The New Unsuburban Kitchen Booth, 10 Favorites


Recently, we identified the kitchen booth as a trend to watch. Defined as an L- or U-shaped banquette or two facing benches (think 1950s diner), the new kitchen booth is on the rise. Here are our current favorites.

An L-shaped booth in oil-finished white oak by designers Space Exploration from Kitchen of the Week: An Ikea Kitchen with an Elegant Upper Cabinet Solution.
Above: An L-shaped booth in oil-finished white oak by designers Space Exploration from Kitchen of the Week: An Ikea Kitchen with an Elegant Upper Cabinet Solution.
A corner booth is created from a built-in bench and partial glass wall by architectural designers Studio Oink in a Washington, DC, remodel. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Remodelista; styling by Alexa Hotz from A Luminous, Euro-Style Row House in Washington, DC, Courtesy of Studio Oink.
Above: A corner booth is created from a built-in bench and partial glass wall by architectural designers Studio Oink in a Washington, DC, remodel. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Remodelista; styling by Alexa Hotz from A Luminous, Euro-Style Row House in Washington, DC, Courtesy of Studio Oink.
A booth created in a kitchen dining nook by Tamar Barnoon. Photograph by Laure Joliet from Kitchen of the Week: In Los Feliz, A Moody, Romantic Spanish Modern Update.
Above: A booth created in a kitchen dining nook by Tamar Barnoon. Photograph by Laure Joliet from Kitchen of the Week: In Los Feliz, A Moody, Romantic Spanish Modern Update.
A Copenhagen kitchen features Dinesen Heart Oak furniture (and floors) for a built-in booth. See more of the kitchen in Remodeling data-src=
Above: A Copenhagen kitchen features Dinesen Heart Oak furniture (and floors) for a built-in booth. See more of the kitchen in Remodeling 101: The L-Shaped Kitchen.
Designed by architect Thomas Kroeger of TKA, the Hofhaus Kitchen in Düsseldorf, Germany, features a mustard yellow built-in booth.
Above: Designed by architect Thomas Kroeger of TKA, the Hofhaus Kitchen in Düsseldorf, Germany, features a mustard yellow built-in booth.
Designed after the wood booths at restaurant Chez Panisse, Jim Rosenfield created a booth from untreated strips of fir at the Marin Country Mart Office. Photograph by Mimi Giboin for Remodelista from Marin’s Most Beautiful Office Space?.
Above: Designed after the wood booths at restaurant Chez Panisse, Jim Rosenfield created a booth from untreated strips of fir at the Marin Country Mart Office. Photograph by Mimi Giboin for Remodelista from Marin’s Most Beautiful Office Space?.
Designer Kara Rosenlund created a built-in U-shaped booth at the end of her kitchen. See more in Kitchen of the Week: A Blank-Slate Queensland Cottage Kitchen for a Stylist.
Above: Designer Kara Rosenlund created a built-in U-shaped booth at the end of her kitchen. See more in Kitchen of the Week: A Blank-Slate Queensland Cottage Kitchen for a Stylist.
A custom-built cherry booth in the Oakland, California, house of photographer Aya Brackett from Kitchen of the Week: Aya Brackett’s Hippie House Update in Oakland.
Above: A custom-built cherry booth in the Oakland, California, house of photographer Aya Brackett from Kitchen of the Week: Aya Brackett’s Hippie House Update in Oakland.
A booth-style seating area designed from antique church pews in the British Standard-designed kitchen from Kitchen of the Week: A Brightly Colored (and Cost Conscious) London Kitchen.
Above: A booth-style seating area designed from antique church pews in the British Standard-designed kitchen from Kitchen of the Week: A Brightly Colored (and Cost Conscious) London Kitchen.

For more kitchen design trends, see our posts:



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11 Zero-Cost Room-Changing Ideas – Remodelista


Renovating your home can be a time-consuming and expensive process (I should know; I’ve been slowly working on my 1880s house outside Boston for years now).

But you’d be surprised by how easy it is to refresh a room with just a few simple tweaks. I was reminded of this fact a few weeks ago when I volunteered to help a friend get her house ready for a party. Ostensibly, I was on hand to make the flower arrangements, but I couldn’t resist the urge to move a few things here and there. Before I knew it, we had completely transformed the look of the place, all within a couple of hours and without buying anything new.

None of the things I did would qualify as groundbreaking design, but what a difference it made. Sometimes even the simplest design tenets bear repeating.

1. Rehang your art.

At Harbor Cottage in Maine, a silkscreen print by British artist Wilhelmina Barns-Graham hovers above the objects on the cabinet so that it feels like part of a larger composition. Photograph by Justine Hand.
Above: At Harbor Cottage in Maine, a silkscreen print by British artist Wilhelmina Barns-Graham hovers above the objects on the cabinet so that it feels like part of a larger composition. Photograph by Justine Hand.

One of the most common design mistakes I see is art that is hung too high. Rule number one with art, it should “relate” to the object(s) around it. I subscribe to the idea that, generally, pictures should be at eye level; you should never have to look up to view art (unless it’s hung over a tall object). My aunt Sheila, an architect, uses her windows as a guide, hanging art so the middle of the pictures hangs in line with or only slightly above the center of the windows.

Since eye levels and window heights vary, another good principle is that art should be viewed as part of a larger composition. For example: If you are hanging a single piece over a desk, it should be hover over the desk, creating a dialogue between the two pieces. If you are positioning a piece over the couch and next to a tall floor lamp, it should rest in relation to both so that it balances out the composition of the three objects.

Another picture principle: Have you ever noticed that the catchiest tunes have recognizable patterns along with periods of rest and syncopation? The same maxim applies to good design. So instead of hanging a single work of art on each wall, compose a dramatic crescendo by grouping several pieces on one wall, while at the same time creating periods of rest by leaving other walls blank.

2. Give your furniture room to breathe.

Even in a huge space like this hotel loft by Lost & Found, you can create an intimate grouping by positioning seating and side tables close together.
Above: Even in a huge space like this hotel loft by Lost & Found, you can create an intimate grouping by positioning seating and side tables close together.

As with pictures, with furniture the goal is to craft harmonious relationships within a space. Create more of a conscious grouping by pulling furniture away from walls and out of corners. You will notice a greater sense of intimacy within the space, as well as an airier quality.

3. Apply circular thinking.

An intimate grouping of furniture, plants, and lighting at the Artilleriet apartment in Sweden has a dynamic circular flow. Photograph by Johanna Bradford, courtesy of Artilleriet.
Above: An intimate grouping of furniture, plants, and lighting at the Artilleriet apartment in Sweden has a dynamic circular flow. Photograph by Johanna Bradford, courtesy of Artilleriet.

As a former dancer, I believe that all movement, or at least the energy created by motion, occurs within a series of circles, not as straight lines (kind of like the image of Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man). The same can be said with design. When arranging your furniture, you can create a similar circular dynamic, not by literally placing pieces in a real orb, but by imagining that each is held in place by a kind a centrifugal force. (Note that this concept also works on the horizontal plane. Can you see how the objects in the picture below create a cyclical effect?)

4. Create visual transitions.

In Michael Verheyden&#8
Above: In Michael Verheyden’s house in Belgium, “transitional” pieces create a virtual cascade of objects, easing the eye from ceiling to floor. Photograph courtesy of Dwell Magazine.



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Bright Yellow Kitchens with Painted Kitchen Cabinets


Noticed and admired of late: bright-spot kitchens in shades of turmeric, mustard, and marigold. Here are 10 standouts ranging in style from urban contemporary to vintage beach cottage, all accented in invitingly warm and sunny—and decidedly not mellow—yellows.

Interior designer Lonika Chande painted this new kitchen in multiple coats of Paper & Paint Library&#8
Above: Interior designer Lonika Chande painted this new kitchen in multiple coats of Paper & Paint Library’s “Indian yellow” Muga in a glossy finish. See the project in A London Designer’s Remodel for a Demanding Client (Her Mother). Photograph by Simon Brown.
Master cabinetmakers KBH of Copenhagen outfitted this kitchen in Frederiksberg, Denmark, with a shiny sink and breakfast counter the color of curry. The cabinets are oak; the counter is glazed lava stone. Photograph by Gyrithe Lemche.
Above: Master cabinetmakers KBH of Copenhagen outfitted this kitchen in Frederiksberg, Denmark, with a shiny sink and breakfast counter the color of curry. The cabinets are oak; the counter is glazed lava stone. Photograph by Gyrithe Lemche.
Custom cabinets by Uncommon Projects extend beyond the kitchen in this Victorian terrace house remodel in London designed by MW Architects. Explore the design in Kitchen of the Week: A Boundary-Breaking Remodel in Hampstead Heath. Photograph by Jocelyn Low from Uncommon Projects.
Above: Custom cabinets by Uncommon Projects extend beyond the kitchen in this Victorian terrace house remodel in London designed by MW Architects. Explore the design in Kitchen of the Week: A Boundary-Breaking Remodel in Hampstead Heath. Photograph by Jocelyn Low from Uncommon Projects.
Bright Formica and birch plywood meet geometric tile in a South London design by Koivu, a husband-and-wife-run kitchen company based in Kent, England.
Above: Bright Formica and birch plywood meet geometric tile in a South London design by Koivu, a husband-and-wife-run kitchen company based in Kent, England.
A kindred design, The Scandinavian Kitchen by UK kitchen company Papilio has stainless steel counters: &#8
Above: A kindred design, The Scandinavian Kitchen by UK kitchen company Papilio has stainless steel counters: “Our client wanted a colorful, social space that was also functional for constant use.”
This NYC loft, a collaboration between Architecture Durusoy and construction firm Robertson-Tait, won a Remodelista Considered Design Award in the Best Professional Kitchen category. Read about it in A Sunny Kitchen.
Above: This NYC loft, a collaboration between Architecture Durusoy and construction firm Robertson-Tait, won a Remodelista Considered Design Award in the Best Professional Kitchen category. Read about it in A Sunny Kitchen.
Salvage specialists Retrouvius of London used a natural stone backsplash in this West London kitchen. Go to Masters of Salvage to see another standout remodel of theirs. Photograph by Michael Sinclair.
Above: Salvage specialists Retrouvius of London used a natural stone backsplash in this West London kitchen. Go to Masters of Salvage to see another standout remodel of theirs. Photograph by Michael Sinclair.



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Trend Alert: Piped Pillows of All Hues (Plus Nine to Buy)


Noticed the past few weeks: throw pillows with pretty, prominent piping, both two-tone and monochrome. From Zara Home to CB2, every design shop and retailer out there seems to have its own version; then I spotted on Instagram that Remodelista fave Evangeline Linens debuted their new collection at NY Now this week. Among the new wares? Velvet pillows with contrasting piping.

Here are a handful of piped pillows I’ve been admiring, eager to add to my couch, and bed, and armchair…

Velvet Throw Pillow from Zara Home Above: Zara Home’s Velvet Throw Pillow comes in two mirror colorways: cream with camel piping and camel with cream piping; both are $29.90.
Blu Dot Duck Duck Wool Feathers Throw Pillow from Perigold Above: A favorite by Blu Dot: The Duck Duck Wool Feathers Throw Pillow is available in a multitude of three-tone color ways (in addition to having contrasting piping, the two sides are also different colors). This one is light grey with “tomato” piping (and a surprise blue on the back); $119 from Perigold.
Anthropologie Adelina Slub Velvet Pillow Above: The Adelina Slub Velvet Pillow from Anthropologie comes in a variety of velvet hues, many—like silver with plum, emerald with lime, pink with ochre, and the two-tone blue shown here—with contrasting piping. They’re $48 for the 18 by 18 size.
H&M Cotton Velvet Cushion Cover Above: I recently purchased a dusty rouge-colored velvet cushion cover with black piping from H&M Home; that color is sadly sold out, but I’ve also been eyeing the same Cotton Velvet Cushion Cover in white and black; $17.99.
ABC Carpet & Home Maison de Vacances Royal Velvet Pillow in Clay Above: The Maison de Vacances Royal Velvet Pillow in Clay is made in France and features dark rust piping (and a metallic zipper pull); $195 from ABC Carpet & Home
Copper Crushed Velvet Pillow from CB2 Above: CB2’s Crushed Velvet Pillow, shown here in copper, comes also in navy and emerald, all with black piping and cotton backs. Each is $39.95.

Above: Two-tone Linen Throw Pillows from Zara Home in soft blue and sage green; $35.90 each.

Blu Dot Duck Duck Wool Feathers Throw Pillow from Perigold Above: And another of Blu Dot’s colorways I love: the Duck Duck Wool Feathers Throw Pillow in olive and peach; $119 from Perigold.

And, stay tuned for Evangeline Linens’ new velvet pillows, including one with the promising description “Thunder Cloud with Gold Lichen Piping.”

More in the way of pillows and throws:

  • High/Low: Jewel-Toned Velvet/Linen Pillows
  • 10 Easy Pieces: Round Velvet Cushions
  • Colorful Pillows Inspired by Portuguese Tiles from Lusitano Studio



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A Raw Review of 2020’s New American Home


Getty Images; realtor.com

“House Party” is realtor.com®’s official podcast about the overlapping worlds of real estate and pop culture, hosted by Natalie WayErik Gunther, and Rachel Stults. Click the player above to hear our takes on this week’s hot topics.

If you’re a loyal “House Party” listener, you know there are few things we enjoy more than ogling the latest luxurious and outrageous homes that pop up on the market. So imagine our excitement when we got to actually go inside one—and compile a report for you straight from the scene.

That’s what happened when Rachel toured the 2020 New American Home last week during the seventh annual Design and Construction Week in Las Vegas. The 7,638-square-foot home in Henderson, NV, was built to showcase the latest innovations in design, efficiency, and technology—plus every luxury amenity you could imagine. Impressive? Sure. But we have some (possibly) controversial takes on a few of the design choices inside—and outside—this place.

Other topics we cover:

  • A review of several new home products presented at the show in Las Vegas (Warning: You might be tempted to crack open an adult beverage while listening.)
  • The Baltimore foreclosure that is easily the most bizarre listing we’ve seen in 2020 thus far
  • The home remodeling projects that pay off the most—and the one that really, really doesn’t
  • And, of course, our celebrity real estate winner and loser (Our loser had to shred the price on his gorgeous Malibu, CA, home, while our winner scored a breathtaking retreat that just might make him feel like the last man on Earth.)

Ready to listen? Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. And please: Throw us a five-star rating if you like what you hear. The more good ratings and reviews we have, the easier it’ll be for people to find us.

Want to chime in? Have your own crazy home-related story you’re dying to share? We’re all ears, eagerly waiting to discuss all of your burning real estate questions. Email us at podcast@realtor.com, follow us on Facebook, or tweet us @housepartypod on Twitter.

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Stories we discussed on ‘House Party’ this week:

The 2020 New American Home Wowed Us—Except for These 3 Things

Exclusive: TV’s Nate Berkus on 2020’s Top Design Trends and the Biggest Mistake People Make

Bizarre Baltimore Foreclosure Features Weird Indoor Pool for Only $140K

2020’s Smartest (and Dumbest) Remodeling Projects: What Pays Off vs. What You’ll Regret

Olympian Shaun White Cuts Price on Gorgeous Craftsman in Malibu

Comedian Will Forte Scores Glorious $6.25M Home on the Carmel Coast



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Is Dr. Phil’s Mansion the Stuff of Nightmares?


House Party Podcast

Getty Images; realtor.com

“House Party” is realtor.com®’s official podcast about the overlapping worlds of real estate and pop culture, hosted by Natalie WayErik Gunther, and Rachel Stults. Click the player above to hear our takes on this week’s hot topics.

“The idea is kind of Tim Burton threw up on a canvas, and it turned into a house.”

Believe it or not, that’s the concept behind the Beverly Hills, CA, mansion owned by TV personality Dr. Phil and occupied by his son Jordan McGraw. The internet went bonkers when the five-bedroom, 6,170-square-foot estate bounced onto the market on the final day of 2019, featuring some interesting decor choices. We take a peek inside and discuss who on Earth would want to buy this place. (Spoiler alert: Someone already has!)

Other topics we cover:

  • The rise in “grandmillennial” decor. Is this simply OG hipster style or should we all be raiding Nana’s house?
  • You might think you’re saving energy (and money) by doing these things, but you’d be wrong! We cover common energy-saving myths that could be costing you.
  • And this week’s celebrity real estate winner is a power couple used to moving fast to win, while our loser just might need to reboot his listing after a nearly 50% price cut.

Ready to listen? Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. And please: Throw us a five-star rating if you like what you hear. The more good ratings and reviews we have, the easier it’ll be for people to find us.

Want to chime in? Have your own crazy home-related story you’re dying to share? We’re all ears, eagerly waiting to discuss all of your burning real estate questions. Email us at podcast@realtor.com, follow us on Facebook, or tweet us @housepartypod on Twitter.

———

Stories we discussed on ‘House Party’ this week:

What Is ‘Grandmillennial’ Style? Millennials Meet Granny Chic

Dr. Phil Lists Bonkers Beverly Hills Mansion for $5.75M

6 Energy-Saving Myths You Need to Stop Believing Right Now

Packers QB Aaron Rodgers and Race Car Phenom Danica Patrick Zoom Into a Malibu Mansion

Former Sun Microsystems CEO Scott McNealy Slashes Price on Silicon Valley Mansion



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