10 Easy Pieces: Kids’ Modern Beds


Copyright © 2020 Remodelista, LLC. All rights reserved. Remodelista, Gardenista, 10 Easy Pieces, Steal This Look, 5 Quick Fixes, Design Sleuth, High/Low Design, Sourcebook for the Considered Home, and Sourcebook for Considered Living are ® registered trademarks of Remodelista, LLC.

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A Stylish, Eco Hotel Designed by Quintana Partners


We leap to attention whenever Quintana Partners complete a project. Based in Barcelona and Menorca, Spain, interior designers Pol Castells and Benito Escat specialize in what they term “giving waste a second chance.” Translation: they like to begin with historic, often derelict structures and deftly renew them by exposing hidden layers—”the beauty behind all the paint”—and by introducing shored-up antiques. Sustainability guides their “reutilization mission”: see, for instance,  The All-Vintage Renovation and A Way With Old Kitchens.

In their latest hotel project, La Bionda Hotel in the Costa Brava beach town of Begur, they transformed a 17th-century townhouse into an eight-room parador that feels like a portal into another era. Working with owner Carla Lloveras, Pol and Benito built their design around the concept of a fictitious character, a 1930’s woman salon host who invited women artists, singers, writers, and actresses from all over to come stay.

Join us for a tour. The hotel is open to guests (and taking extra safety measures);  for those of us not not going anywhere soon, every room is filled with design ideas worth trying out at home.

Photography courtesy of Quintana Partners, unless noted.

The tiled entry opens to a signature Quintana Partners&#8
Above: The tiled entry opens to a signature Quintana Partners’ mix of textures and patinas. The hotel debuted on May 15.

In addition to preserving much of the original structure, Pol and Benito built sustainability into the design: the hotel’s website notes, “we generate most of our electrical energy through photovoltaic panels that use solar energy, and we generate cooling, heating, and hot water through an aerothermal system that uses energy from the outside air.” Photograph courtesy of La Bionda Hotel.

Just add red lacquer: the front desk was created from two vintages pieces renewed with glossy paint. The surfaces here range from newly laid herringbone brick to freshly plastered walls and a ceiling preserved in its excavated state.
Above: Just add red lacquer: the front desk was created from two vintages pieces renewed with glossy paint. The surfaces here range from newly laid herringbone brick to freshly plastered walls and a ceiling preserved in its excavated state.



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28 tranquil all-white bedrooms


Who doesn’t long for a bedroom that acts like a lullaby? If you’re sleep-challenged—isn’t everyone these days?—consider creating your own cloud chamber. Fans of all-white bedrooms use words like “tranquil,” “blank slate,” “no distractions,” and “Zen” to describe the appeal. There’s also an automatic tidy look that comes with opting for all white: a single color creates cohesion and, like a T-shirt, can stylistically go in any direction.

Too much etherealness, however, can be chilly and soporific (not necessarily in a good way). The key to a successful all-white approach is to introduce texture, slip in subtle patterns or varying shades of pale, and to accessorize with books, art, plants—or simply a wonderful view. Here are 27 standouts that demonstrate the great versatility of all white.

Under the Rafters

White on white in Rivka Baake and Wilfrid Kreutz&#8
Above: White on white in Rivka Baake and Wilfrid Kreutz’s bedroom in a converted industrial building in Hanau, Germany, where the couple make Calder-inspired mobiles. See Living Above the Studio: At Home and Work with Lappalainen. Photograph by Marc Krause, courtesy of Lappalainen.

How to select the right white for your room? For advice, take a look at 10 Easy Pieces: Architects’ White Paint Picks and How to Choose the Perfect White Paint.

Architect Sheila Bonnell designed a whitewashed aerie for herself and her husband, Mon Cochran, in their house on Cape Cape. Note the bed&#8
Above: Architect Sheila Bonnell designed a whitewashed aerie for herself and her husband, Mon Cochran, in their house on Cape Cape. Note the bed’s built-in drawers, which enable them to do without bedside tables. They don’t have shades either: the couple like to wake up at sunrise.

Explore the whole project in our book Remodelista: A Manual for the Considered Home. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Remodelista.



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Louisa Rowland’s Bartherotte cabin in Cap Ferret France


French website The Socialite Family chronicles how the “smart and cool”—and privileged—live in Europe. This is not the realm of inherited chateaus but of modernist taste applied to old Paris apartments and hipster vacation huts. One fave TSL fixation falls in the latter camp: British kids’-wear designer Louisa Rowland’s vacation cabane in Cap Ferret.

Not to be confused with glam Cap Ferrat on the Riviera, Cap Ferret due west of Bordeaux, is known as the Cape Cod of France. Situated on a piney 11-mile-long spit that runs between the Atlantic and Arcachon Bay, the beach enclave is a stylishly laid-back nature escape that attracts creative types. Join us for a glimpse inside one of its down-home-luxe cabins.

Photography by Constance Gennari, courtesy of The Socialite Family.

Rowland and family—her husband is a cameraman and they have twins, Hardy and Elodie—live in London, where she runs her unisex kids&#8
Above: Rowland and family—her husband is a cameraman and they have twins, Hardy and Elodie—live in London, where she runs her unisex kids’ clothing line ABC123me. But every vacation in the warm months, they head to Cap Ferret. Home for them there is one of the area’s coveted Bartherotte cabins, which the Socialite Family describes as “a sort of hut with a grandiloquent frame.”

The interior is all about wood. Rowland furnished the living area with inviting upholstered pieces, Welsh throws, and midcentury designs. “My style is eclectic, textured, rich and colorful with very strong influences from my travel, my childhood in Mexico, and my husband’s Indian heritage,” she told the Socialite Family. Rowland grew up mostly in London but attended a lycée, and she and her children speak French at home. Fashion runs in her genes: Her sister Anda runs the family’s Savile Row tailor shop, Anderson & Sheppard.

A midcentury credenza is topped by a vintage lamp.
Above: A midcentury credenza is topped by a vintage lamp.



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Ask A Designer: How To Turn Your Bedroom Into A Nature-Inspired Retreat


In this Ask A Designer column, Jennifer Koper shares her easy and affordable tips for creating a relaxing respite.

Question: We’re looking to decorate our bedroom with a nature theme. What do you think of a leaf- or birch tree–print wallpaper, and what colors would you recommend?  Gen, Toronto

Answer: Wallpaper is a fantastic way to add interest in a room and address large expanses of wall. Take inspiration from this beautiful bedroom designed by Jennifer Morrison of Morrison Design House.

Here’s what I suggest to get a similar look:

Paper all the walls for an enveloping, cohesive feel. This forest-print paper by Lewis & Wood has a depth that will make your room feel more expansive, and the soothing gray and blue tones won’t overwhelm. (Wallpapering behind the bed will also help camouflage the small off-center window.)

(Source: Bosky Wallpaper in Blue Yonder, approx. $156/yd. (approx. $11.80/sq.ft.), available through Kravet Canada or lewisandwood.co.uk)

(Source: Albero Duck Egg Wallpaper, approx. $198/roll (approx. $3.50/sq.ft.), grahambrown.com)

Get a louvered shutter for the small window, and paint it the background color of your wallpaper (like Benjamin Moore’s Serenata) so it blends in to the wall. Dress up the large window with drapery that has an embroidered medallion motif. The small-scale pattern will work perfectly with tree-themed wall coverings.

(Source: Aubrey Blue Embroidered Curtain Panel, starting at $170, crateandbarrel.ca)

Paint your ceiling and crown molding a pale blue pulled from the wallpaper and choose a bedding set in a similar tone.

(Source: Linen Duvet Covers in Mist, $330, flaxsleep.com)

Add a couple of shams in a small-scale pattern…

(Source: Kiska Textiles Pillow Case in Filigree Sky/Indigo, $85, shophouseandhome.com)

…and layer on a cozy throw.

(Source: Nao Throw in Soft Grey, $30, shophouseandhome.com)

Update your nightstands with brighter, wood-toned versions. The legs will lift the furniture off the floor and make the space feel airier.

(Source: Kabbann Acacia Wood Bedside Table, $229, structube.com)

Add textured, white ceramic lamps on the nightstands that play on a leaf pattern.

(Source: Textured Ceramic Table Lamp, $80, bouclair.com)

Swap out your flush-mount light fixture (not visible) for a rattan pendant to bring in even more warmth.

(Source: Teresa Pendant Light, $102, vdevmaison.com)

With these updates, you’ll have a serene bedroom retreat that’s perfect for relaxing in and catching some zzz’s.

Do you have a design dilemma? Send your questions to askadesigner@hhmedia.com.



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Steal This Look: A Bungalow Bedroom in Malibu, California


Copyright © 2020 Remodelista, LLC. All rights reserved. Remodelista, Gardenista, 10 Easy Pieces, Steal This Look, 5 Quick Fixes, Design Sleuth, High/Low Design, Sourcebook for the Considered Home, and Sourcebook for Considered Living are ® registered trademarks of Remodelista, LLC.

The Remodelista editors provide a curated selection of product recommendations for your consideration. Clicking through to the retailer that sells the product may earn us a commission.



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Angela Medlin’s Chic Victorian House in Portland, Oregon


“Miss Vicky, as I affectionately named her, is a soulful lady with a little edginess,” says Angela Medlin by way of introduction to her 1906 Victorian cottage in Portland, Oregon’s Sunnyside. Medlin is a fashion designer and self-described “creativepreneur” specializing in sportswear: a series of job overseeing apparel collections for Adidas and Nike’s Jordan Brand are what led her to relocate to Portland, Oregon—three different times. She’s currently staying put, living and working in Miss Vicky.

Medlin bought her house five years ago—”I was  renting a place around the corner and drove by as the broker was staking the For Sale sign in the ground”—and what began as a purely cosmetic remodel ended up, as they so often so, requiring unanticipated structural work. Seven months later, Medlin came away with a new kitchen (and foundation under it) and an entirely different looking house: in place of the “mustard and ketchup” exterior, she introduced a stately, unifying charcoal black.

We discovered Medlin first as fans of House Dogge, her stylish dog toys company, and then via a blog post in Schoolhouse Electric. Intrigued, we came (digitally) knocking and she welcomed us in.

Photography courtesy of Schoolhouse Electric, unless noted.

The exterior is painted in Graphite with Onyx trim, both from Benjamin Moore  (to see the transformative powers of paint, scroll to the end for a Before shot).
Above: The exterior is painted in Graphite with Onyx trim, both from Benjamin Moore  (to see the transformative powers of paint, scroll to the end for a Before shot).

“My friends and family will tell you, they were not convinced by my vision,” Medlin tells us. “Ha ha, Miss Vicky just needed some love. As a non-traditional designer, I followed my instincts and chose color to reimagine the look of this traditional house.”

Medlin and her beloved, late dog Wubbi, an Olde English Bulldogge. Medlin is wearing a sweatshirt of her own design—currently not in production but she makes a Hoody Fleece that&#8
Above: Medlin and her beloved, late dog Wubbi, an Olde English Bulldogge. Medlin is wearing a sweatshirt of her own design—currently not in production but she makes a Hoody Fleece that’s “the equivalent for dogs.”



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A Colorful, Well-Planned Tiny Apartment Design by Beata Heuman


If you ask Beata Heuman, the problem with most rooms is that “people lack an imaginative approach.” The same could not be said of the rising star interior designer. Heuman, 37,  is based in London, where she runs her own seven-person firm—in lieu of going to design school, she trained, starting at age 21, in the bustling office of Nicky Haslam, another fan of letting loose. Heuman grew up on a farm in northwest Sweden—her father is a farmer and her mother a doctor. From Haslam she says learned about English comfort and where to get just about anything fabricated; from her Swedish heritage, she was taught to “think very long term—I aim for my designs to last for generations.”

The owner of this tiny Victorian mews apartment in Paddington, a novelist in her thirties who divides her time between Cornwall and London, gave Heuman the following direction for overhauling her compact quarters: “She had just returned from Venice and loved the feeling at the Peggy Guggenheim Museum of turning a corner and having an unexpected world open up.” In other words, she spoke Heuman’s language. Join us for a peek inside.

Photography courtesy of Beata Heuman.

The flat is on the ground floor of a long-ago converted stables. Opposite the entrance, Heuman created a dining area/home office in the existing &#8
Above: The flat is on the ground floor of a long-ago converted stables. Opposite the entrance, Heuman created a dining area/home office in the existing “orangerie-like” extension, which she enhanced by elevating the formerly flat roof.

It has a custom-designed upholstered banquette and an oak table set on a plinth “so there’s room to get in and around it.” The lights are from Habitat.

Lacking space for a door, Heuman hung a curtain of unlined white linen that &#8
Above: Lacking space for a door, Heuman hung a curtain of unlined white linen that “emits a soft glow” while separating the dining room from the living space. Here, to make up for a lack of sunlight, she covered the walls with Phillip Jeffries seagrass wallpaper and went with a palette of greens and blues that reference the natural world.

As is her custom, Heuman designed all of the upholstered furniture and mixed it with antiques.  She scaled the sofa to double as a guest bed (“the back cushions just have to be removed”) and the octagonal ottoman opens so that bedding can be stored inside.

The kitchen is tucked in the other end of the room, set off by a marble-topped breakfast bar faced with rattan (which in the corner cleverly serves as a ventilated radiator cover). The arched wall was &#8
Above: The kitchen is tucked in the other end of the room, set off by a marble-topped breakfast bar faced with rattan (which in the corner cleverly serves as a ventilated radiator cover). The arched wall was “already there but not prominent.”

Note the shallow cabinet over the fireplace: it hides the TV behind doors covered in Fornasetti cloud-patterned wallpaper. The floor throughout is the original painted in Farrow & Ball’s graphite Downpipe, “an affordable upgrade.”

By installing bespoke kitchen cabinets—painted in Dulux&#8
Above: By installing bespoke kitchen cabinets—painted in Dulux’s Woodland Pearl I—Heuman was able to make use of every centimeter: the slots are for trays and cutting boards; the vented cupboard over the range holds a self-circulating extractor fan.

The counters are Carrara marble and the bridge faucet is by Barber Wilsons.



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small bedroom solution: the DIY paneled-wood headboard


Hammering the panels. &#8
Above: Hammering the panels. “The last plank is the one that goes on top; attach it with screws or wood glue or both,” says Maiju. “I also covered the screw marks with a filler to give them a more finished look.”

Maiju says she’s self taught and that one project has led to another: “It’s been a long process starting with painting picture frames and chairs. Over time, I’ve learned to use different electrical tools. Renovation projects are my meditation. And since my other work is digital, it’s always so rewarding to see concrete results.” Interestingly, Maiju’s last name, Saha, translates as “Saw” in English, which is how she got her blog name, Maiju Saw.

Maiju chose a shade of sage green. She painted the pine directly; you can also prime the panels before installation. For detailed, step-by-step instructions (in Finnish; use Google to translate), go to Maiju Saw.
Above: Maiju chose a shade of sage green. She painted the pine directly; you can also prime the panels before installation. For detailed, step-by-step instructions (in Finnish; use Google to translate), go to Maiju Saw.

The Finished Project

The finished headboard is approximately 45 inches tall and is topped with a shelf for small objects. Learn more about paneling options in Remodeling data-src=
Above: The finished headboard is approximately 45 inches tall and is topped with a shelf for small objects. Learn more about paneling options in Remodeling 101: The Ultimate Guide to Shiplap, Beadboard, and V-Groove Paneling.
Maiju made the bedside ceramic lamp at a clay workshop and finished it with a vintage pleated shade. The leaf pillow is made from a William Morris fabric bought on Etsy; the striped bedding is from H&M Home.
Above: Maiju made the bedside ceramic lamp at a clay workshop and finished it with a vintage pleated shade. The leaf pillow is made from a William Morris fabric bought on Etsy; the striped bedding is from H&M Home.

Browse our DIY Project archives for more ideas, including:

Rehab Diaries: DIY Beadboard Ceilings, Before and After

A DIY Kitchen Overhaul for Under $500, Beadboard Backsplash Included

Idea to Steal: A DIY Headboard from a Natural Fiber Rug



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a London Remodel by a Rising Interior Designer


After earning an architectural interior design degree from the prestigious Inchbald School and working for two design firms in London’s Chelsea, Lonika Chande felt ready to strike out on her own. What she needed was an initial solo project to show what she can do.

That commission came from Lonika’s mother, Lucy Dickens, an artist (and great-great granddaughter of Charles Dickens), who dabbles in real estate: she and Lonika’s stepfather had bought a one-bedroom fixer-upper in Hampstead that they wanted to overhaul as a high-end, long-term rental. The place needed a top-to-bottom renewal: scroll to the end to see the Before shots.

“Having worked on a number of projects since, it’s fair to say that working with family is not the easiest,” Lonika tells us. Among the challenges: having to cater to her own and her mother’s perfectionist standards on a budget, select finishes that can take a beating from renters, and persuade Lucy to embrace color: “her tendency has always been to paint absolutely everything brilliant white.” Being “more emotionally invested,” Lonika adds, also played to both of their strengths. Join us for a look at the results.

Photography by Simon Brown, courtesy of Lonika Chande Interior Design.

Situated on the ground floor of a Victorian building, the approximately 645-square-foot flat was in recent years  used as student digs, but had initially been an artist&#8
Above: Situated on the ground floor of a Victorian building, the approximately 645-square-foot flat was in recent years  used as student digs, but had initially been an artist’s studio, and that’s the vibe Lonika and Lucy wanted to re-create using traditional detailing.

The living area came with nearly 10-foot-tall ceilings and original windows that required restoring. Lucy agreed to expand her white paint palette: the walls are in “a warm and inviting but still neutral shade,” says Lonika—Paper I from the Paint & Paper Library. “With no cornice, the ceiling was painted in with the walls to soften the junction between the two. The window sash bars and rails were painted in Off-Black by Farrow & Ball, not only to make them stand out, but also to highlight the pretty Victorian spindles on the balcony behind. We went for bespoke sheer roller privacy blinds set inside the recess to expose as much of the original paneled detailing on the window architrave as possible.”



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