Post-redesigning, post-gutting, post-remodeling, the home is unrecognizable. It’s hard to imagine that the gracious compound of modern-rustic structures in rural Cotswold was once a forlorn ranch-style house. But if you look closely, you’ll see that the original single-story building is still there, albeit spiffed up and augmented.

“The story behind the house is very much about it being a retrofit rather than a new build,” says Kate Luxton, a proponent of salvaging over scrapping. “We’re trying to work with existing buildings to keep the carbon footprint as low as possible, rather than knocking them down and starting again,” she tells us of her husband’s architectural firm Charlie Luxton Design, of which she is the studio manager.

The owners of the home, a young couple with kids, were fortunately also interested in preserving what they could of the old building while expanding its size and elevating its design. And after a cost analysis of “tear-down and rebuild” versus “retrofit and remodel” yielded comparative budgets, they were completely on board with the Luxtons’ vision for a sensitive conversion.

Below, the remarkable transformation of a dated bungalow into a modern rural retreat.

Photography by Ed RS Aves, courtesy of Charlie Luxton Design.

The original brick bungalow was short on charm and space.
Above: The original brick bungalow was short on charm and space.
Post-renovation. The original walls of the bungalow were retained and and re-insulated. Insulating well, says the firm, is the single most important action homeowners can take to lower one&#8
Above: Post-renovation. The original walls of the bungalow were retained and and re-insulated. Insulating well, says the firm, is the single most important action homeowners can take to lower one’s carbon footprint. The wood-cladded top portion of the structure is new.
The path to the front door. The newly pitched roofs add height to the home.
Above: The path to the front door. The newly pitched roofs add height to the home.
In the entry, a plywood built-in wardrobe features pegs (for hanging outerwear) arranged to replicate the profile of the house.
Above: In the entry, a plywood built-in wardrobe features pegs (for hanging outerwear) arranged to replicate the profile of the house.
Just off the entry is the kitchen, which has a window seat for added seating.
Above: Just off the entry is the kitchen, which has a window seat for added seating.
The view toward the front door. The cabinets are by deVOL. The concrete flooring on the first level is original to the home.
Above: The view toward the front door. The cabinets are by deVOL. The concrete flooring on the first level is original to the home.
The oak veneer pendant lights are by Hay.
Above: The oak veneer pendant lights are by Hay.
The Vertigo Pendant Light by Constance Guisset hangs over the cozy living room.
Above: The Vertigo Pendant Light by Constance Guisset hangs over the cozy living room.
The dining room feels like a sun room thanks to a wall of floor-to-ceiling windows. The light is Michael Anastassiades’s IC S
Above: The dining room feels like a sun room thanks to a wall of floor-to-ceiling windows. The light is Michael Anastassiades’s IC S2 Pendant.
The children&#8
Above: The children’s wing features two bedrooms and whimsical Lioness & Palms Wallpaper, by C.F.A. Voysey, from CommonRoom.
The kids&#8
Above: The kids’ bathroom, with tiles from Bert & May.
The second floor above the children&#8
Above: The second floor above the children’s wing features two additional bedrooms. The colorful planter is actually a woven plastic storage basket from the London store Milagros.
The walk-through plywood closet in the master bedroom.
Above: The walk-through plywood closet in the master bedroom.
The patio right outside the dining room.
Above: The patio right outside the dining room.
An off-the-shelf galvanized animal-feed trough is cleverly repurposed as a pond for growing aquatic plants. &#8
Above: An off-the-shelf galvanized animal-feed trough is cleverly repurposed as a pond for growing aquatic plants. “It’s kept clean with a solar-powered filter,” says Kate.

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