Life As A Real Estate Agent, As Told By Tiger King





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Anyone who’s seen even a minute of the Netflix show “Tiger King” knows that Exotic Joe and his crew lead pretty crazy lives. So, who better to help put into words the day to day craziness we experience as real estate agents?!

Here are 19 ways the crazy crew of Tiger King nails what it’s like to be a real estate agent:

1. Giving your clients handshakes, hugs, and high fives at the closing table during the quarantine we’re currently under…

2. Does it feel good when a listing you lost to another agent expires?

3. When a buyer says they aren’t pre-approved, but “they know they can afford it”…

4. After hanging up on the Zillow rep trying to sell you leads for the hundredth time…

5. 3 months into paying a lead gen contract…

6. The attitude of the agent who’s been farming a neighborhood for ages.

7. When a seller asks you where you’re going to market their property…

8. “But Zillow says my house is worth…”

9. The hope of an agent who takes an overpriced listing…

10. The offer that sounded okay…until you opened it.

11. Guy with a lowball offer: “What’ll it take to put this deal together?”

12. What are the chances the guy with the lowball offer got his offer accepted?

13. The dad of a first time buyer coming to check out the house before they sign anything.

14. The dad giving his blessing…

15. When an agent pulls the “I’ve been in business this many years” card…

16. When a potential client tells you that their friend’s mother’s best friend’s hairdresser is also an agent…

17. How you feel when a relative works with another agent…

18. “Why do you go to the real estate convention?”

19. After a tough day…after working 27 days straight.







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5 Reasons Why Introverts Make Amazing Real Estate Agents


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It’s not a stretch to say that people tend to stereotype various professions. When you think of an accountant, you probably think of someone who dresses conservatively, and has an analytical personality. An artist, on the other hand, is thought of as freewheeling and whimsical, marching to the beat of their own drum.

And, when it comes to real estate agents, many people—because of representations made in movies or pop culture—think of a fast-talking, outgoing extrovert, charming everyone to their heart’s desire.

But this isn’t always the case. In fact, there are quite a few introverts who make their living helping others buy and sell houses, and they’re pretty darn good at it too. Certain qualities introverts have might even give them an advantage when it comes to the business. Here are a few of them:

1. They’re excellent listeners

There’s nothing worse than trying to have a conversation with someone who won’t let you get a word in. And in real estate, someone who doesn’t listen can cost you time and money. That’s why introverts—who tend to be great listeners—are so wonderful to work with. They’ll take the time to understand you and your needs.

2. They understand how important a home is

Introverted personalities don’t spend much time at bars and nightclubs, and instead tend to spend time at home, in a comfortable and familiar place. This gives them a unique appreciation for how important a home really is—an appreciation they will carry into your transaction. Empathy can go a long way, especially when it comes to something as personal as where you live.

3. They pay attention to detail

A real estate transaction can be fraught with details, many of which have serious implications for the parties involved. This is why it’s important to work with someone who takes the time to understand the whole picture rather than just breezing through the fine print. Introverts tend to be more contemplative, and focus on details, which is an asset when dealing with something which has as many moving parts as a real estate transaction.

4. They consider all sides before acting

Empathy is one of the most valuable characteristics a real estate agent can possess. Introverts have an advantage here, and are likely to take the time to consider all sides and perspectives throughout the transaction. This means you can expect compassion and understanding for your situation, and insight into the buyer’s or seller’s situation on the other side as well. If everyone feels understood, then things tend to go more smoothly, and everybody walks away happy.

5. They’re trustworthy

Let’s be honest… have you ever seen an episode of American Greed where the person who swindled money from unsuspecting victims was an introvert? It’s very unlikely. Introverts are selective in how they interact with the world, and they value each and every relationship, rather than viewing people as disposable strangers who come and go. This might mean they’re not always quick to trust, but it also means they take their responsibility to others seriously, and are honest, ethical, and fair. And, at the end of the day, is there anything more important in a real estate transaction than trust?

So, when you’re sizing up a real estate agent to work with, don’t necessarily expect (or want) your agent to be the loud, outgoing type! A more reserved introvert could be the best agent for you to work with. But, you may have to look a little harder to find him or her, because, well, they probably aren’t out there beating their chests and screaming about how great they are…



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5 Reasons Why Introverts Make Amazing Real Estate Agents


Inner Circle members: Share a personalized version of this article from the members area.

It’s not a stretch to say that people tend to stereotype various professions. When you think of an accountant, you probably think of someone who dresses conservatively, and has an analytical personality. An artist, on the other hand, is thought of as freewheeling and whimsical, marching to the beat of their own drum.

And, when it comes to real estate agents, many people—because of representations made in movies or pop culture—think of a fast-talking, outgoing extrovert, charming everyone to their heart’s desire.

But this isn’t always the case. In fact, there are quite a few introverts who make their living helping others buy and sell houses, and they’re pretty darn good at it too. Certain qualities introverts have might even give them an advantage when it comes to the business. Here are a few of them:

1. They’re excellent listeners

There’s nothing worse than trying to have a conversation with someone who won’t let you get a word in. And in real estate, someone who doesn’t listen can cost you time and money. That’s why introverts—who tend to be great listeners—are so wonderful to work with. They’ll take the time to understand you and your needs.

2. They understand how important a home is

Introverted personalities don’t spend much time at bars and nightclubs, and instead tend to spend time at home, in a comfortable and familiar place. This gives them a unique appreciation for how important a home really is—an appreciation they will carry into your transaction. Empathy can go a long way, especially when it comes to something as personal as where you live.

3. They pay attention to detail

A real estate transaction can be fraught with details, many of which have serious implications for the parties involved. This is why it’s important to work with someone who takes the time to understand the whole picture rather than just breezing through the fine print. Introverts tend to be more contemplative, and focus on details, which is an asset when dealing with something which has as many moving parts as a real estate transaction.

4. They consider all sides before acting

Empathy is one of the most valuable characteristics a real estate agent can possess. Introverts have an advantage here, and are likely to take the time to consider all sides and perspectives throughout the transaction. This means you can expect compassion and understanding for your situation, and insight into the buyer’s or seller’s situation on the other side as well. If everyone feels understood, then things tend to go more smoothly, and everybody walks away happy.

5. They’re trustworthy

Let’s be honest… have you ever seen an episode of American Greed where the person who swindled money from unsuspecting victims was an introvert? It’s very unlikely. Introverts are selective in how they interact with the world, and they value each and every relationship, rather than viewing people as disposable strangers who come and go. This might mean they’re not always quick to trust, but it also means they take their responsibility to others seriously, and are honest, ethical, and fair. And, at the end of the day, is there anything more important in a real estate transaction than trust?

So, when you’re sizing up a real estate agent to work with, don’t necessarily expect (or want) your agent to be the loud, outgoing type! A more reserved introvert could be the best agent for you to work with. But, you may have to look a little harder to find him or her, because, well, they probably aren’t out there beating their chests and screaming about how great they are…



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3 Things That Have Changed in Real Estate Since the Pandemic (and 3 Things That Haven’t)


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The global COVID-19 pandemic has affected life across the globe. Strict social distancing measures, school closures, and, in many locales, a ban on all non-essential businesses have turned people’s lives upside down and thrust us into a surreal existence where we’re spending nearly all of our time at home.

From a real estate perspective, it would be disingenuous to say that nothing has changed. Great agents are honest at all times, even (especially) when it’s difficult.

That said, there’s no indication that we’re in (or headed toward) a housing crisis like the once-in-a-century 2008 collapse. And, by all accounts, the fundamentals of the housing market remain in place, despite the safety precautions enforced by health and government officials.

The following list may help you better understand what’s changed and what hasn’t in the world of real estate:

What’s changed:

1. Access to showings

In many places, the process of showing a home has changed. Some states have put limits on the number of people allowed to gather in one place, which has impacted open houses. Additionally, sellers, buyers, and agents are taking more precautions to keep themselves safe, with more cleaning, access to protective gear, and enforced distancing measures becoming the norm. Digital-only showings are also growing in popularity, although they’re still relatively new. Despite all this, if there’s a home you’re interested in seeing, it’s still possible to make it happen.

2. The closing process

Much of the work that needs to be done between going under contract to sell or buy a house and the closing can be done remotely and electronically. But there are many things that need to be done by many people throughout the process. From the mortgage, to the title work, to inspections and appraisals, getting to the closing table depends upon a lot of people doing their job. Social distancing and working entirely remotely has a certain learning curve while everyone involved figures out how to get their end of things done. So, the process may take at least a little longer, and change as everyone figures out the best way to handle things. The upshot to this is that it could create better, more efficient ways of doing things moving forward.

3. Some mortgage products

Perhaps the most impactful changes in the real estate industry are happening in the mortgage market. The conditions on certain products are being tightened, and some lenders are temporarily exiting the market altogether. Jumbo loans (a type of financing where the loan amount is higher than the conforming loan limits set by the Federal Housing Finance Agency) seem to be feeling the most impact, while conventional loans, which are considered less risky, have been less affected. If you have questions about getting pre-approved, you should contact a mortgage professional who can help you better understand your options.

What hasn’t changed:

1. People’s dreams

Even when the whole world comes to a stop, our hearts and minds do not. We all have dreams, whether it’s owning a fabulous condo in the city, a sprawling victorian with a rolling lawn, or a starter home that we can finally call our own. A pandemic doesn’t change that, even though it can help put things in perspective and remind us of what matters most. But don’t let the strange times we’re in stop you from daydreaming and working toward those dreams. A pandemic is temporary; our hopes are not.

2. Housing demand

There’s been a well-documented housing shortage for years, and there’s no indication that the fundamentals have yet changed. That said, every real estate market is unique, and what holds true on a macro-level may not hold true in your local area. Regardless of the specific market and overall demand in your area, people always need homes, despite a pandemic. So, if you want to sell, there’s likely a buyer for your home. And if you want to buy, there’s likely a seller who’d love to sell.

3. Our desire to help

Most agents eat, breathe, and sleep real estate, and aside from looking out for our loved ones and wishing for a healthy and safe resolution to this mess, that hasn’t changed. We want to help you with your real estate needs because we’re passionate about what we do, and it’s likely that our newfound home-time has coincided with a lot more real estate research than it has with cleaning or learning how to play the guitar.



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Most Popular Decor Trends In 2020


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When it comes to home decor, there are lots of styles to choose from, and their applications vary wildly from home to home.

But did you know that tastes also vary by state?

It’s true. Trends vary by where you live. According to data from Google (and a really great graphic made by the folks at Living Spaces), there are seven main design styles that are popular right now… and the people in every state show a distinct preference for one of these styles.

national decor trends

Image credit: Living Spaces

These States Love The Bohemian Look:

Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Connecticut, Hawaii, Indiana, Kansas, Maine, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Dakota, and Virginia

With an eclectic mix of interesting items and appealing textures, Boho style decor is carefree and relaxed. Just like the style itself, a wide variety of states call this style their favorite — from the farthest west to the farthest east, Boho is here to stay.

If you like variety and comfort, the Boho look might be right for you no matter where you live.

Boho Style

These States Prefer Contemporary Style:

Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Nevada

Contemporary style really came into its own over the last 50 years or so. Think of it as Modern’s easygoing brother. They both share a love of simplicity, bold color, and clean lines, but Contemporary decor is more rounded, soft, and comfortable. It’s interesting that three East Coast states and one Old West state went this way. Maybe a lot of East Coast folk made their way to Vegas?

If you favor open spaces and a sleek but comfortable aesthetic, consider Contemporary style for your home.

Contemporary Style

These States Went Crazy For Coastal Decor:

Delaware, Florida, South Carolina

This one’s kind of a no-brainer. All three states that love coastal style for the home are beachy destinations. That doesn’t mean the folks in these states are hanging fishnets and oars on the wall à la Red Lobster, though.

Coastal style in 2020 means beachy vibes — bright and airy, with clean, unfussy lines and classic colors. Earthy textures are also part of this scheme, so if you like grasscloth and linen, then coastal might just be the right style for you!

Coastal Style

These States Fell In Love With Farmhouse Style:

Georgia, Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, West Virginia, Wyoming

Back in 2013, a little show called Fixer Upper aired for the first time on HGTV. From then on, farmhouse decor exploded in popularity, and in these 10 states, it’s still the reigning queen of all styles.

Now, Chip and Joanna Gaines didn’t invent farmhouse decor, but their show certainly helped usher it into the mainstream. With traditional shapes, rustic finishes, and warm, homey colors and textures, farmhouse is a very liveable style and that’s why it’s still popular in many places across the US to this day.

If you like a mix of well-loved classic items and new country-chic touches, then Farmhouse would be a great choice for your home!

Farmhouse Style

These States Think Industrial Decor Is Ideal:

Arizona, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Wisconsin

In years prior, many of the states that favor Industrial once thought Farmhouse was tops. Industrial style is kind of a more modern version of Farmhouse, so many of the homeowners who made the switch just updated a few pieces rather than going for an overhaul.

Industrial style gives a nod to the steampunk trend, so if you’re a fan of salvaged and upcycled wood and metals, then this look will probably appeal to you!

Industrial Style

These States Adore Mid-Century Modern Style:

Nebraska, Oregon, Washington

Mid-Century Modern is a style based in — you guessed it — the designs of the mid-20th century. The “futuristic” look created in the 40s and 50s has a Jetsons-esque vibe, so it’s no surprise that it’s popular in tech-heavy Washington and neighboring Oregon. As for Nebraska, this midwest state has a long-standing history of appreciating the tried-and-true.

Featuring clean lines, organic shapes, and bold statement colors, Mid-Century Modern looks good in a variety of homes and, if the last 70 years is anything to go by, it won’t go out of fashion any time soon.

If you like designer classics and retro overtones, then MCM could be the perfect scheme for your home, too.

Mid-Century Modern Style

These States Have A Soft Spot For Scandinavian Design:

California, Colorado

With a cool, airy, minimalist vibe, and sleek, functional furniture, Scandinavian design feels both futuristic and timeless. California is usually at the forefront of trends, so expect Scandi style to sweep eastward in the near future.

Low pieces with slim legs, simple but bold accessories, and primary colors play a big role in Scandi design. The ultimate in unfussy decor, this is a good look for homes of any size.

Are you a fan of practical but warm and fashionable design? If so, Scandi might be just the thing for your home!

Scandinavian Style

Now that you’ve seen all of these styles and the states that love them, which style do you like best? And does your state agree, or are you the odd one out?



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Most Popular Decor Trends In 2020


Inner Circle members: Share a personalized version of this article from the members area.

When it comes to home decor, there are lots of styles to choose from, and their applications vary wildly from home to home.

But did you know that tastes also vary by state?

It’s true. Trends vary by where you live. According to data from Google (and a really great graphic made by the folks at Living Spaces), there are seven main design styles that are popular right now… and the people in every state show a distinct preference for one of these styles.

national decor trends

These States Love The Bohemian Look:

Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Connecticut, Hawaii, Indiana, Kansas, Maine, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Dakota, and Virginia

With an eclectic mix of interesting items and appealing textures, Boho style decor is carefree and relaxed. Just like the style itself, a wide variety of states call this style their favorite — from the farthest west to the farthest east, Boho is here to stay.

If you like variety and comfort, the Boho look might be right for you no matter where you live.

Boho Style

These States Prefer Contemporary Style:

Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Nevada

Contemporary style really came into its own over the last 50 years or so. Think of it as Modern’s easygoing brother. They both share a love of simplicity, bold color, and clean lines, but Contemporary decor is more rounded, soft, and comfortable. It’s interesting that three East Coast states and one Old West state went this way. Maybe a lot of East Coast folk made their way to Vegas?

If you favor open spaces and a sleek but comfortable aesthetic, consider Contemporary style for your home.

Contemporary Style

These States Went Crazy For Coastal Decor:

Delaware, Florida, South Carolina

This one’s kind of a no-brainer. All three states that love coastal style for the home are beachy destinations. That doesn’t mean the folks in these states are hanging fishnets and oars on the wall à la Red Lobster, though.

Coastal style in 2020 means beachy vibes — bright and airy, with clean, unfussy lines and classic colors. Earthy textures are also part of this scheme, so if you like grasscloth and linen, then coastal might just be the right style for you!

Coastal Style

These States Fell In Love With Farmhouse Style:

Georgia, Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, West Virginia, Wyoming

Back in 2013, a little show called Fixer Upper aired for the first time on HGTV. From then on, farmhouse decor exploded in popularity, and in these 10 states, it’s still the reigning queen of all styles.

Now, Chip and Joanna Gaines didn’t invent farmhouse decor, but their show certainly helped usher it into the mainstream. With traditional shapes, rustic finishes, and warm, homey colors and textures, farmhouse is a very liveable style and that’s why it’s still popular in many places across the US to this day.

If you like a mix of well-loved classic items and new country-chic touches, then Farmhouse would be a great choice for your home!

Farmhouse Style

These States Think Industrial Decor Is Ideal:

Arizona, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Wisconsin

In years prior, many of the states that favor Industrial once thought Farmhouse was tops. Industrial style is kind of a more modern version of Farmhouse, so many of the homeowners who made the switch just updated a few pieces rather than going for an overhaul.

Industrial style gives a nod to the steampunk trend, so if you’re a fan of salvaged and upcycled wood and metals, then this look will probably appeal to you!

Industrial Style

These States Adore Mid-Century Modern Style:

Nebraska, Oregon, Washington

Mid-Century Modern is a style based in — you guessed it — the designs of the mid-20th century. The “futuristic” look created in the 40s and 50s has a Jetsons-esque vibe, so it’s no surprise that it’s popular in tech-heavy Washington and neighboring Oregon. As for Nebraska, this midwest state has a long-standing history of appreciating the tried-and-true.

Featuring clean lines, organic shapes, and bold statement colors, Mid-Century Modern looks good in a variety of homes and, if the last 70 years is anything to go by, it won’t go out of fashion any time soon.

If you like designer classics and retro overtones, then MCM could be the perfect scheme for your home, too.

Mid-Century Modern Style

These States Have A Soft Spot For Scandinavian Design:

California, Colorado

With a cool, airy, minimalist vibe, and sleek, functional furniture, Scandinavian design feels both futuristic and timeless. California is usually at the forefront of trends, so expect Scandi style to sweep eastward in the near future.

Low pieces with slim legs, simple but bold accessories, and primary colors play a big role in Scandi design. The ultimate in unfussy decor, this is a good look for homes of any size.

Are you a fan of practical but warm and fashionable design? If so, Scandi might be just the thing for your home!

Scandinavian Style

Now that you’ve seen all of these styles and the states that love them, which style do you like best? And does your state agree, or are you the odd one out?



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