calma Project in Menorca by Quintana Partners

Above: Beveled subway tiles line the wall of one of four bathrooms in the townhouse.

Sa Calma Project in Menorca by Quintana Partners

Above: All baths in the house were retrofitted with vintage fixtures from Menorca, Barcelona, and Paris—except for the toilets and bidets, which are all by Roca.

manourca-bath-remodelista-10

Above: Details of the vintage bath fixtures.

Sa Calma Project in Menorca by Quintana Partners

Above: The designers restored the bedroom’s original tiled floor. The walls are built of Marés stone, and the gold pendant lamp is by Jaime Hayón for Metalarte.

Sa Calma Project in Menorca by Quintana Partners

Above: A vintage iron tub sourced from an antique shop in Barcelona and kitted out with a retro-style tub-filler faucet.

Sa Calma Project in Menorca by Quintana Partners

Above: Another bedroom with original tiled floors, an antique painted armoire, and a pair of midcentury table lamps.

Sa Calma Project in Menorca by Quintana Partners

Above: The designers created a custom bathtub base made of Marés, a water-resistant stone used in the construction of many Menorcan houses. When they stripped the surfaces of the existing wallpaper, they “found little rectangles of wood set into the walls, so we added a coat of varnish to seal the walls from humidity while preserving the original detailing,” says Segarra.

Sa Calma Project in Menorca by Quintana Partners

Above: The central staircase in the townhouse with the original iron rail.

For more designs in Spain, see our posts:

  • Herbal Essence: A Modern Apothecary in Valencia, Spain
  • An Architect’s Indoor/Outdoor in Mallorca, Spain



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