10 Easy Pieces: Kids’ Modern Beds


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Historical Reinterpretation: A Georgian Home Updated for a Young Family, by Fraher & Findlay


Renovating a home never comes without a few hiccups and halts, but this impressive South London project by Fraher & Findlay involved more than a fair share of complications. Dubbed the “Artists’ House” on account of the clients’ creative backgrounds, the building’s listed historical status meant that all plans had to be legally approved, and in fact, the architects’ application to move the kitchen from the basement to the parlor floor was at first rejected. “After a robust case was presented…at the final hour,” according to the brief, “the application’s recommendation was overturned and listed building consent granted.”

Phew. Another major challenge: the unique crescent shape of the building. “We were not working with regular or orthogonal shapes of spaces, so everything had to be bespoke,” explains Fraher & Findlay design director Lizzie Webster. Going custom meant, though, that she and the clients were able to tease exactly what they wanted from the home: an open, modern, and family-friendly design set inside a classic, if atypical, shell.

Join us for a tour.

Photography by Adam Scott, courtesy of Fraher & Findlay.

The home is at one end of a historical Georgian Crescent (note the curve in the building). The project, from design to construction, was overseen by Fraher & Findlay.
Above: The home is at one end of a historical Georgian Crescent (note the curve in the building). The project, from design to construction, was overseen by Fraher & Findlay.
Just off the entry hall is this coat room, where a streamlined and fun orange coat rack paired with a classic round foyer table announces the clients&#8
Above: Just off the entry hall is this coat room, where a streamlined and fun orange coat rack paired with a classic round foyer table announces the clients’ unique modern-meets-traditional sensibility.
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Above: “We wanted to create a really amazing entrance hall and reception space immediately off the hallway, and we wanted to keep this space connected with the rear living room and make the most of the natural daylight from the front of the house, hence the use of the glazed door set,” explains Lizzie. “The door set brings in the natural light but also creates a division of space when needed.”



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A Madcap Apartment in Paris for a Creative Couple (Plus Kids)


How many patterned tiles is too many? Anki Linde and Pierre Saalburg of Paris-based LSL Architects say to each his own limit—and that the couple who own this rambling Paris apartment happen to have a higher threshold than most.

These clients—she’s a film director/writer, he’s co-owner of a satirical newspaper, and they have two kids—approached the remodel of their Rue de la Rochefoucauld quarters with a playful spirit, and the architects responded in kind. “Each space is designed as if it has its own identity and story to tell, sometimes indifferent to each other,” says Linde. And yes, tile plays a starring role, some painted monkeys, too.

Photography by Katrin Vierkant, courtesy of LSL Architects.

The apartment occupies the third floor of a grand th-century Parisian building. Linde and Saalburg divided the layout into three zones: the living area in the center with the parents&#8
Above: The apartment occupies the third floor of a grand 19th-century Parisian building. Linde and Saalburg divided the layout into three zones: the living area in the center with the parents’ and kids’ rooms at opposite ends: “giving all parties the privacy they need.”

Linde describes the space pre-remodel as “refurbished for some banker in a sterile, cheap style,” but it came with preserved “point de hongre” (solid oak parquet) floors, marble fireplaces, and plaster moldings, all of which they repaired. The painting over the living room mantel is by Swedish artist Orjan Wickstrom. The reading light is from Ikea.

The living room opens to a combination dining area and kitchen. &#8
Above: The living room opens to a combination dining area and kitchen. “Even though the owners are very fond of cooking, they wanted the room to feel at first glance like a bar rather than a kitchen,” says Linde, noting that for the central counter Ceramiques Du Beaujolais fabricated 18 tile shapes to LSL’s specs.

The monkey-patterned walls mark the entry to the kids’ quarters.

The sink was custom made by Etains e Lyon, which specializes in classic all-metal sinks and counters. Linde sourced the industrial brushed stainless steel pulls online: they&#8
Above: The sink was custom made by Etains e Lyon, which specializes in classic all-metal sinks and counters. Linde sourced the industrial brushed stainless steel pulls online: they’re Poignée de Tirage Massive from Eurowale.

The mirrored cabinet to the right conceals the fridge and other storage: “it’s the place where things you don’t want to look at go.”

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Above: “We designed a wooden structure that the carpenter prepared onto which the tin was wrapped,” says Linde.
 Ab0ve: A built-inn pantry with a glazed steel door stands on the other side of the kitchen bar. The clients bought the French glass hanging lights at a flea market.
Ab0ve: A built-inn pantry with a glazed steel door stands on the other side of the kitchen bar. The clients bought the French glass hanging lights at a flea market.
The dining table doubles as a work area. It was bought at a Paris flea market and has a top made of blue stone from Liège.
Above: The dining table doubles as a work area. It was bought at a Paris flea market and has a top made of blue stone from Liège.



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